Department of Architecture and Interior Design

Architecture + Interior Design

Architecture: Bachelor of Arts in Architecture

This pre-professional degree program prepares graduates to enter a professional graduate program to become a registered/licensed architect or to enter an architectural field at a pre-professional level. Miami offers a graduate program that leads to the professional degree Master of Architecture.

First- and second-year courses introduce the basics of architecture and the range of opportunities available in the field. Third- and fourth-year courses focus on advanced architectural design, landscape, and urban design. Throughout the program, you are exposed to the interdisciplinary nature of architecture.

For information, contact the Department of Architecture + Interior Design, 101 Alumni Hall, 513-529-7210.

Interior Design: Bachelor of Fine Arts

This professional degree program prepares graduates to enter the interior design field or a graduate program in interior design, architecture, or a related discipline.

The curriculum promotes competency in fundamental design, design process, and visual communication, and an understanding of interior materials and systems, history and theory, and professional procedures. Graduates integrate the various aesthetic, social, technical, and graphic requirements of interior design problems.

The program balances liberal learning with a comprehensive professional education. It emphasizes interdisciplinary learning (reflective of the discipline and of trends in practice) by requiring several courses outside the major and by emphasizing interdisciplinary courses and projects. The program promotes independent, self-directed course work and research, with the intention of developing in the student a specialized knowledge as a complement to a broad-based, generalized understanding of the discipline.

For information, contact the Department of Architecture + Interior Design, 101 Alumni Hall, 513-529-7210.

Architecture + Interior Design: Special Admission Requirements

Admission is possible only in the fall semester. The applicant must meet all curricular requirements mandated by the university for entering students. Courses in studio art or other creative areas (music, drama, creative writing) are strongly encouraged because they help the student develop creative potential as well as critical judgment.

Evidence of creative aptitude must be submitted in the form of a portfolio, due by the same deadline date as other admission materials. A departmental visit is highly recommended. The departmental admissions committee will evaluate your scholastic achievements and general academic profile in addition to the evidence of creativity revealed in the portfolio submission. Please contact the Department of Architecture + Interior Design for further information, or review portfolio submission guidelines online.

To transfer, you must meet the above criteria (including portfolio submission) and should have a minimum 3.00 cumulative GPA. Advanced standing for accepted transfer students is dependent on the strength of the student's academic profile, the portfolio, and available space. Transfers after the second year are generally restricted to students coming from other undergraduate professional or pre-professional architecture and interior design programs.

National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) Statement

The following statement is required by the NAAB.

In the United States, most state registration boards require a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes three types of degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture, the Master of Architecture, and the Doctor of Architecture. A program may be granted a 6-year, 3-year, or 2-year term of accreditation, depending on the extent of its conformance with established educational standards.

Doctor of Architecture and Master of Architecture degree programs may consist of a pre-professional undergraduate degree and a professional graduate degree that, when earned sequentially, constitute an accredited professional education. However, the pre-professional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree.

The Department of Architecture + Interior Design at Miami University offers the following NAAB-accredited degree programs:

  • Master of Architecture II (pre-professional degree + 60 graduate credits)
  • Master of Architecture III (non-pre-professional degree + 105 graduate credits)
  • Next accreditation visit for all programs: 2023

Special Curriculum Requirements

Change of Major Within Department

During the spring semester of the first year in the program, majors in architecture or interior design may apply to the alternate major. Internal applicants will be given first priority as available spots are filled.

Advancing to Upper-class Standing

Your work is reviewed at the close of your first, second, and third years. Regardless of grades in individual courses, the faculty may deny a student further registration as a major in the department if they conclude this is in the student’s best interest. In this event, it may be possible for a student to apply for change to another program in the College of Creative Arts or another academic division and, subject to regulations of that division, continue to register for certain courses in architecture on an elective basis.

Departmental Honors

You are eligible to graduate with departmental honors if you meet the following conditions.

  1. Cumulative GPA of 3.50 or better.
  2. Significant contribution to one or more of the following:
    • Enhancement of departmental life. This may include assisting in lower-division courses as an undergraduate associate, serving as an officer in a student organization such as AIAS, IIDA, APX, or SAC, or working on student-initiated departmental activities.
    • Advanced research effort. This may include helping faculty with research projects or undertaking an independent research project (e.g., Undergraduate Summer Scholar program).
    • Socially responsive volunteering. This may include assisting organizations such as Habitat for Humanity or Over-the-Rhine Community Housing, preferably in an architectural capacity, or collaborating with faculty in similar efforts beyond minimum classroom requirements.

