History (HST)

Note:

  1. All history courses may be applied to CAS-B.
  2. The second unit of a two-semester course may be taken before the first unit; credit is given for any semester unit of HST 111, HST 112, HST 121, HST 122.

HST 111. Survey of American History. (3) (MPF)

Survey of the interplay of forces that have brought about evolutionary development of American economic, cultural, and political history from 1492 to the Era of Reconstruction, 1877. A functional and synoptic treatment of America's great historical problems. IIB. CAS-B.

HST 112. Survey of American History. (3) (MPF)

Survey of the interplay of forces that have brought about evolutionary development of American economic, cultural, and political history from 1877 to the present. A functional and synoptic treatment of America's great historical problems. IIB. CAS-B.

HST 121. Western Civilization. (3) (MPF)

Ideas, values, institutions, great events, and personalities in the development of European civilization from antiquity to 1500. Objective is to understand historically the major societal issues and cultural themes which have defined concepts of humanity and society in the Western world. IIB. CAS-B.

HST 122. Western Civilization. (3) (MPF)

Ideas, values, institutions, great events, and personalities in the development of European civilization from 1500 to the present. Objective is to understand historically the major societal issues and cultural themes which have defined concepts of humanity and society in the Western world. IIB. CAS-B.

HST 177. Independent Studies. (0-5)

HST 197. World History to 1500. (3) (MPF)

Introduction to the origins and early development of individual civilizations prior to the period of Western European hegemony. Stresses interdependency and interrelations among cultures, and compares social, political, and religious experiences of peoples with one another. IIB, IIIB. CAS-B.

HST 198. World History Since 1500. (3) (MPF)

Provides global perspective as well as introduction into history of individual civilizations. Stresses interrelations among societies and cultures and compares experiences of peoples and civilizations with one another. IIB, IIIB. CAS-B.

HST 202. History and Numbers. (3)

The course aims to teach basic quantitative skills through the lens of history. Students will learn how use numerical data to answer historical questions. Students will also study how societies have employed numbers in the past and understand that arithmetic has been valued as a fundamental skill throughout history. CAS-QL.

HST 206. Introduction to Historical Inquiry. (3)

Introduction to essential skills in investigating and interpreting the past. Course stresses active participation, writing, and intensive reading of primary documents and secondary literature. Required of (and limited to) History Majors.

HST 211. Secular Jewish Culture From the Enlightenment to Zionism. (3) (MPT)

Surveys key aspects of secular Jewish culture, identity, thought, society & politics from mid-17th to mid-20th century. Significant treatment of Jewish life in Western Europe (France & Germany) and Eastern Europe; shorter treatment of Jewish experience in US & Mandate Palestine. Readings in English. IIB. CAS-B-Other Humanities.
Cross-listed with FRE/GER/RUS 212.

HST 212. United States History since 1945. (3)

In-depth examination of political, social, economic, and cultural/intellectual developments in the U.S. since the end of World War II.

HST 213. Appalachia: Cultures and Music. (3)

History of country music since 1925 in context of Appalachian culture, regional modernization, and emergence of national media. Authenticity and cultural traditions, fans and artists, performance ceremonies, African American and gospel contributions, technological innovation in recording, radio, movies, and television. IC. CAS-B.
Cross-listed with AMS.

HST 214. History of Miami University. (3)

Miami University since 1809 from perspectives of local culture; national, social, and economic forces; and history of higher education. Key moments of change; continuity and difference through time; groups and traditions; architecture and landscape; influences of gender, class, race, and region.
Cross-listed with AMS.

HST 216. Introduction to Public History. (3)

Introduction to the major issues addressed by historians who work in the public sphere, with emphasis on the creation of a shared public past and the disciplines that comprise the field of public history.
Cross-listed with AMS.

HST 217. Modern Latin American History. (3)

Introduction to the major themes shaping Latin American history since independence, including US foreign policy; economic development; the discourses of race, ethnicity, class, and gender; cultural elements that either unite or distinguish Latin American countries.
Cross-listed with LAS.

HST 221. African-American History. (3) (MPT)

Survey of African-American history, concentrating upon the black experience in the United States. Black America from African origins to the 20th century. IC. CAS-B.
Cross-listed with BWS.

HST 222. U.S. Foreign Relations Since 1898. (3) (MPT)

Survey of U.S. foreign policy from 1898 to the present, with emphasis on issues of neutrality, isolationism, collective security, imperialism, the Cold War, nuclear policy, arms control, and relations with the Third World.

