Art (ART)

ART 102. Color Theory and Practice. (1.5)

This course will introduce the students to basic theory, physical properties, and use of color through hands-on projects, readings, lecture, discussion, and critiques. During the 7-week sprint course period, students will develop various short and long-term projects that apply color in 2d, 3d, and 4d mediums. Students will learn how color is made and manipulated, what color looks like, the cultural context that gives color meaning.

ART 103. Creative Practices in New Technology. (1.5)

Students will investigate strategies for integrating contemporary media tools into their art and design practice through a series of exercises and projects. As a part of this investigative strategy, students will be introduced to relevant digital technologies for creative output as well as publicizing their artwork such as personal websites, pdf, and social media.

ART 104. Problem Solving. (1.5)

This course considers the role and processes of “thinking” as an integral tool of art making, considered in its relation to the training of the hand and the eye. Students will be asked to solve problems, old and new, and to identify and create new problems. Problems are understood here in an abstract sense — they may come in the form of materials, situations, social encounters and more. At the end of the course the student should be able to demonstrate an improved ability to identify and articulate a line of investigation that interests them, along with their motivations and strategies for embarking on that path.

ART 105. Technical Drawing. (1.5)

This is an introductory course focusing on the understanding and practical application of drawing from imagination using codified systems of construction and representation. During this course we will gain a working knowledge of how structured systems of drawing can be used to both ideate and communicate ideas. Emphasis is placed on learning the basics of linear perspective and the use of drawing to create objects and environments as an inventive process, the development of technical hand skills, the application of those skills using drawing tools, and the introduction and exploration of digital processes such as computer assisted drawing (CAD).

ART 106. Introduction to Figure Drawing. (1.5)

This course is an introduction to drawing the human form. Emphasis is placed on learning to see by stressing intense looking, critical judgment, and precise measuring through direct observation. Students will learn basic anatomy and structure of the human form as well as explore emotive possibilities. Studies from the model will be given context through exploration of the historical context of drawing from the figure. Most class periods will be spent drawing from the nude model but may also include clothed figure studies and portraiture. In class image presentations, discussions, and demonstrations will reinforce the basic concepts. Non-majors are encouraged to contact the Art office to seek permission.
Prerequisite: ART 121, or permission of the instructor.

ART 111. Design and Composition. (3)

This is an introductory course focusing on the design elements and design principals in two, three, and four dimensions. Students will practice idea generation, good craftsmanship, and design vocabulary. Class will consist of discussions, presentations, quizzes, and critiques. Projects will be completed in some of the following media: paper, assemblage, cardboard, plaster, found object, Adobe Photoshop, and Adobe Illustrator. A laptop computer and Adobe Creative Suite/Cloud are required tools for this course.

ART 121. Observational Drawing. (3)

This studio course introduces the students to the basic theory and practice of drawing. Through variety of observational drawing activities, students will develop perceptual drawing skills; become versatile with achromatic drawing media such as graphite and charcoal; and gain conceptual and practical understanding of composing two-dimensional space. Lectures, demonstrations, critiques, and critical readings will complement the hands-on-learning process.

ART 130. Lasercutting and Digital Design for Everyday Use. (1.5)

This course is an introduction to Computer Aided Design (CAD) processes and lasercutting for non-designers focusing on the techniques involved in the rapidly developing fabrication industry. By using digital fabrication tools and techniques, outcomes will focus on the creation of objects for practical application and everyday use.

ART 131. 3D Printing and Digital Fabrication for Everyday Use. (1.5)

This course focuses on learning techniques and design processes using 3D printers and associated computer software. Students will create unique design objects for practical purposes and their personal everyday use. Emphasis is placed on the techniques involved in the rapidly developing fabrication industry focusing on the modeling and creation of three-dimensional forms.

ART 140. Beginning Glass. (1.5)

Basic course to provide foundation exercises and instruction in various glass techniques such as kilnforming and some hot glass processes, ranging from fusing and beadmaking to casting.

ART 145. Beginning Sewing I. (2)

Introductory course to learn basic machine functions, fabric preparation, applied sewing skills for garment construction, e-pattern use, body measurement, basic closures and finishing.

ART 146. Beginning Sewing II. (2)

Continuation of Beginning Sewing 1. Refinement and additional development of machine sewing skills. More advanced stitching techniques, custom pattern development, draping and fitting related to garment construction, design, fitting and finishing.
Prerequisite: ART 145.

ART 147. Beginning Art Photography. (1.5)

Basic 35 mm camera operation, black and white darkroom technique and theories of photographic composition. 35mm manually adjustable camera required.

ART 149. Beginning Digital Photography. (1.5)

Intro to digital photography. Camera controls, file management, Photoshop enhancements, and printing. Emphasis will be placed on composition, lighting and subject matter. Digital camera required. No camera phones.

ART 151. What is Graphic Design?. (1)

An introductory course in the graphic design program that defines the field and gives an overview of the professional venues in which designers practice.