Admission to Graduate Program

If you intend to continue into a Master of Architecture program, three of your four junior and senior design studios must focus on building design, and it is advisable to take support courses that will be required as prerequisites at the graduate level. Prerequisites for Miami’s Master of Architecture program include ARC 410/ARC 510, ARC 417/ARC 517, and ARC 418/ARC 518. See the Courses of Instruction section in this Bulletin for the Master of Architecture degree and consult with your advisor.

 

Architecture & Interior Design Courses

ARC 101. Beginning Design Studio. (5)

Introduction to spectrum of influences which determine environmental form. Emphasis placed upon development of understanding and appreciation of our man-made environment. Methods of communication and development of visual vocabulary capable of understanding and expressing three-dimensional form and space emphasized. Open to majors only.

ARC 102. Beginning Design Studio. (5)

Introduction to spectrum of influences which determine environmental form. Emphasis placed upon development of understanding and appreciation of our man-made environment. Methods of communication and development of visual vocabulary capable of understanding and expressing three-dimensional form and space emphasized. Open to majors only.

ARC 103. Shop Methods and Materials. (1.5)

An exploration and study of building materials and the tools and techniques used to shape them.
Co-requisite: ARC 101, ARC 501, ARC 601, and ARC 701.

ARC 105. Introduction to Architecture. (3)

Introduction to spectrum of influences which determine environmental form. Emphasis placed upon development of understanding and appreciation of our man-made environment. Methods of communication and development of visual vocabulary capable of understanding and expressing three-dimensional form and space emphasized. Course supports transfers into Architecture + Interior Design, and others interested in exploring Architecture + Interior Design as majors.

ARC 107. Global Design. (3) (MPF)

Introduces the role and influence of design on people and environments within a contemporary global context. Open to students in all majors. IIA, IIIB.

ARC 113. Methods of Presentation, Representation and Re-Presentation. (2)

Introduction to various graphic media as tools of environmental design. Emphasis is placed on use and integration of traditional and digital media as tools of 3-dimensional analysis and synthesis in design process and representation. Includes orthographics, perspective, sketching, drafting, photography, rendering, and web design. Open to majors only.

ARC 114. Methods of Presentation, Representation and Re-Presentation. (2)

Introduction to various graphic media as tools of environmental design. Emphasis is placed on use and integration of traditional and digital media as tools of 3-dimensional analysis and synthesis in design process and representation. Includes orthographics, perspective, sketching, drafting, photography, rendering, and web design. Open to majors only.

ARC 177. Independent Studies. (0-5)

ARC 188. Ideas in Architecture. (3) (MPF)

Study of the relationship between architecture and the cultural, social, and environmental contexts in which it exists through selected historical and contemporary examples. Primarily intended for no-nmajors. (Does not meet requirements for major in Architecture or Interior Design). IIA, IIB. CAS-B.

ARC 201. Architecture Studio. (5)

Design of the environment as a creative process requiring a language and methods similar yet distinct from other arts. Design projects in man-made environment at different scales, and in natural and man-made environment interface. Introduction to paths in the environmental design curriculum and career opportunities. Open to majors only.
Prerequisite: ARC 101-102.

ARC 202. Architecture Studio. (5)

Design of the environment as a creative process requiring a language and methods similar yet distinct from other arts. Design projects in man-made environment at different scales, and in natural and man-made environment interface. Introduction to paths in the environmental design curriculum and career opportunities. Open to majors only.
Prerequisite: ARC 101-102.

ARC 203. Interior Design Studio. (5)

Introductory problems in interior design integrating aesthetic, social, technical, and graphic communication requirements. Emphasis on design theory, process, programming, and human factors. Focus on residential and small-scale commercial building types. Open to majors only.
Prerequisites: ARC 101-102.

ARC 204. Interior Design Studio. (5)

Introductory problems in interior design integrating aesthetic, social, technical, and graphic communication requirements. Emphasis on design theory, process, programming, and human factors. Focus on residential and small-scale commercial building types. Open to majors only.
Prerequisites: ARC 101-102.

ARC 211. Introduction to Landscape and Urban Design. (3)

Introduction to principles and elements of the larger environment: landscape and urban design. Co-requisite for architecture majors: ARC 202; co-requisite waived for nonmajors.

ARC 212. Principles of Environmental Systems. (3) (MPF)

Understanding of the basic principles that inform the design of environmental and structural systems and their integration into building design. V.
Co-requisite: ARC 211, ARC 201 or 203; co-requisite and prerequisite waived for nonmajors.