HST 224. Africa to 1884. (3) (MPF)

Survey course focusing on the changing historiography of Africa, African ancient civilizations, the emergence and development of the Bantu and Nilotes, Eastern Africa and the Orient, early Christianity and Islam, trans-Saharan trade, the medieval Sudanic Empires, statelessness and state formation, Africa and the West between 1400 and 1800, South Africa to 1870, the Mfecane, the Sudanic Jihads, long-distance trade, and African-European relations in the 19th century. IIB. CAS-B.
Cross-listed with BWS.

HST 225. The Making of Modern Africa. (3) (MPF)

Survey of the transformation of Africa, south of the Sahara, from the time of the scramble for, and partition of, the continent among European powers in the second half of the 19th century to the present. Emphasizes economic, social, cultural, political, and intellectual features. This is done through reading monographs, articles, and literary works (novels, plays, poems, etc.) on African experiences with colonialism, the rise and triumph of nationalism, African womanhood, popular culture and the experiences of change, and the rise and nature of post-colonial economic and political crises in the region. IIB. CAS-B.
Cross-listed with BWS.

HST 233. History of Christian Thought. (3)

A survey of the history of Christian thought that introduces the major intellectual issues throughout Christian history, including understandings of God, evil, human nature, and salvation. Examines the diversity in Christianity between and within Orthodox, Catholic, and Protestant traditions. Explores the interaction between intellectual developments and historical context.
Cross-listed with REL.

HST 236. Medicine and Disease in Modern Society. (3)

Explores the history of medicine and disease in Europe and America from the late eighteenth century to the present. The focus is on the rise of scientific medicine emphasizing the methods of social, intellectual, and cultural history. This approach rejects traditional progressionist accounts of the rise of scientific medicine and seeks to place medicine in a wider context. The predominant theme is that of the increasing influence of medical theory and medical institutions on society, and the growing concern of the state with public health. The course includes an exploration of the connections between medicine and ideas about class, race, gender, nation, and disease. This course requires no previous knowledge of modern history.

HST 241. Introduction to Islamic History. (3)

Introduction to medieval Islamic and Middle Eastern society, culture and political history from the Prophet Muhammad to the rise of the Ottomans.

HST 242. The History of the Modern Middle East. (3)

Introduction to pre-modern and modern Islamic and Middle Eastern society, culture and political history from the Ottomans to the present.

HST 243. History of the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1400s to 1800s. (3)

Development of European slaving activity in the African continent in the 15th through 19th centuries. Emphasis on the activities of Portuguese, Spanish, English, French and Dutch slavers, including the Middle Passage and also the less-studied slave trade in the Mediterranean and Indian Ocean. Identifies the economic forces, as well as the social consequences, of the ongoing slave trade.
Cross-listed with BWS and LAS.

HST 245. Making of Modern Europe, 1450-1750. (3) (MPF)

Survey of European history in global context from the Renaissance through the Enlightenment. Emphasis on political, cultural, and religious change in the first global age. Class also introduces students to the skills of historical thinking, and why they are essential to living in a global age. IIB, IIIB. CAS-B.

HST 246. Survey of Medieval History. (3) (MPT)

Formation of European Synthesis: from the crusades to 15th century.

HST 250. History and Popular Culture. (3)

Topical studies of historical imagery as presented in the popular communications media: best-selling fiction, documentaries, school texts, 'popular' histories, and especially film. Students may not take course more than once with same instructor.

HST 252. Representation of History in Film and Video. (3)

Attempts to familiarize students with ways that history is represented in film and video (as opposed to print). By comparing film to texts, analyzing narrative structure, and studying the techniques of film and video making, students learn how history is depicted in this medium. Introduces history of film by viewing and discussing works of several early directors who represented history. Films and directors selected for inclusion will vary from year to year.
Prerequisite: FST 201 recommended (not required).
Cross-listed with FST.

HST 253. Work, Wealth, and Power: U.S. Business and Labor History. (3)

Examines U.S. business and labor history in order to understand Americans' changing perceptions of wealth, work and power from the 1790s to the present. Topics include the the major economic transformations in American history; principles of scientific management; formation of class identity; productivity and the meaning of work; the structure of American capitalism and conceptions of the American Dream. Students will examine the ways in which U.S. business and labor practices have changed over time; the role capital and labor have played in shaping the nation's economic agenda and the political power wielded by manufacturing alliances and labor organizations.
Cross-listed with AMS.

