French (FRE)

Note: Students who intend to continue studying the same foreign language as in high school are required to take the placement exam for that language before enrolling. See Placement Guides in the Academic Planning chapter. Once placed, a student may not skip a course in the sequence leading to FRE 202. No student may take FRE 101, FRE 102 or FRE 201 Credit/No Credit.

FRE 101. Elementary French. (4)

Emphasis on multiple skill acquisition, speaking, and writing, and how cultural difference affects experience of the world.
Prerequisite: see Placement Guides in the Academic Planning chapter.

FRE 102. Elementary French. (4)

Emphasis on multiple skill acquisition, speaking, and writing, and how cultural difference affects experience of the world.
Prerequisite: see Placement Guides in the Academic Planning chapter.

FRE 107L. Practical French. (4)

Develops basic language skills to function in a French language environment. Aimed at MUDEC students who do not intend to continue French or who have already completed their university language requirement. Students who intend to continue French must take placement test to determine level of next class.

FRE 131. Masterpieces of French Culture in Translation. (3) (MPF)

Accessible introduction to French culture through the study of selected examples of significant works in literature and the arts (understood in a broad sense). Works are examined in their social, historical, and ideological contexts and cover the period from the Middle Ages to the mid-20th century. All readings in English translation. IIB, IIIB. CAS-B-LIT.

FRE 177. Independent Studies. (0-5)

FRE 201. Intermediate French. (3)

Integrates intermediate-level language-skill development and study of cultural difference. Provides student to student interaction and addresses a broad range of cultural issues.

FRE 202. Critical Analysis of French Culture. (3) (MPF)

Second-semester, intermediate French course addresses literary and cultural issues through the study of short stories, poetry, film, journalism, and advertising. Works represent several French-speaking countries. Because texts, discussion, and compositions are in French, students continue to develop speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. IIB, IIIB. CAS-A.

FRE 212. Secular Jewish Culture From the Enlightenment to Zionism. (3) (MPF, MPT)

Surveys key aspects of secular Jewish culture, identity, thought, society & politics from mid 17th to mid 20th century. Significant treatment of Jewish life in Western Europe (France & Germany) and Eastern Europe; shorter treatment of Jewish experience in US & Mandate Palestine. Readings in English. IIB. CAS-B-Other Humanities.
Cross-listed with GER/RUS 212 and HST 211.

FRE 231. Comics and Culture in Belgium. (3-6; maximum 6)

Learn about Belgian cultural, artistic and linguistic traditions through the study of comics, graphic novels and their contexts while studying in Brussels, Belgium. Taught in English. Winter term only. CAS-B-HUM.

FRE 255. Visual Representations of the Holocaust. (3) (MPF)

Studying the Holocaust is a profound responsibility yet also presents a tangle of critical and philosophical questions. The role of visual representations in the process of Holocaust memorialization has been particularly contested. In this course, we will approach the question of the visualization of the Holocaust through various media: photography, cinema, TV, graphic novel, painting, and architecture. Visual technologies afford an unparalleled means of sustaining memory but are also susceptible to voyeurism and commodification. We will explore the potentialities and limitations of these media and grapple with critical ethical, epistemological and esthetic questions they raise. Course readings and class discussions in English. IIB. CAS-B.
Cross-listed with FST/GER.

FRE 265. European Jewish Cinema. (3) (MPT)

Survey of European films by Jewish filmmakers, or films dealing with Jewish themes, from 1920's to the present. Films with English subtitles. Readings and discussions in English.
Cross-listed with FST/GER.

FRE 277. Independent Studies. (0-5)

FRE 301. Culture & Interpretation. (3)

Gateway to upper-level offerings in French. Organized around a theme developed by each professor (for example: modernity, desire, revolution, or voyages), this class initiates students into the work of original analysis and creative interpretation. The course will include works from a variety of media, voices, and historical moments, from films to comics, speeches to sonnets, Paris to Algiers, Versailles to the street. Students will explore the relationships between literature and culture while gaining exposure to a range of approaches to, and theories of, reading. Students will hone their ability to present their ideas in writing. CAS-B-LIT.
Prerequisite: FRE 202.