ART 155. Beginning Drawing. (1.5)

Basic drawing instruction to non-art majors. Exploration of line, value, media measurement, and composition.

ART 160. Beginning Ceramics. (1.5)

Basic ceramic construction, composition, and firing techniques.

ART 162. Arts of Africa, Oceania and Native America. (3) (MPF)

This course is a survey of the visual and performed arts of Africa, Oceania and Native America. These regions and their arts, often relegated to the constructed category of “non-Western,” will be considered from their religious, political, historical and cultural contexts. The course also explores the Western bias inherent in the study of “non-Western” art, providing students with a broader understanding to the ways in which cultures from around the world produce, employ and conceptualize what the West has conventionally label as “art.” In examining sculpture, multi-media installation, festivals, masquerade, textiles, dress, ritual spaces, international artists and many more, students are exposed to alternative ways of looking at and understanding visual and performed expression. IIA, IIIB.

ART 165. Beginning Metals. (1.5)

Introductory metalsmithing and design for the beginning student.

ART 170. Basic Woodworking. (1.5)

Basic course to provide foundation exercises and instruction in the use of woodworking tools and machinery.

ART 171. Visual Fundamentals: 3-D. (3)

Basic foundation studio course dealing with methods, materials, principals of organization and elements of design applied to the third dimension.
Prerequisite: Art 111.

ART 177. Independent Studies. (0-5)

ART 181. Concepts in Art. (3) (MPF)

Introduction to visual and thematic concepts as applied to art in various cultures and historical periods. IIA.

ART 183. Images of America. (3) (MPF)

Investigating the power and influence of visual art imagery, either about, targeted to, or made by diverse segments of historic and contemporary American society and how this imagery has helped or hindered our coming together as a diverse nation. Explores the use of art stereotypes as a basis for evaluation, how visual components help define culture, the decoding of cultural codes and how the idea of taste and aesthetics influences the way we see ourselves and others. IC, IIA, IIB.
Cross-listed with AMS.

ART 185. India and Southeast Asia. (3) (MPF, MPT)

Survey of Art in India and Southeast Asia. This region witnessed the origins and development of two major world religions, Hinduism and Buddhism, as well as the brilliant manifestation of a third, Islam. Emphasis placed on understanding cultural foundations of Hindu, Buddhist, and Islamic art. IIA, IIB. CAS-B.

ART 187. History of Western Art: Prehistoric-Gothic. (3) (MPF)

Historical survey of Western art, including development of concepts necessary for analysis and appreciation of great works of art. IIA, IIB. CAS-B.

ART 188. History of Western Art: Renaissance - Modern. (3) (MPF)

Historical survey of Western art, including development of concepts necessary for analysis and appreciation of great works of art. IIA, IIB. CAS-B.

ART 189. History of Western Dress. (3) (MPF, MPT)

Provides an overview of Western dress from ancient times to the present. Emphasis placed on the social and cultural factors that have influenced the evolution of dress for both men and women. IIA, IIB.

ART 195. Introduction to Art Education. (3)

Thematic approaches to art education will be discussed and applied through personal artmaking, lesson planning and experiences in community settings. Students will visit PK-12 schools and other educational sites and practice methods of digital documentation and reflective practice. Field experience hours required. Can be taken with ART 295 or ART 296.

ART 221. Drawing III. (3)

Intermediate-level drawing problems.
3 Lab. includes Lec.
Prerequisite: ART 121.

ART 222. Drawing IV. (3)

Intermediate-level drawing problems.
3 Lab. includes Lec.
Prerequisite: ART 121.

ART 231. Painting I. (3)

Introduction to the use of oil and/or waterbase media with emphasis on pictorial structure.
3 Lab. includes Lec.
Prerequisite: ART 121 or permission of instructor.

ART 233. Global Perspectives on Dress. (3) (MPF)

Provides the student with an overview of the study of dress with emphasis on the relationship between dress and its meaning in a variety of cultures. Dress in its physical and social environments and as an art form will be examined. IIA.

ART 241. Printmaking I. (3)

Studio introduction to printmaking media and processes with emphasis on intaglio and relief printing such as etching and woodcut. Composition and concepts for pictorial communication.
Prerequisite: ART 121 or permission of instructor.

ART 251. Typography. (3)

This course concentrates on design principles specific to typography. Project based topics include: design drawing, letterform constructions, and the visual enhancement of language and message. Typographic methods and terminology of both traditional and digital processes are also covered.
Prerequisite: successful completion of graphic design portfolio review or permission of instructor.

ART 252. Image. (3)

This course covers visual and symbolic communication, including generation of visual symbols, graphic simplification, communication of content through form, and visual metaphor. Visual problem-solving skills and concepts are addressed. Further development of technical skills.
Prerequisite: successful completion of the graphic design portfolio review or permission of instructor.

ART 254. Fundamentals of Interaction Design. (3)

This course covers foundational concepts of interaction design, combining coding language development with visual interface design for the production of engaging and functional interactive sites and applications. Visual and textual hierarchy for electronic media is addressed and development processes with a device-agnostic approach to information architecture and interface design are practiced.
Prerequisite: successful completion of the graphic design portfolio review or permission of instructor.