HST 254. Introduction to Russian and Eurasian Studies. (3) (MPF)

Examines the major developments that have shaped Russian and Eurasian Culture, society and politics over the last millennium. The course incorporates perspectives from the social sciences, humanities and the fine arts. IIB. CAS-B.Cross-listed with ATH/CLS/ITS/POL/REL/RUS.

HST 260. Latin America in the United States. (3) (MPF)

Interdisciplinary examination of historical, social, economic, and cultural forces that have shaped the experience of peoples of Latin, Hispanic, Latino/a background in the United States. IC, IIB, IIIB. CAS-B.
Cross-listed with LAS.

HST 270. Topics in European History. (1-4; maximum 12)

Topics in European History. May be repeated when topic changes.

HST 271L. Western Heritage. (3)

Analyze the origins of the key values, attitudes and aspirations out of which the western World has emerged since the days of the Italian Renaissance.

HST 275. 20th Century European Diplomacy. (3) (MPT)

Examines the origins of World War I and World War II, the Cold War, European unity, decolonization, the fall of communism, and the Yugoslav conflict.

HST 277. Independent Studies. (0-5)

HST 290. Topics in American History. (1-4; maximum 12)

May be repeated when topic changes.

HST 296. World History Since 1945. (3) (MPF)

From Hiroshima to the Information Age. Focuses on the politics of identity and social history. Students taking this course may not earn credit for HST 398. IIB, IIIB. CAS-B.

HST 301. Age of Revolutions, Europe 1750-1850. (3)

Examines the causes of the French and Industrial Revolutions and explores how they changed the social, economic, political, and cultural fabric of a continent.
Prerequisite: none, but HST 122 recommended.

HST 304. History, Memory, Tradition. (3)

Examination of the role of history, memory, and tradition in American culture, and the theoretical underpinnings of public history.
Cross-listed with AMS.

HST 307. Latin American Civilization - Colonial Period. (3)

Spanish and Amerindian backgrounds, discovery, conquest, colonial institutions, and social development to the eve of independence.

HST 313. History of England to 1688. (3)

Life of the English people from the beginning of the Middle Ages to 1688.

HST 315. The Renaissance. (3) (MPT)

Intellectual developments of the period 1350-1550, set in their social, economic, and political contexts. Focuses on origins and development in Italy, but also looks to the movement's wider European context and impact. Topics include the 14th century crisis, humanism, the family, the debate between active and contemplative life, Renaissance court life, and the state as a work of art. Authors read include Petrarch, Kempe, Colonna, Valla, Castiglione, Machiavelli, Erasmus, More.

HST 316. The Age of the Reformation. (3)

The religious revolutions of the 16th century, both Protestant and Catholic, in their social, political, and religious contexts. Topics chosen from: medieval reform movements and heresies; popular religion; the debates over clerical celibacy, free will, and the priesthood; social discipline and the modern state; family and women; the missions to the New World; the witch craze and the Inquisition.
Cross-listed with REL.

HST 317. The Dutch Golden Age: The Netherlands in the Early Modern World. (3)

(3) History and culture of The Netherlands in the early modern world, 1550-1800, in global perspective.

HST 318. British Empire. (3)

Examines British Empire from the late 18th century to the 1960s. Emphasis is on the interaction of the peoples gathered into the Empire with their imperial rulers.

HST 319. Revolution in Latin America. (3)

History of modern Latin America through the experience of revolution in the 20th century. Focus on diverse expressions of political and social change with emphasis on Cuba, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Brazil.
Cross-listed with LAS.

HST 324. Eurasian Nomads and History. (3)

Examination of the nomads of the Eurasian steppes and their role in the civilizations of the Eurasian periphery, including China, the Near East, and Russia.

HST 325. Images of Africa. (3)

How have Africans and Europeans perceived each other? With what effects on action? Emphasizing the discussion method, this course explores relationship between African and European worlds and traces patterns of their relations from slave trade to the present day.
Cross-listed with BWS 324.

HST 326. After Alexander: The Hellenistic Age. (3)

(3) Society, politics and culture of the Hellenistic World from the campaigns of Alexander the Great to the rise of the Roman Empire.