ARC 213. Graphic Media III. (2)

Introduction to the use of graphic media as tools of architectural design. Emphasis placed on the integration of traditional and digital media in the design process. Includes CAD, rendering techniques, perspective, sketching and modeling.
Prerequisites: ARC 113 and ARC 114.
Co-requisite: ARC 201 or 203.

ARC 214. Graphic Media IV. (2)

Introduction to the use of graphic media as tools of architectural design. Emphasis placed on the integration of traditional and digital media in the design process. Includes 3-D modeling and rendering software, advanced rendering techniques, perspective sketching and modeling.
Prerequisites: ARC 113, ARC 114, and ARC 213.
Co-requisite: ARC 202 or 204.

ARC 221. History of Architecture I. (3) (MPF)

Thorough and systematic survey of the history of architecture, urban design, and allied arts across global contexts. Non-majors welcome. IIA, IIB.

ARC 222. History of Architecture II. (3) (MPF)

Thorough and systematic survey of the history of architecture, urban design, and allied arts across global contexts. Non-majors welcome. IIA, IIB.

ARC 225. Design: Behavior, Perception, Aesthetics. (3)

Study of perception and psychological response to the built environment. Emphasis on cultural differences, design for special populations, ergonomics, and anthropometrics.

ARC 277. Independent Studies. (0-5)

ARC 301. Architecture Studio. (6)

Study of design processes and methods of implementation in the solution of architectural and other environmental design problems at an intermediate level of complexity.
Prerequisite: ARC 201-202; open to majors only.

ARC 302. Architecture Studio. (6)

Study of design processes and methods of implementation in the solution of architectural and other environmental design problems at an intermediate level of complexity.
Prerequisite: ARC 201-202; open to majors only.

ARC 303. Interior Design Studio. (6)

Intermediate problems in interior design integrating aesthetic, social, technical, and graphic communication requirements. Emphasis on retail, institutional, hospitality, and preservation and reuse project types.
Prerequisite: ARC 203-204 or ARC 201-202; open to architecture majors with approval of instructor.

ARC 304. Interior Design Studio. (6)

Intermediate problems in interior design integrating aesthetic, social, technical, and graphic communication requirements. Emphasis on retail, institutional, hospitality, and preservation and reuse project types.
Prerequisite: ARC 203-204 or ARC 201-202; open to architecture majors with approval of instructor.

ARC 309. Furniture Design and Construction. (3)

Exploration of the process of designing, detailing, and constructing furniture and millwork. Introduction to the materials of architectural millwork and the technologies of construction. Studio exercises provide experience in both design and execution of furniture and millwork.
Prerequisite: third-year standing or approval of instructor; required for interior design majors; open to nonmajors with approval of instructor.

ARC 321. History of Interiors. (3)

Thorough and systematic survey of interior design from prehistoric times to present. Emphasis on the social and cultural influences on the design and evolution of interior environments.
Prerequisite: ARC 221-222.

ARC 340. Internship. (0-20; maximum 3)

ARC 377. Independent Studies. (0-5)

ARC 401. Architecture Studio. (6)

Study of design processes and methods of implementation in the comprehensive solution of complex environmental design problems.
Prerequisite: ARC 301-302; open to majors only.

ARC 402. Architecture Studio. (6)

Study of design processes and methods of implementation in the comprehensive solution of complex environmental design problems.
Prerequisite: ARC 301-302; open to majors only.

ARC 402C. Senior Studio Capstone Experience. (6) (MPC)

This is a culminating studio in which the exploration of professional issues is placed in dialogue with questions raised by liberal learning. Students will be expected to examine how technical and aesthetic issues interact with professional, social, political, and cultural issues. A weekly seminar component will treat a common set of readings selected to help students compare their discoveries and interrogate their perceptions about their work.
Prerequisite: Intended for architecture majors who have completed 7 semesters of design studio; students with extensive training and background in related design areas may petition the studio faculty for admission and selection will be based on the strength of an interview and a design portfolio.

ARC 403. Interior Design Studio. (6)

Comprehensive studio integrating all programmatic, technical, and professional requirements of a complex project. Emphasis on space planning, systems furniture design, and the preparation of construction drawings and specifications for a commercial office project. Open to architecture majors with approval of instructor.
Prerequisites: ARC 303, 304 or ARC302.

ARC 404/ARC 504. Seminars. (1-3)

Courses in three of the primary curricular areas: communication process; history and theory; environmental systems/practice. Offerings vary. May include: housing, contemporary architecture theory and practice, vernacular architecture, urban studies, architectural theory, exploration of graphic media, advanced work in building systems, etc. Seminar descriptions available at departmental office during preregistration each semester. Nonmajors encouraged to seek course work in their area of interest.