ART 255. Introduction to Digital Imaging. (3)

This introduction course will cover the basics of digital camera operation, adjusting and manipulating images in Adobe Photoshop and digital printing methods.

ART 256. Design, Perception & Audience. (3) (MPF, MPT)

An introduction to perception and audience issues for the artist/designer and those interested in art/design, to learn how audiences perceive, receive and react to visual messages. Universal design principles, usability, learning theory, communication theory and semiotics are discussed. IIA.

ART 257. Photography. (3)

Introduction to basic 35 mm camera operation, black and white darkroom technique and aesthetic approaches to art of photography.

ART 259. Art and Digital Tools I. (3)

This course builds a solid foundation for making and manipulating digital images and graphics, and for thinking about the cultural nature of visual materials produced with these processes and software tools. Students will critically engage with a variety of related imagery, from fine art to marketing. Technical theory is coupled with projects to provide hands-on mastery of fundamental ideas, techniques, and specific software tools.
Cross-listed with IMS.

ART 261. Ceramics I. (3) (MPT)

Exploring plastic materials in three-dimensional form using coil, slab, mold fabrication, and wheel throwing as an introductory experience in clay. Traditional and contemporary approaches explored. Several decorative methods and firings extend perception of the entire ceramic process. Materials fee.
3 Lab. includes Lec.
Prerequisite: ART 111 or permission of instructor.

ART 264. Jewelry Design and Metals I. (3) (MPT)

Exploration of three-dimensional forms in nonferrous metals. Introduction to basic metalworking processes and techniques of the jeweler and silversmith. Materials fee.
3 Lab. includes Lec.
Prerequisite: ART 111 or permission of instructor.

ART 271. Sculpture I. (3) (MPT)

Studio course to provide the beginning sculpture student with a foundation in critical aesthetic thinking and of methods, techniques, and materials used in the process of making sculpture. Materials fee. 3 Lab., includes Lec.
Prerequisite: ART 111 or permission of instructor.

ART 276. Introduction to the Art of the Black Diaspora. (3) (MPF)

Introduces visual arts produced by black artists in Africa, the U.S., and the Black Diaspora. Examines seminal creative ideas, philosophies, and movements and focuses on the work of key artists in analyzing the contextual significance of art in society. IIA, IIIB. CAS-B.
Cross-listed with BWS 276.

ART 277. Independent Studies. (0-5)

ART 279. Buddhism and Culture: China and Japan. (3) (MPF)

Deals with East Asia and time span of more than 15 centuries (from 4th through 20th). Provides historical overview of the development of Buddhism in China and Japan with a clear definition of theoretical framework of this religion. Investigates nature and extent of Buddhist influence on the imagination of intellectuals and lifestyle of the populace. All cultural phenomena, thematically treated, are interpreted within historical, social, economic, and institutional contexts, and in contrast to those of the West. IIB. CAS-B.
Cross-listed with JPN.

ART 281. Contemporary Art Forum. (1; maximum 8)

This is a lecture-based course that focuses on the discussion of contemporary visual art and design issues and their relationship to fundamental visual art practices. Students will attend lectures by visiting artists, write reflective responses, attend one field trip to a contemporary art venue, and attend break-out discussion sessions. The course uses a credit/no credit system based on attendance and written responses to lectures. Students will be exposed to current trends and issues in the art world causing them to think critically of their place in contemporary practice of art and design.

ART 283. Modern America. (3) (MPF)

A chronological survey of modern American art and visual culture aimed to develop an understanding and critical awareness of representation. Addresses major art movements in historical context with an emphasis on issues related to nationality, cultural exchange, identity, the role of the artist and society, the human body, and nature. IIA, IIB.

ART 285. Writing and the Visual Arts. (3)

A course for beginning art history majors and others interested in a critical approach to reading texts, researching, and talking about works of art. Focuses on research methods, critical thinking, reading and writing, and formal presentation techniques. Students will learn how to recognize and use art historical methodology; how to read critically in order to determine an author's thesis, argument, approach(es), and biases; and how to perform specialized research using the methods discussed in class, resulting in a class presentation and research paper. ADVW.

ART 286. History of Asian Art, China, Korea, and Japan. (3) (MPF, MPT)

Introduction to major artistic traditions of China, Korea, and Japan. Emphasis placed on understanding the cultural foundations of Bronze Age art in East Asia, the impact of Buddhism in the region, and later painting and ceramic traditions. IIA, IIB. CAS-B.

ART 295. Elementary Art Methods. (3)

Philosophy, methodology, and application of art education at the elementary level. Planning for artistic growth and early creative development in students from Pre-K through elementary grades will be explored including thematic planning, backwards design, instructional strategies, curriculum mapping, assessment, advocacy, and arts integration. Lecture, discussion, and hands-on course for students majoring in art education. Field experience hours required. Can be taken with ART 195.

