Nonprofit and Community Studies (NCS)

NCS 201. Theories of Civic Leadership and Democracy. (3)

Critical introduction to the study of community, democracy, and civic leadership. Draws widely from several scholarly fields (including political science, philosophy, economics, international development and civic engagement), placing particular emphasis on the various ways that scholars and practitioners conceptualize "community" and "democracy" and the ways that theories of democratic citizenship can inform the actions and practices of individuals, leaders, and groups within communities.

NCS 202. Introduction to Nonprofits and NGOs. (3)

Overview of the history, organization, and functions of nonprofits and NGOs, one of the largest sectors of the United State workforce. Visiting professionals from community agencies provide local connections and context, and service-learning experience allows students to engage and learn in additional environments.

NCS 270. Special Topics in Community Studies. (1-6; maximum 9)

An examination of a contemporary problem/issue in community studies through some combination of research, readings, discussion, and experiential learning. Topics will vary according to need and interest. This class may be repeated for credit provided different topics are studied.

NCS 277. Independent Studies. (0-5)

NCS 301. Community-Based Practicum I. (3)

Placement with an appropriate community or government agency where students apply their skills and learn new ones. Preparatory classroom component, regular reflection assignments, and community project required.
Prerequisite: NCS 202.

NCS 302. Community-Based Practicum II. (3)

Placement with an appropriate community or government agency where students apply their skills and learn new ones. Preparatory classroom component, regular reflection assignments, and community project required.
Prerequisite: NCS 301.

NCS 377. Independent Studies. (0-5)

NCS 401. Capstone in Nonprofit and Community Studies. (3) (MPT, MPC)

Focuses on the production of a senior project in collaboration with an appropriate community partner. As part of the Global Miami Plan, it emphasizes sharing of ideas, synthesis, and critical, informed action and reflection, and includes student initiative in defining and investigating problems or projects. Culminates in a public presentation for community and university members. IC.
Prerequisite: 96 hours registered or earned (senior standing).