FRE 302. Pre-Revolutionary Literature and Life. (3)

What is the relation between literature and life? How does life shape literature, and how does literature shape life? From the rowdy streets of Medieval Paris to the court of Versailles, from troubador love songs to the first modern novels, this introduction to French culture from the Middle Ages to the Revolution, explores literature as a live, engaged activity that provides a place to order, conceive, reimagine, and explore human and social experience. Course topics will change regularly, and can include issues such as ethics, space, bodies, medical discourses, legal discourses, trauma and witness, or insoluble problems. Alternatively, they may be organized around questions such as what is a subject? How are subjects related to collectivities? Systematic development of writing and speaking skills. Prerequesite: FRE 301. CAS-B-LIT.

FRE 303. Modern and Contemporary Literature and Life. (3)

From the Revolution of 1789 to the current day, France has weathered an astonishing array of governments (five republics, two empires, monarchies, Vichy); expanded colonial projects and decolonized; and hotly debated issues such as public education, the role of women and minorities in society, and the tensions between universalism and individual human rights. This introduction to French and Francophone culture from the Revolution to the current moment explores literature as a live, engaged activity that provides a place to order, conceive, reimagine, and explore human and social experience. Course topics will change regularly, and can include issues such as colonialism, ethics, space, bodies, medical discourses, legal discourses, trauma and witness or insoluble problems. Alternatively, they may be organized around questions such as what is a subject? How are subjects related to collectivities? Systematic development of writing and speaking skills. Prerequesite: FRE 301. CAS-B-LIT.

FRE 310. Texts in Context. (3) (MPT)

Examines ways creative texts (significant literary, historical, graphic, or architectural systems) are linked to various cultural contexts. Explores the ways in which cultural productions are interconnected to specific historical contexts in which they are created. Focuses on interrelations between cultural productions and their historical, sociological, scientific, or philosophical ramifications. Explains how French cultural discourse has regulated meaning of French texts and how these texts have changed institutions of cultural discourse. Systematic development of writing and speaking skills.
Prerequisite: FRE 301.

FRE 331. The European Graphic Novel. (3-6; maximum 6)

Europe has long been a creative center for the graphic novel. The course begins with study of the coalescence of the form in the early 19th century and its subsequent rapid spread throughout Europe and beyond. Focus will then shift to important recent examples of the graphic novel in Europe. The course is taught in English in Brussels, Belgium, a major European capital and a hub for current developments in the graphic novel. Winter term only. CAS-B-LIT.

FRE 339. Jews in Modern France: Between Image and Experience. (3)

The experience of Jews in modern France, and the figuration of "Jews" in the French cultural imaginary, have been complex and equivocal. In 1791, revolutionary France became the first European country to extend the right of citizenship to Jews. Yet France has also known deep currents of antisemitism. This ambivalence survives into the contemporary moment. In post-war French discourse, Jews have frequently been championed as the bearers of a deterritorialized, decentered, identity-less identity par excellence and, more recently, have been the targets of violence and vilified in ways that both break with and recall traditional antisemitism. In this course, we will explore the experience and the representation of Jews in French society and culture from before the French Revolution of 1789 to the present day in historical documents, novels, political cartoons, philosophical essays, historical scholarship, and films. Course readings and class discussions in English.
Cross-listed with HST.

FRE 340. Internship. (0-20)

FRE 341. Conversation and Current Events in France. (3) (MPT)

Focuses on the development of speaking, writing, and presentation skills based on current social and political events in France. Viewing and discussions of SCOLA (International News Programming by Satellite) programming are an integral part of the course.

FRE 341W. Conversation and Current Events in France. (3) (MPT)

Summer Program in Dijon, France. Focuses on the development of speaking, writing, and presentation skills based on current social and political events in France. Viewing and discussions of SCOLA (International News Programming by Satellite) programming are an integral part of the course.

FRE 350. Topics in French Literature in Translation. (3) (MPT)

Discussion of selected works that suggest particular thematic problems. For non-specialist with little or no background in French literary history. CAS-B-LIT.

FRE 361. French Pronunciation. (3)

Theoretical and practical study of French pronunciation. Corrective exercises, laboratory work.