ART 296. Secondary Art Methods. (3)

Philosophy, methodology, and application of art education at the secondary level. Planning for artistic growth in students from middle to high school art education will be explored including thematic planning, backwards design, instructional strategies, curriculum mapping, assessment, advocacy, and arts integration. Lecture, discussion, and hands-on course for students majoring in art education. Field experience hours required. Can be taken with ART 195.

ART 309. The Arts of African Peoples. (3)

Introduction to the arts of Africa and exploration of the central function of the arts in African systems of thought. The role of ancestors and deities will be explored, as will the context within which the arts are produced and used.

ART 311. Chinese Painting History. (3) (MPT)

A thematic and chronological study of the various genres of Chinese painting, emphasizing major issues and artists from the Han period to the twentieth century. Recommended prerequisite: ART 286.

ART 312. Japanese Paintings and Prints. (3) (MPT)

Study of major painters and genres in the history of Japanese art, including Buddhist painting and the Japanese print. Recommended prerequisite: ART 286.

ART 314. The Renaissance in Italy. (3) (MPT)

Surveys the visual arts of Italy from 1300 to 1500 and especially the artistic centers of Florence, Rome and Venice. Examines the individuals, corporations, as well as the various historical, social, and religious phenomena driving the production of painting, sculpture, and architecture.

ART 315. High Renaissance and Mannerism. (3)

Information and insight toward an understanding of the major developments in the history of art from the late fifteenth through sixteenth century in Europe, Italy in particular. Called High Renaissance and Mannerism, the relationship of these trends with concurrent political events, social, religious, and philosophical ideas will be discussed at times to enhance this understanding.

ART 316. Baroque Art in Europe. (3)

This course covers the painting, sculpture and architecture of Europe from the late sixteenth century through the early eighteenth century. It will focus on the individuals, corporations, as well as the various historical, social, and religious phenomena driving the production of painting, sculpture, and architecture.

ART 317. The Arts of Colonial Latin America. (3)

Explores the art of Iberia and Latin America, with a particular emphasis on the latter, from 1492 to 1810. Topics to be examined include conquest, assimilation, integration, and resistance as it informed the predominantly religious art and urban fabric of Latin America.
Cross-listed with LAS.

ART 318. Modernism, Modernity, and the Visual Arts. (3)

This course addresses some of the significant movements and developments in art and culture between 1860 and 1960. Artistic debates in Europe and the United States will be discussed in relation to a historical framework of cultural changes brought about by capitalism, industrialization, war, and revolution.

ART 319. Postmodern Art and Theory. (3)

Examines issues that highlight the shifting and often conflicting nature of what is called the postmodern era. Concentrates primarily on meaning(s) as well as stylistic, historical, and theoretical developments of painting, sculpture, conceptual and performance art, installation, and non-traditional photography and video/film work.

ART 320. Thematic Studio. (3; maximum 12)

Topics in art/drawing methodologies that are extensions and/or applications of skills and concepts offered in previous drawing courses. Thematic subjects include such topics as animation, experimental media, and advanced drawing.
Prerequisite: ART 222 or permission of the instructor.

ART 321. Drawing V. (3; maximum 6)

Drawing problems requiring advanced conceptual and technical skills.
3 Lab. includes Lec.
Prerequisite: six semester hours in ART 221, ART 222.

ART 322. Drawing VI. (3; maximum 6)

Drawing problems requiring advanced conceptual and technical skills.
3 Lab. includes Lec.
Prerequisite: six semester hours in ART 221, ART 222.

ART 326. Modern & Contemporary East Asian Art. (3)

This course is an investigation of the various modern and contemporary art movements in East Asia from the nineteenth century through the twenty-first century. What did the modern ideal mean in the various regions of China, Japan, Korea, and the diaspora? What forms did it take? The establishment of traditionalist movements will be equally as important to tracing the development of Asian modernism(s). Can one exist without the idea of the other? Taking art objects and their related texts as our core evidence, this course will also consider the ways that the politics, literatures, popular cultures, and pasts of modern East Asia nations have intersected with one another and with the world. Coming forward into the present, what does it mean to be an artist from East Asia in the contemporary art world of global biennials and art fairs? Key concepts will include: post-colonialism, Marxism, nationalism, socialism, gender, ethnicity, modernism, traditionalism, post-modernism, diaspora, etc.

ART 331. Painting II. (3)

Painting problems using both representational and abstract approaches in various painting media.
3 Lab. includes Lec.
Prerequisite: ART 231.

ART 332. Painting III. (3)

Painting problems using both representational and abstract approaches in various painting media.
3 Lab. includes Lec.
Prerequisite: ART 231.