ARC 404Y. Mind and Medium. (3)

Courses in three of the primary curricular areas: communication process; history and theory; environmental systems. Offerings vary. May include: housing, contemporary architecture theory and practice, vernacular architecture, urban studies, architectural theory, exploration of graphic media, advanced work in building systems, etc. Seminar descriptions available at departmental office during preregistration each semester.
Cross-listed with IMS.

ARC 405/ARC 505. Seminars. (1-3)

Courses in three of the primary curricular areas: communication process; history and theory; environmental systems/practice. Offerings vary. May include: housing, contemporary architecture theory and practice, vernacular architecture, urban studies, architectural theory, exploration of graphic media, advanced work in building systems, etc. Seminar descriptions available at departmental office during preregistration each semester. Nonmajors encouraged to seek course work in their area of interest.

ARC 405C. Typology and Regionalism. (3)

ARC 405G. Gothic Architecture. (3) (MPT)

ARC 405Q. Housing Case Studies. (3)

ARC 405Y. Frank Lloyd Wright and Modernism. (3) (MPC)

This course investigates the new scholarship on Wright in conjunction with an in depth and interdisciplinary examination of his biography, buildings, and writings in a broad artistic, sociopolitical, historical, and cultural context. Each student will conduct a research project from the viewpoint of the student's disciplinary training. Students from all majors are welcome.

ARC 406/ARC 506. Seminars. (1-3)

Courses in three of the primary curricular areas: communication process; history and theory; environmental systems/practice. Offerings vary. May include: housing, contemporary architecture theory and practice, vernacular architecture, urban studies, architectural theory, exploration of graphic media, advanced work in building systems, etc. Seminar descriptions available at departmental office during preregistration each semester. Nonmajors encouraged to seek course work in their area of interest.

ARC 406B. Energy and Sustainability. (1)

ARC 406C. Sustainable Design Case Study. (3)

ARC 408. Interior Design Studio. (6) (MPC)

Summative studio integrating liberal learning and specialized knowledge in a single, complex project of the student's choosing. Open to interior design majors only.
Prerequisite: ARC 403.

ARC 410/ARC 510. Statics & Strengths of Materials. (3)

An introduction to two dimensional engineering statics and mechanics of materials. Topics covered include the study of rigid bodies in static equilibrium and the study of the mechanics of materials with emphasis on stress and strain relationships.

ARC 411/ARC 511. Structural Design. (3)

Development of basic applied knowledge in the design of structural elements and systems using common constructional materials in accordance with relevant code requirements.
Prerequisite: ARC 410/ARC 510.

ARC 412/ARC 512. Structural Design. (3)

Development of basic applied knowledge in the design of structural elements and systems using common constructional materials in accordance with relevant code requirements.
Prerequisite: ARC 410/ARC 510.

ARC 413/ARC 513. Environmental Systems I. (3)

Understanding of the basic principles that inform the design of environmental systems, with an emphasis on the building envelope and energy-efficient systems, heat gain and loss, alternative energy systems, the design and integration of climate control systems (heating, ventilating, air-conditioning), and plumbing and fire prevention systems.

ARC 414/ARC 514. Environmental Systems II. (3)

Understanding of the basic principles that inform the design of environmental systems, with an emphasis on lighting and power/data systems. Course topics include acoustics, life-safety systems, and building service systems.

ARC 417/ARC 517. Architectural Materials. (3)

Introduction to materials and criteria for selection in architectural structures.
Prerequisite: ARC 212.

ARC 418/ARC 518. Construction Methods. (3)

Systematic approach to construction. Investigation of systems, concepts, and system building.
Prerequisite: ARC 417/ARC 517.

ARC 419. Materials of Interior Design. (3)

Exploration of the various materials and finishes available to the interior designer, their inherent characteristics, and the ways in which they can be combined into construction assemblies. Emphasis on interior finish materials and textiles.
Prerequisite: ARC 417/ARC 517 or permission of instructor.

ARC 422/ARC 522. History of Urbanization. (3)

A study of the systematic evolution of urban societies and places. The course will examine the evolution of the physical, social and economic components of urban societies from the protoneolitic village settlements to the development of the industrial city. Theory will be explored through case studies.

ARC 424/ARC 524. Seminar on Modern Architecture in Latin America. (3)

The course combines general background readings on the subject with specific readings on a selected group of countries, architects and projects based on a thematic organization. The faculty presents introductory lectures, while class members will present the results of individual and team research and analysis as assigned. Some of the analysis will be graphical, some will be written; all presentations will require illustrations of the work(s) in question.
Cross-listed with LAS.