HST 327. Ancient Rome: The Republic. (3)

History of the Roman Republic, from the overthrow of the kings and the leadership of the first consuls (509 BCE), to the creation of empire (264-167 BCE), and the civil strife (c. 130-31 BCE) which caused the republic's downfall and the rise of the emperors.

HST 328. Italy: Machiavelli to Mussolini. (3)

Explores Italian history from the end of the Renaissance, through the Baroque, the Enlightenment, Romanticism, and on to modernity. Addresses questions about culture and society, identity and nationality, art and politics, and about Italy's influence worldwide.

HST 330. Topics in European History. (1-4; maximum 9)

Topics in European history. May be repeated when topic changes.

HST 331. Industry and Empire: Europe from 1850 to 1914. (3)

Explores the period during which Europe came to control the political and economic destiny of much of the world. This was also the period in which great mass movements that were to dominate the 20th century were born, theoretical constructs of the social sciences were created, and a great blossoming of national literatures and cultures occurred. Particular attention paid to the attempts states made to cope with new social and economic dynamics of the industrial world, as well as socialism, nationalism, and anti-Semitism.

HST 332. Age of Dictators: Europe 1914-1945. (3) (MPT)

Focuses on the great crisis of 20th century European civilization, from the outbreak of war in August 1914 to the defeat of Hitler Germany in May 1945. Through novels and historical monographs, explores effects of total war and mass mobilization on the industrially advanced state systems of the period, as well as social emancipation, economic disintegration, and cultural innovation brought on by the great wars of the period. Attention paid to the experience of the "Great Powers" (Germany, the Soviet Union, Britain, and France).

HST 333. Reconstruction of Europe Since 1945. (3)

Examines how Europe came to be divided into two political spheres sustained by dueling military alliances. Focuses on political and economic reconstruction within the two blocs created by the Cold War divide, as well as new cultural impulses generated by changed realities of a shrunken and shattered Europe after 1945. Examines the revolutions of 1989, the fall of the Soviet Union, and process of European unification.

HST 336. Medicine and Disease in Pre-Industrial Society. (3)

Examines the influence of ancient medical traditions on medieval and early modern medicine, the formation of academic medicine in the Middle Ages, and the development of anatomy and ideas about the body. The predominant theme is the gradual emergence of "modern" medical institutions and structures including the professionalization of medical practice, the rise of hospitals and the nursing profession, and the concern of the state with public health. The influence of medicine on social structures and attitudes will also be explored, especially ideas about class, race, women and disease. This course requires no previous knowledge of medieval or early modern history.

HST 337. The United States and the Middle East. (3)

Examines the history of US foreign relations with nations in the Middle East from 1776 to the present.

HST 339. Jews in Modern France: Between Image and Experience. (3)

The experience of Jews in modern France, and the figuration of "Jews" in the French cultural imaginary, have been complex and equivocal. In 1791, revolutionary France became the first European country to extend the right of citizenship to Jews. Yet France has also known deep currents of antisemitism. This ambivalence survives into the contemporary moment. In post-war French discourse, Jews have frequently been championed as the bearers of a deterritorialized, decentered, identity-less identity par excellence and, more recently, have been the targets of violence and vilified in ways that both break with and recall traditional antisemitism. In this course, we will explore the experience and the representation of Jews in French society and culture from before the French Revolution of 1789 to the present day in historical documents, novels, political cartoons, philosophical essays, historical scholarship, and films. Course readings and class discussions in English.
Cross-listed with FRE.

HST 340. Internship. (0-20)

HST 342. Africa Since 1945. (3)

Addresses events and processes of change that informed sub-Saharan Africa after WWII, the meanings and experiences of decolonization, and the problems of political and economic development after independence.
Cross-listed with BWS.

HST 346. Medieval Jewish History. (3) (MPT)

Introduction to the history of the Jews of medieval Europe (the Ashkenaz) including Jewish culture, the beginnings of Christian persecution, and interactions and comparisons to Sephardic Jewish communities.

HST 347. Baghdad and the Abbasid Caliphate. (3)

(3) Consider the politics, religious history and social fabric of Baghdad, the capital of the Arab/Islamic Empire under the Abbasid caliphate, over the first 250 years of its history. Treats urbanism and urban society as a central feature of medieval Islamic and Near Eastern history over the same period.

HST 350. Topics in American History. (3; maximum 9)

May be repeated when topic changes.