ART 335. Arts of West Africa. (3) (MPF)

This course examines the visual and performed expressions of West Africa, spanning from centuries-old archaeological sculpture to contemporary art and artists working today. Due to Africa's long and layered history with neighboring regions and global interactions, the course also addresses connections to North Africa, the trans-Saharan trade network, the trans-Atlantic slave trade, Diaspora cultures and international artists who identify with West Africa. West Africa is well known for its rich artistic culture: wooden sculpture, masquerades, ritual, elaborate textiles, dress, ceramics, architecture, metalwork, multi-media installation, beadwork, festivals and many more. This course explores these artistic genres, learning about the role of art in the lives of the people who make and use it. IIIB.
Cross-listed with BWS.

ART 340. Internship. (0-20)

ART 341. Printmaking II. (3)

Lithography and intaglio techniques.
3 Lab. includes Lec.
Prerequisite: ART 241.

ART 342. Printmaking III. (3)

Lithography and intaglio techniques.
3 Lab. includes Lec.
Prerequisite: ART 241.

ART 343. The Art of Visual Presentation. (3)

The content of this course covers the personal presentation techniques and technical skills necessary to craft presentations that communicate messages clearly, with persuasive effect. Explores presentation softwares, screen-based media types, and animation techniques that enhance the presentation of information.
Prerequisite: ART/IMS 259.

ART 344. Personal Branding. (3)

In this course students will learn the general strategies and principles of branding. Projects will focus on how to promote oneself through such applications as a unique personal logo/mark, promotional video, resume, and social media. Special emphasis will be placed upon logo development and brainstorming. (Adobe Creative Cloud subscription is required).
Prerequisite: ART/IMS 259.

ART 345. Graphic Design Prototyping. (3)

In this course students will learn the process of design thinking which they will then apply to layout for both print and web. Projects will result in prototypes that could be tested with the user (publications, posters, mobile apps, websites, etc.) Special emphasis will be placed upon typography. (Adobe Creative Cloud subscription is required).
Prerequisite: ART/IMS 259.

ART 350. Illustration. (3; maximum 6)

Emphasizes development of drawing and painting techniques significant to the creation of illustrations for publication and related pragmatic conditions. Addresses problem analysis, visual research, media and space constraints, cost and time factors as well as personal stylistic growth in this specialized discipline. Lecture and slides supplement studio work.
Prerequisites: ART 121 and 231, or permission of instructor.

ART 351. Design Systems. (3)

This course synthesizes concepts learned in typography and graphic form through the development of visual programs for sequential viewing. Ideas of sequence and series, organization, and typographic hierarchy are addressed through poster, brochure, and book design. More complex Macintosh skills addressed.
Prerequisite: ART 251, 254.

ART 352. Identity Systems. (3)

Through the generation of marks, symbols, logotypes and their applications, discusses the practical and aesthetic concerns surrounding corporate identity systems. More complex problem-solving skills explored.
Prerequisite: ART 351.

ART 353. The Business of Design. (3)

An introduction to basic business issues relevant for graphic designers in today's competitive marketplace, including the development of strategic marketing skills, finances and budgeting, the creation of client contracts, basic production knowledge, and other business management issues.
Prerequisite: ART 252, 254, or permission of instructor.

ART 354. 3-Dimensional Design. (6)

This course focuses on three dimensional concepts and design considerations through the exploration of such projects as signage and packaging. A majority of the semester is spent completing a comprehensive multidisciplinary project with architecture + interior design. Prerequisite: ART 351.

ART 355. Applied Interaction Design. (3)

Complements the traditional design coursework with the investigation of design for interactive media. The influence of time and non-linear organization on a design solution will be carefully studied through various interactive applications. (i.e. websites, interactive CDs, and motion graphics).
Prerequisites: ART 252, ART 254.

ART 357. Photography II. (3)

Continued development of aesthetic, conceptual and technical processes in photography. Emphasis on traditional black and white film exposure, processing and printing.
Prerequisite: ART 257 or permission of instructor.

ART 358. Photography III. (3)

Continued development of aesthetic, conceptual and technical processes in photography. Emphasis on traditional black and white film exposure, processing and printing.
Prerequisite: ART 257 or permission of instructor.

ART 361. Ceramics II. (3) (MPT)

Pottery, design, wheel throwing, decoration, glazing, and firing. Raw materials introduction, lectures and applied. Materials fee.
3 Lab. includes Lec.
Prerequisite: ART 261.

ART 362. Ceramics III. (3) (MPT)

Pottery and sculpture design, forming, wheel throwing, decoration, glazing, and firing. Clay and glaze materials and formulations covered. Materials fee.
3 Lab. includes Lec.
Prerequisite: ART 261, 361 or permission of instructor.

ART 364. Jewelry Design and Metals II. (3) (MPT)

Creative designing of two- and three-dimensional forms for contemporary jewelry and holloware. Development of basic metals processes: fabrication, raising, stone-setting, forging, casting. Materials fee. 3 Lab includes Lec.
Prerequisite: ART 264.

ART 365. Jewelry Design and Metals III. (3) (MPT)

Intermediate problems in design and process for jewelry, holloware and flatware. Materials fee. 3 Lab includes Lec.
Prerequisite: ART 364.