FRE 366. French Cinema in Translation. (3) (MPT)

Critical survey of major directors, genres, and movements in French cinema. Particular attention devoted to development of film theory and criticism in France and their relation to film production. Screening of films by Renoir, Bresson, Bunuel, Godard, Truffaut, Varda, Resnais, Tavernier, and others. Taught in English; reading in English translation. CAS-B-LIT.
Cross-listed with FST.

FRE 377. Independent Studies. (0-5)

FRE 404/FRE 504. The French Renaissance. (3)

Study of major writers of prose and poetry in the French Renaissance, including Rabelais, Montaigne, Labe, Ronsard, and DuBellay.

FRE 410. Senior Seminar. (3) (MPC)

Required of all French majors in their senior year and open to qualified non-majors, this is a seminar on a selected topic in French literature designed to allow students to reflect upon what they have learned in previous French courses in order to further strengthen their powers of critical thinking and synthesis.
Prerequisite: senior standing; also, for majors: three 300-level courses and four 400- level courses (or four 300-level courses and three 400-level courses); for non-majors: three 300-level courses, three 400-level courses, and permission of instructor.

FRE 411/FRE 511. French Civilization. (3) (MPT)

Historical evolution of French society, its art, architecture, institutions and philosophical outlook.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

FRE 411D/FRE 511D. Tutorial in French Civilization. (3)

Offered only in Summer French Program in Dijon, France. Directed study of a selected topic concerning French culture with an emphasis on contemporary issues as they affect the Burgundy region. For students who have previously successfully completed FRE 411W/FRE 511W/511W.

FRE 411W/FRE 511W. French Civilization. (3) (MPT)

Summer French Program in Dijon, France. Historical survey of various aspects of French culture with special emphasis on local Burgundian civilization.
Prerequisite: FRE 202 or equivalent.

FRE 414/FRE 514. Art and Architecture in Dijon and Burgundy, France. (1-6; maximum 6)

Study the rich history and current state of art and architecture of Dijon and the Burgundy region within their contexts while on site in France. May include, for example, the study of cinema, comics, dance, music, painting, photography and sculpture. Includes field trips. May be repeated for credit. Topics vary.
Prerequisite: FRE 202 or equivalent with permission of the instructor.

FRE 415. Advanced Composition. (3)

Provides instruction in advanced French composition.

FRE 420/FRE 520. Topics in Bande dessinee, Cartoons and Caricature. (1-3; maximum 6)

Exploration of the history of French-language comics and related media, and analysis of form. Topics vary. Taught in French.

FRE 423/FRE 523. Theatre, Performance, Spectacle. (3)

Reading theater is, by definition, an incomplete act, for what makes a play theatrical is not the written script, but its performance to a group of spectators. This course considers the notion of "performativity" through an exploration of different modes and genres of theater and performance in French-language traditions. May include: plays from the middle ages to the 21st century; examples of performance art, music, dance, or opera; theories of theatre, performance, and spectacle from Aristotle to Artaud and Butler.

FRE 430/FRE 530. Topics in Early Modern French Literature. (1-3; maximum 6)

Thematic explorations of early modern French literature of all genres. Focus on critical and research methods and writing. CAS-B-LIT.
Prerequisite: FRE 301.

FRE 431/FRE 531. Studies in Contemporary French Thought in Translation. (3) (MPT)

Examination of major recent currents of French thought, such as existentialism, structuralism, and poststructuralism, with emphasis on their relation to the study of literary texts. Course content will vary. In English. CAS-B-LIT.
Prerequisite: junior or senior standing or permission of instructor.

FRE 442/FRE 542. Literary Innovation, 16th-18th C. (3)

Coincident with the evolving market and technology of printed books came an explosion of literary invention. Specific topics depend on the choice of the professor and may include early modern developments in poetry, the invention of French classical drama, prose from Montaigne's Essais to the experimental short forms of the 17th century, or novels and philosophical contes of the Enlightenment. CAS-B-LIT.

FRE 443/FRE 543. French Literature and Society. (3)

Introduction to the literature and society of Medieval France. Study of literary texts and works of art, and hands-on experience with medieval manuscripts and materials used to make them. Conducted in French.

FRE 451/FRE 551. Rebellions, Revolutions, and Avant-gardes. (3)

Analyzes the concept of revolution by examining one or more moments of upheaval and renewal, including political events such as the revolutions of 1789 and the nineteenth century, aesthetic avant-gardes such as romanticism or surrealism, scientific movements such as seventeenth-century optics or the rise of medicine, or technological discoveries such as the invention of the printing press and its implications for society. Taught in French. CAS-B-LIT.