HST 352. Medicine and Society in 20th Century Africa. (3)

Explores the place of medicine in the political, economic, and social history of Africa as well as African responses to changing patterns of disease, health and health care during the 20th century.
Cross-listed with BWS.

HST 353. History of Chinese Civilization. (3)

Survey of Chinese civilization, its origins and evolution in political institutions, economic activity, social structure, and cultural aspects from prehistory to 1840.

HST 354. Modern Chinese History. (3)

Survey of changes in institutions, ideas, economy and society in China's search for modernity from late imperial times (17th to 19th centuries) to the present.

HST 355. History of Modern Sport and National Identity. (3)

Examines the relationship between sports and national, regional, and local identities; sporting and relations between states; the process by which the world adopted or rejected Western games; and the impact of globalization on national sporting cultures, in the last two centuries. Topics include the history of Olympic Games, soccer's World Cup and the global proliferation of baseball and basketball.

HST 356. Modern Japanese History. (3)

Major issues in the history of Japan from mid-19th century to recent times such as the Meiji Restoration, the impact of the West, tradition and modernity, industrialization, social and cultural development, and wars and democracy.

HST 357. Gilded Age America. (3)

Covering the period between 1877 and about 1920, this course explores the political, economic, social, and cultural history of the era in the United States known as the Gilded Age, as well as Progressive Era responses to issues raised in that era. Pedagogy includes both lecture and hands-on experiential work with primary and secondary sources.
Cross-listed with AMS.

HST 359. Junior Honors Colloquium. (3)

Introduction to some of the issues involved in the conceptualization and writing of a major history project. Designed for students planning to write a thesis in history in the senior year.

HST 360. Topics in Interdisciplinary and Comparative History. (1-4; maximum 8)

HST 360C. History of WWI. (3)

This course explores the era of colonial rule after WWII and the emergence of new states and societies in Africa south of the Sahara. The main emphasis in the course is on the complex nature of social change in the region. We begin with a look at Africa under colonialism before World War II, then focus on the social factors that led to the rise of nationalist liberation movements and the changing policies of the colonial powers, follow the process of decolonization and conclude with the independence period from the 1960s to the present. The course is thus about Africans and how they resisted against - and engaged with - colonial projects: Western systems of education and therapeutic traditions; urban society and commodity capitalism; agriculture, environment and hunger; gender, sexuality and family life; leisure and popular culture; nationalism and de-colonization; and the political, economic, and cultural legacies of colonialism.

HST 361. Colonial America. (3)

Exploration and conquest of North America by Europeans and the development of English colonies to 1730.

HST 362. The Era of the American Revolution. (3)

Origins, events, and legacies of the American Revolution, with particular emphasis on political and social developments. CAS-B.
Cross-listed with AMS.

HST 363. The Early American Republic, 1783-1815. (3)

Emphasizes the Constitution, the Federalists, and the Jeffersonians with study of Washington, Madison, Hamilton, John Adams, and Jefferson as major figures.
Cross-listed with AMS.

HST 365. Civil War and Reconstruction Era. (3)

Origins and growth of sectionalism with emphasis on the period after 1850, secession and Civil War, Federal and Confederate governments, Reconstruction, and foreign issues.
Cross-listed with BWS.

HST 367. The United States in the 1960s. (3) (MPT)

Examines political, social, and cultural changes in the United States in the turbulent decade of the 1960s. Describes the consensus that existed in the 1950s, and then explores such topics as the civil rights movement, the women's movement, expansion of the welfare state, war in Vietnam, and the growth of a counterculture.
Cross-listed with AMS.

HST 368. United States from Progressive Era to Great Depression. (3)

Social, cultural, economic, and political developments associated with transformations of United States life and culture, 1890-1930.

HST 369. United States in the Modern Era. (3) (MPT)

Social, cultural, economic, and political developments in the United States from the New Deal to the present.

HST 371. Native American History to 1840. (3)

American Indian history from the period before European contact through the removal era of the 1830s and 1840s.
Cross-listed with AMS.

HST 372. Native American History since 1840. (3)

American Indian history from 1840 through the twentieth century and into the present. IC. CAS-B.

HST 374. History of the Russian Empire. (3) (MPT)

Key issues in Russian history, particularly the rise, growth, and stagnation of the vast multinational and multiconfessional Russian empire, the influence of other empires on Russia, the governance of vast territories, and the development of Russian imperial and national identities.