ART 371. Sculpture II. (3) (MPT)

Studio problems based on concepts applied to various three-dimensional methods, techniques, and materials. Materials fee.
3 Lab. includes Lec.
Prerequisite: ART 271.

ART 372. Sculpture III. (3) (MPT)

Intermediate studio problems based on concepts applied to three-dimensional methods, techniques, and materials. Beginning emphasis on individual direction. Materials fee.
3 Lab. includes Lec.
Prerequisite: ART 371.

ART 377. Independent Studies. (0-5)

ART 381. Greek and Roman Architecture. (3) (MPT)

Architecture in the Greek, Hellenistic, and Roman world; development and usage of Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian orders in the Greek world and the Roman response and adaptation. Various architectural forms, both public and private.

ART 382. Greek and Roman Sculpture. (3) (MPT)

Sculpture in the Greek, Hellenistic, and Roman world. Emphasis on the development of the human figure in the Greek world with attention to sculptures of Pheidias, Praxiteles, Scopas, and Lysippos. The Roman response to the Greek Canons is evaluated and development of Roman portrait sculpture is critically reviewed.

ART 383. Greek and Roman Painting. (3) (MPT)

Greek and Roman painting; examination of the development of Greek vase painting with special emphasis on red and black figure vase painting; examination of tomb paintings of Etruscan civilization with study of Roman painting from Pompeii and Herculaneum with attention to styles, perspective, methods of painting, and uses of color.

ART 384. Greek and Roman Decorative Arts. (3)

This course is designed to introduce students to the decorative arts of antiquity. Generally referred to as the minor arts or, archaeologically, small finds, the small scale and decorative arts of antiquity provide us with the majority of our evidence for art in the ancient world, but are frequently understudied. This course will introduce you to material not covered in depth in the introductory courses on ancient art. Unlike ancient painting or monumental sculpture, the decorative arts of antiquity represent forms that the majority of people experienced, that the majority of artists created, and that provide the best evidence for workshops, stylistic transmission and movement of artists and works in antiquity. Decorative arts, therefore, give a much more complete sense of the artistic heritage of the Greco-Roman world.

ART 386. Art of the Weimar Republic. (3)

This class will trace developments in painting, photography, film, and architecture in Germany from 1918-1933. We will focus on connections between art and the historical and political events of this particularly turbulent time in Germany history. Artists to be studied include: Walter Gropius, Mies van der Rohe, Fritz Lang, Hannah Hoch, Georg Grosz, August Sander, and Laszlo Moholy-Nagy. Relevant artistic movements include: Expressionism, Dada, the Bauhaus, and New Objectivity.
Cross-listed with GER.

ART 389. The History of Photography. (3)

This course will trace central developments in photography's history, from its nineteenth-century origins to its present digital afterlife. Rather than attempting a comprehensive survey of the medium, we will examine a series of case studies taken from the diverse discourses in which photography functions, including art, science, law, journalism, criminology, urban planning, and entertainment. Particular attention will be paid to theoretical and methodological questions underpinning the medium. Recommended prerequisite: ART 188.

ART 390. Supplemental Problems. (1-3; maximum 6)

Supplemental problems in any one of the department's 300-level studio areas.
Co-requisite: related 300-level course and permission of instructor.

ART 391. Field Study in Art and Architecture History. (3; maximum 3)

Structured experience outside the classroom; internship or study abroad. Restricted to majors who have completed the sophomore year.

ART 395. Art Across the Curriculum. (3)

Philosophy, art education theory and cross-curricular teaching and learning methodology. Students will apply methodology to both coursework and field experience, collaborating with non-art areas. Students will design and produce lessons and sequential curriculum that takes into account both visual arts and common core standards. Upon completion of this course, students will conceptualize art as an interdisciplinary subject as well as demonstrate a competency for designing and implementing interdisciplinary art lessons. Field experience hours required.
Prerequisites: ART 195, ART 295, ART 296, or permission of instructor.

ART 419. Supervised Student Teaching in Art. (16) (MPC)

Supervised teaching in a public school or approved social agency. Regularly scheduled seminars with university supervisor. Completion of assessments including edTPA and content and pedagogy exams for certification. Regular assessments by cooperating teacher for the purpose of assisting the student teacher in practice teaching. Required overall GPA of 2.80 and expected GPA of 3.00 in the major field. Cannot be taken concurrently with any other courses.
Prerequisite: all Professional Ed and Art Ed courses must be taken last (or second to last semester before graduation with instructor approval).

ART 421. Drawing VII. (3)

Application of concepts, techniques, and design through various painting media. Emphasis on personalized statement by the student. Designed to complete the logical sequence of drawing offerings.
3 Lab. includes Lec.
Prerequisite: ART 321, 322.

ART 422. Drawing VIII. (3)

Application of concepts, techniques, and design through various painting media. Emphasis on personalized statement by the student. Designed to complete the logical sequence of drawing offerings.
3 Lab. includes Lec.
Prerequisite: ART 321, 322.