FRE 452/FRE 552. The 19th Century. (3) (MPT)

Nineteenth-century France was wracked by multiple revolutions and changes of government, but it also transformed many of the bases of social life and led to a flowering in many of the arts. The century began with the vast Napoleonic expansion across Europe and ended with searching introspections about the notions of decadence and decay. In literature, it gave rise to what are arguably the greatest achievements in French lyric poetry and the novel. It created modern medicine both as a practice and a social force. It invented large-scale speculative capitalism and the modern city. This course will focus on exemplary aspects of nineteenth-century cultural production in France and may include literary, aesthetic, political, scientific, and philosophical trends. CAS-B-LIT.

FRE 453/FRE 553. Poetry. (3)

Exploration of French poetry and poetics. The course examines techniques and formal aspects of poetry, prosody and rhetoric, by focusing on certain authors and historical movements. It also analyzes the notion of the poetic as a way of envisioning and making sense of the world. CAS-B-LIT.

FRE 454/FRE 554. The Origins of the 20th Century. (3)

In the first years of the 20th century, Paris became a focal point and meeting place for various avant-garde artistic movements such as dada, cubism, and surrealism, many of which were born under the shadow of the First World War. With the rise of modernist urbanism, the city itself became a testing ground for ideas and ideologies that attempted to reenvision human nature. By the thirties, these totalizing visions of a human future largely divided between communism and fascism, and Paris, as a capital of ideas and immigration, became the battleground for competing, militant images of humanity. At the same time, the capital gazed out past the borders of France itself over an extensive colonial empire that returned vast riches at the cost of terrible moral and humanitarian injustices. This course will examine literary and other cultural works from this turbulent period to better understand the scope, meaning, and stakes of the French twentieth century. CAS-B-LIT.

FRE 460/FRE 560. Topics in French Cinema. (3) (MPT)

In-depth and concentrated study of French cinema. Focus on specific topics such as film's relation to society, its relation to the other arts and artistic movements, and its productive role as an object of philosophical thought. Topics may also include the work of particular directors, historical periods, and comparative social and aesthetic studies. Taught in English translation.
Prerequisite: FST 201 or FRE/FST 366.
Cross-listed with FST.

FRE 462/FRE 562. The 20th-Century Novel: Contemporary Explorations Beyond Existentialism. (3)

Study of the novel's most recent attempts to redefine itself. Texts include works by Celine, Leiris, Beckett, Robbe-Grillet, Queneau, Sarraute. CAS-B-LIT.

FRE 477. Independent Studies. (0-5)

FRE 480. Independent Reading for Departmental Honors. (1-6)

FRE 600. Seminar in French Literature. (1-4)

Intensive study of selected authors and critical perspectives. Offerings vary.

FRE 600B. Screen Environments. (1-4)

FRE 614. Introduction to French Literary Theory. (3)

Required of all French graduate students. An introduction to major movements and figures in French literary theory of the twentieth- and twenty-first centuries and to the practices of literary criticism.

FRE 617. Intensive Course for Graduate Students. (3)

A two-part course sequence that provides reading knowledge of French for graduate students in other disciplines. No speaking component in the courses. Vocabulary-building through reading, with emphasis on French grammar for recognition purposes. Readings of increasing difficulty with emphasis on idiomatic usage in students' disciplines.

FRE 618. Intensive Course for Graduate Students. (3)

A two-part course sequence that provides reading knowledge of French for graduate students in other disciplines. No speaking component in the courses. Vocabulary-building through reading, with emphasis on French grammar for recognition purposes. Readings of increasing difficulty with emphasis on idiomatic usage in students' disciplines.

FRE 677. Independent Studies. (0-5)

FRE 680. Independent Studies. (1-6)

Independent work in French literature or language.

FRE 689. TA Orientation Seminar. (1)

Required of new graduate assistants. Directly coordinated with organization of the beginning French course and deals with practical problems involved in this method of language instruction. Summer only. Cross-listed wtih SPN.

FRE 700. Research for Master's Thesis. (1-12; maximum 12)