HST 375. The Soviet Union and Beyond. (3) (MPT)

Central problems and controversies in Russian history since 1917, among them: what produced the 1917 Revolution; how communism developed and collapsed; how Soviet citizens experienced communism; how Russian history changed after communism's collapse in 1991.

HST 377. Independent Studies. (0-5)

HST 378. 20th Century Eastern European History. (3)

Study of nationalism and struggle for independence in Eastern Europe, establishment of independent states after World War I, and return to foreign domination under the Nazis and the Soviets.

HST 379. U.S. Consumerism, 1890-Present. (3)

Examines the history of mass consumerism in North American society, including the rise of mass production and the mechanisms that have made mass-produced goods available to American and global markets.
Cross-listed with AMS.

HST 382. Women in American History. (3) (MPT)

Survey of the history of women's lives and roles in American society from colonial period to present. Emphasis on examining women's individual and collective roles in private and public spheres and on exploring how specific economic and political transformations have affected women's lives. IC. CAS-B.
Cross-listed with AMS/WGS.

HST 383. Women in Chinese History. (3) (MPT)

Survey of women's roles in the family and in political, economic, religious, and cultural lives of China from prehistory to the present. Various views about women in Chinese male-dominated society and development of feminist thought are discussed.

HST 385. Race, Science, and Disease in the Americas. (3)

Surveys a variety of debates over race and disease since the European overseas expansion to the Americas, particularly in those regions that developed plantation-based agriculture. Begins with the medical and scientific construction of ideas about race from the conquest to the eighteenth century. Places the development of racial theories of sickness and health in a broad social and political context, and, in particular, explains the medical salience of race in the settings of slavery and colonialism. Discussions will focus primarily on Latin America, the Caribbean, and the United States, but will also explore the making of knowledge about race in global setting.
Cross-listed with BWS/LAS.

HST 386. Race in U.S. Society. (3)

Examines the historical contexts within which major transformations in racial practices and policies have taken place and analyzes racialized customs and behaviors in the United States across time and place. IC. CAS-B.
Cross-listed with BWS.

HST 387. U.S. Constitutional Development to 1865. (3)

Development of state rights and nationalism from the framing of the Federal Constitution to 1865.

HST 388. U.S. Constitutional Development since 1865. (3)

Constitutional development since 1865 during wars and depressions and in conservative, reform, and liberal eras, with modern problems considered.

HST 392. Sex and Gender in American Culture. (3) (MPT)

Examination of change over time in the construction of sexual norms, attitudes, and behaviors in American culture, as well as of gender roles. Covers the period just prior to the Indian-European encounter through the present. IC. CAS-B.
Cross-listed with AMS/WGS.

HST 397. American Environmental History. (3)

Introduction to human-natural environment relationships in English North America and the United States, ca. 1600 to present. Chronological and regional approach with emphasis upon political economy and the American conservationist/environmentalist movement.
Cross-listed with AMS 397 and WST 397.

HST 400. Senior Capstone in History. (3; maximum 6) (MPC)

Provides intensive reading, research, and writing in selected topics. Each topic focuses on a specific problem or issue presented for analysis. Though requirements vary with topic, each Capstone involves active participation, both orally and in writing. Topics and descriptions are published annually in the department's course-offerings booklet. Take Capstones that build upon other classes taken. Required of all history majors.

HST 410/HST 510. Topics in Foreign Policy. (3; maximum 12)

Topics in foreign policy history and international history. May be repeated when topic changes.

HST 428. Russia's War and Peace. (3)

Discusses Russian history and culture in the Napoleonic era by using Leo Tolstoy's novel War and Peace as a guide.

HST 433/HST 533. Oral Tradition: History and Practice. (3)

Traces the use of oral tradition in historical writing and introduces theory and practice of oral history as a methodology basic to historical research.
Cross-listed with AMS.

HST 434/HST 534. China along the Silk Road before 1600. (3)

Examines the role the transcontinental Silk Road played in Chinese history, including the development of the Road, its role in China's foreign relations, the impact of foreign trade, and the spread of cultures and religions.

HST 435/HST 535. Public History Practicum. (3)

Combines classroom study and fieldwork in the community. Students examine the presentation of history to the public, curriculum and public institutions, and issues of public culture to develop projects that incorporate work with a local museum or historical society and a local classroom teacher.
Cross-listed with AMS.