ART 431/ART 531. Painting IV. (3)

Application of concepts, techniques, and composition through various painting media. Emphasis on a personalized statement by the student.
3 Lab. includes Lec.
Prerequisite: ART 331, 332.

ART 432/ART 532. Painting V. (3)

Application of concepts, techniques, and composition through various painting media. Emphasis on a personalized statement by the student.
3 Lab. includes Lec.
Prerequisite: ART 331, 332.

ART 441/ART 541. Printmaking IV. (3)

Emphasis on personal investigation in intaglio, lithography, silkscreen, or relief processes.
3 Lab. includes Lec.
Prerequisite: ART 341, 342.

ART 442. Printmaking V. (3)

Emphasis on personal investigation in intaglio, lithography, silkscreen, or relief processes.
3 Lab. includes Lec.
Prerequisite: ART 341, 342.

ART 450. Alternative Design Media. (3)

This course explores design media used as artistic expression, as well as a vehicle for visual communication. Students will be challenged to think conceptually about the form and content of traditional media.
Prerequisite: ART 111, 121 or permission of instructor.

ART 451. The Professional Portfolio. (3)

Includes revision of existing pieces to professional standards and the execution of work to complete the professional portfolio. Photographing of work, design, craft, organization, and presentation of the portfolio discussed. Covers topics related to the business of graphic design and the production knowledge necessary to work in today's profession.
Prerequisite: ART 352, 354.

ART 452. Senior Degree Project. (3) (MPC)

Individual projects proposed, researched, and executed. Enables students to learn how to define and limit a project, choose the best format for a particular communication goal, organize and schedule time, and set and meet interim goals. Participation in a gallery exhibit is a requirement of this course.
Prerequisite: ART 451.

ART 453. Highwire Brand Studio. (4) (MPC)

Multidisciplinary practicum involving students from marketing, graphic design and other relevant majors. Competing, multi-disciplinary student teams work for a semester on an actual client's current brandings and marketing communications challenge. Campaign solutions typically include primary research and market analysis, campaign strategy development and graphic design for advertising and other sales support materials. Incorporates contemporary technology and industry standard materials and research. Expertise and facilities of marketing, graphic design and other relevant majors are fully integrated within each team. Each campaign is formally presented to the client at the end of the semester.
Prerequisites: ART 352 and ART 354 or permission of instructor.

ART 455/ART 555. Design History and Cultural Contexts. (3)

Overview of the history and cultural context of various design disciplines. The prevalent styles and design traditions expressed in the mass-produced products of both Europe and America from the Industrial Revolution to the present.
Prerequisites: ART 187, 188, advanced standing or permission of the instructor.

ART 457. Photography IV. (3)

Development of a personal body of photographic work. Advanced study of experimental techniques, conceptual practice and photographic theory.
Prerequisite: ART 357, 358.

ART 458. Photography V. (3)

Advanced development of a personal body of photographic work.
Prerequisite: ART 457.

ART 461/ART 561. Ceramics IV. (3)

Advanced problems in ceramic design emphasizing individual creativity and requiring technical proficiency. Materials fee.
3 Lab. includes Lec.
Prerequisite: nine semester hours in ceramics.

ART 462/ART 562. Ceramics V. (3)

Advanced problems in ceramic design emphasizing individual creativity and requiring technical proficiency. Students must complete a professional portfolio of work. Materials fee.
3 Lab. includes Lec.
Prerequisite: 12 hours in ceramics.

ART 464/ART 564. Jewelry Design and Metals IV. (3; maximum 6)

Advanced design and technical problems in jewelry, holloware, flatware, and/or other areas of individual interest. Emphasis on personal expression and research, portfolio development. Materials fee.
3 Lab. includes Lec.
Prerequisite: ART 365.

ART 465/ART 565. Jewelry Design & Metals V. (3)

Advanced problems in jewelry design & metals requiring individual creativity and technical proficiency. Emphasis on creative personal direction, research, and creating a professional portfolio. Materials fee.
Prerequisite: ART 464/ART 564.

ART 471/ART 571. Sculpture IV. (3)

Advanced problems in sculpture requiring skill with sculpture processes and ability to interpret ideas three-dimensionally.
3 Lab. includes Lec.
Prerequisite: ART 372.

ART 472/ART 572. Sculpture V. (3)

Advanced problems in sculpture requiring skill with sculpture processes and ability to interpret ideas three-dimensionally. Emphasis on creative personal direction, professional portfolio, and research. Materials fee.
3 Lab. includes Lec.
Prerequisite: ART 471/ART 571.

ART 477. Independent Studies. (0-5)

ART 480. Seminar in Art History. (3; maximum 6)

Seminar for advanced students. Topics vary.

ART 486/ART 586. Art of the Late 19th Century. (3) (MPT)

Painting and sculpture in Western Europe and the United States from mid-19th century to the turn of the century with special emphasis on realism, impressionism, and post-impressionism.