HST 436/HST 536. Havighurst Colloquium. (3)

Exploration of significant issues related to Russian and post communist affairs. Each semester focuses on a central theme or topic that is examined through presentations, readings, research, discussion, and writing. May be repeated once for credit with only 3 hours counting towards the history major.
Cross-listed with ATH/RUS 436/RUS 536; CLS 436; POL 440/POL 540 and REL 470A.

HST 437. Latin America Environmental History. (3)

Human and natural environment relationships in Latin America from first migrations to the present.
Cross-listed with LAS.

HST 442. Ancient Jewish History. (3) (MPT)

Ancient history of the Jewish people from the Persian through the Greco-Roman periods (539 BCE-200 CE).

HST 450/HST 550. Topics in Women's History. (3; maximum 12) (MPT)

In-depth study of a selected topic in the history of women, focusing on either a specific period and place, or a theme.
Cross-listed with WGS.

HST 452/HST 552. Florence in the Time of the Republic, 1250-1550. (3) (MPT)

Few European city-states have aroused as much comment from contemporaries and historians as the Republic of Florence. Begins with the emergence of the popular commune (1250), continues through the crisis of the 14th century (plague, depression, workers' revolts), the Medici family domination, foreign invasions, and the fall of the republic. Special attention to the myth of the 'Renaissance' and Florence's role in the creation of that myth. Topics include: political theory, including Machiavelli's Prince and Discourses; banking and business; the definition of community through civic religion; families and clans; art and architecture; ritual behavior and the definition of people marginal to society.

HST 459. Historicizing the News. (3)

Focuses on ways to use history to deepen and contextualize understanding of contemporary events and trends. Emphasis on skills development in information literacy, conducting targeted research, and using writing to meet the needs of various audiences.

HST 470/HST 570. Topics in Russian History. (3-4) (MPT)

HST 472. Germany 1918-1945. (3) (MPT)

Adolf Hitler, the Weimar Republic, and the Third Reich, 1918-1945.

HST 477. Independent Studies. (0-5)

HST 480. Departmental Honors. (1-6; maximum 6)

Departmental honors may be taken in one or more semesters of the student's senior year.

HST 482. Russian, Eastern European and Eurasian Summer Workshop. (3-6; maximum 12)

A three-week study tour (taught in English) will be an intensive study of the history, politics, and culture of this area. The location of the trip may vary from year to year. Students examine the intersection of religion, literature, film, visual arts, history, politics and/or architecture. The tour will visit major historical and cultural sites and hear lectures from local specialists. Recommended prerequisites: REL/RUS 133 or ATH/HST/REL/RUS 254.
Cross-listed with ATH/REL/RUS.

HST 495. Modern African Environmental History. (3)

Offers a multidisciplinary approach to the social, economic, and political aspects of environmental change in sub-Saharan Africa. Explores the utility of social science and historical analyses for understanding long-term changes in the region's environment. Concerned with the way the idea of development has been conceptualized and applied in the region in the last 100 or so years. Considers how Africans perceived and responded to environmental crises in the 20th century.
Cross-listed with BWS.

HST 601. Historical Methods. (3)

Introduction for beginning graduate students to the practice of history.

HST 602. History and Theories. (3)

Introduction to theories and models of the practice of history in the last century.

HST 603. Research Seminar I. (3)

Required course, which gives students an opportunity to conduct research in primary and secondary sources in a field of interest, complete a prospectus and a bibliography or source list, and set out a research and writing plan. The course is designed as well to prepare students for HST 604 to be taken subsequently.

HST 604. Research Seminar II. (3)

Required course and must be taken in sequence with HST 603. Students are required to write a finished paper of between 20 and 25 pages that is based on their research but which is independent of the final project.

HST 611. Prospectus Workshop. (1)

This course is meant to instruct and assist students as they prepare a prospectus for their Masters thesis or project.

HST 612. Thesis Workshop. (1)

This course is meant to instruct and assist students as they prepare/write their Masters thesis or project.

HST 645. College Teaching of History Surveys. (0)

HST 670. Colloquium in History. (3)

Reading and discussion of major works on selected topics. Colloquium may be taken more than once if topic changes.

HST 677. Independent Studies. (0-5)

HST 700. Research for Master's Thesis. (1-12; maximum 12)

HST 730. Examination Hours. (1-12; maximum 6)

Limited to masters’ students taking the examination (Non-thesis) option.