ART 487/ART 587. Art of the Early 20th Century. (3) (MPT)

Development of modernist painting and sculpture in Western Europe and the United States from 1900 to 1945.

ART 489/ART 589. Art of the Late 20th Century. (3) (MPT)

Painting, sculpture, architecture, and allied arts from 1945 through post-modernism.

ART 490. Supplemental Problems. (1-3; maximum 9)

Supplemental problems in any one of the department's 400-level studio areas.
Co-requisite: related 400-level course and permission of instructor.

ART 492. Professional Artist's Portfolio and Exhibition Experience. (3) (MPC)

Supervised development of individual professional artist's portfolio and participation in a group or solo gallery exhibition. Periodic scheduled meetings with peers and faculty mentors in the individual studio areas. With permission of instructor, students who have completed a focus sequence in one of the vertical studio offerings may be permitted to enroll in this studio Capstone.
Prerequisite: senior standing in one of these studio concentrations: ceramics, metals, photography, painting, printmaking, or sculpture.
Co-requisite: a 400-level studio.

ART 493. Professional Dispositions in Art Education. (3)

This course is designed to engage students in the development of professional dispositions and preparation of being an effective and productive art educator. Students will participate in local and national professional organizations, network with practicing educators, hone philosophy statements and understandings, maintain a professional website, develop and utilize professional resources, explore writing for publication, and participate in the planning/dissemination of the John Michael Autobiogrpahical Series. This course can be taken with ART 495.
Prerequisites: ART 195, 295, 296, and 395.

ART 495. Art Education Practicum. (3)

Supervised participation in practicum at art education site. Students will develop proficiency in curriculum planning, instructional methodology, effective communication in and outside the classroom, and self and program asessment. Often referred to as Saturday Art, students will have the opportunity to directly plan, teach, and assess a class of K-12 students. This course can be taken with ART 493. 495 can be taken multiple times.
Prerequisites: ART 195, 295, 296, and 395.

ART 496/ART 596. Seminar on Theory for Visual Artists. (3; maximum 6)

Links theoretical contexts influential in educating visual artists to varied thematic structures and practical issues as utilized by visual artists.
Prerequisite: ART 221.

ART 498. History and Methods in Art and Architectural History. (3) (MPC)

Culminating class for Art and Architecture History majors. Discussions and projects that give students the opportunity to assimilate knowledge gained in the study of art history.
Prerequisite: senior in the History of Art and Architecture.

ART 600. Advanced Research Problems. (1-3; maximum 18)

Research in art and art literature.
Prerequisite: graduate standing in art.

ART 601. Teaching Assistant Seminar. (3)

Includes prevalent issues, concerns, and problems confronting art teacher in college studio setting. For students with little or no experience teaching art; provides insight into teaching.
Prerequisite: admission to Department of Art graduate program.

ART 620. Graduate Study in Drawing. (3-6; maximum 18)

Professionally oriented studio drawing problems emphasizing personal interpretation.
Prerequisite: graduate standing in art.

ART 630. Graduate Study in Painting. (3-6; maximum 48)

Application of advanced techniques and pictorial concepts to problems in painting directed toward individual professional performance. Appropriate research and related studio work.
Prerequisite: graduate standing in studio art.

ART 640. Graduate Study in Printmaking. (3-6; maximum 48)

Research and related laboratory work in fine print media. Advanced study in intaglio, relief, and planographic media.
Prerequisite: graduate standing in studio art.

ART 650. Graduate Study in Experience Design. (3-6; maximum 48)

Use applied research to design, develop, deploy and test design solutions, gaining insight and knowledge by doing. Course structure will include short, intensive workshops with visiting designers, collaborative team-based projects, and individual design work.

ART 651. Systems Design. (3)

Explores both theoretical and pragmatic approaches to aid the identification, evaluation, understanding, application and development of systems for addressing 'hard' and 'soft' problems. Addresses the evaluation and formulation of problems with both human and non-human factors as agents.
Prerequisite: graduate status and acceptance into the program.

ART 660. Graduate Study in Ceramics. (3-6; maximum 48)

Intensive studio problems in ceramics stressing professional orientation and personal interpretation. Materials fee.
Prerequisite: graduate standing in studio art.

ART 664. Graduate Study in Metals. (3-6; maximum 48)

Provides qualified graduate student with intensive study in metal craftsmanship as an art form.
Prerequisite: graduate standing in studio art.

ART 670. Graduate Study in Sculpture. (3-6; maximum 48)

Intensive studio problems in sculpting emphasizing professional orientation and personal interpretation.
Prerequisite: graduate standing in studio art.

ART 677. Independent Studies. (0-5)

ART 680. Graduate Seminar in Art History. (3; maximum 9)

Special studies in the history of art centered upon a designated topic or area of study which may vary with each offering.
Prerequisite: graduate standing in art or permission of instructor.

ART 690. Special Problems. (1-3; maximum 18)

Individual studio problems for graduate art student.
Prerequisite: graduate standing in art.

ART 700. Thesis. (1-12; maximum 18)

.