ARC 426/ARC 526. Architecture and Society. (3) (MPC)

Examination of the relation between design professions and varying social-economic orders, with special emphasis given to the effect of this order on theory and practice of architecture.

ARC 427/ARC 527. The American City Since 1940. (3) (MPT)

Examination of the American city and its physical transformation since 1940. Studies how different experiences of the city are conditioned by issues of class, race, gender, culture. IC.
Cross-listed with BWS.

ARC 435/ARC 535. Theory and History of Landscape Architecture. (3)

Examination of the role of the landscape architect in the environmental design process through discussion of history, methodology, and practice of contemporary landscape design.

ARC 436. Independent Research & Programming. (3)

Seminar course focuses on the cultivation and discipline necessary to conduct independent research investigating real-world issues from multiple perspectives, including gathering, analyzing, and synthesizing information from various sources in order to develop credible and valid evidence-based arguments (qualitiative and quantitative research) as foundation for design decision-making. Course designed in tandem with ARC408 Interior Design Studio; this course provides the research framework to deeply explore a topic, problem, or issue of individual interest, and to develop a formal project proposal (scope, size, scale, location, program, design intention, etc.) that will serve as the basis for a highly developed interior design solution for a complex facility in the spring interior design (capstone) studio.
Prerequisite: ARC 304.

ARC 441/ARC 541. Professional Practice. (3)

Awareness of current legal problems and professional ethics relative to handling building projects from feasibility studies through development drawings, contract documents, bidding, and construction observation.
Prerequisite: fourth year standing.

ARC 444. Professional Practice in Interior Design. (3)

Investigation of processes, practices, and ethics involved in interior design profession. Course emphasizes integration of specifications, cost estimating, office and project management, and contract writing into the design process.
Prerequisite: fourth-year standing or approval of instructor.

ARC 451/ARC 551. Contemporary Architectural Theory and Practice. (3)

This seminar explores and critiques contemporary theories and practices that inform current domestic and global architectural works by considering the intellectual, cultural, and technological forces that shape them.

ARC 452/ARC 552. Recent Architecture Theory. (3)

This seminar is designed to give students an understanding of the theory underlying contemporary architecture and its forms and to develop critical thinking about the relationship between history, form and the philosophical climate which gave rise to the ideals of Modernism and its legacies.

ARC 477. Independent Studies. (0-5)

ARC 490/ARC 590. Independent Studies. (1-3)

ARC 581. Architectural Design Studio. (6)

Design Studio for M.Arch. Graduate Students.

ARC 582. Architectural Design Studio. (6)

Design Studio for M.Arch. Graduate Students.

ARC 583. Architectural Design Studio. (6)

Design Studio for M.Arch. Graduate Students.

ARC 601. Architecture Studio. (6)

Professional-level architectural studio; variable topics.

ARC 602. Architecture Studio. (6)

Professional-level architectural studio; variable topics.

ARC 612. Graphic Media I. (2)

Begins the graphic media sequence for 500 level graduate studio students. Demonstrates 2-D hand based graphic tools and 3D techniques as design strategies that encompass creative expressivity, design analysis and representation through analytical, orthographic, and speculative drawings, media, and models. In addition to skill based learning objectives, ARC 612 introduces architecture design communication based in design history and contemporary theory.
Co-requisite: ARC 581 or approval of instructor required.

ARC 613. Graphic Media II. (2-3; maximum 3)

Course taken in the Fall in conjunction with ARC582 studio. Objective includes the full breadth of design communication techniques such as hand-based processes, digital 2D processes and 3D modeling and introduces modeling software, as well as time-based processes such as video, animation and web presentation techniques. In addition to skill based learning objectives, ARC613 supports architecture design communication based in history and contemporary theory. The graphic media sequence of ARC 612, ARC 613, ARC 614 encompass creative expressivity, design analysis and representation through analytical, orthographic, and speculative drawings, media, and models.

ARC 614. Graphic Media III. (2-3; maximum 3)

Course completed in Spring in conjunction with ARC583 studio. Objective continues the full breadth of design communication techniques such as hand-based processes, digital 2D processes and 3D modeling and modeling software, as well as time-based processes such as video, animation and web presentation techniques. In addition to skill based learning objectives, ARC614 supports architecture design communication based in history and contemporary theory. The graphic media sequence of ARC612, ARC613, ARC614 encompass creative expressivity, design analysis and representation through analytical, orthographic, and speculative drawings and models.

ARC 621. History of Architecture I. (3)

Thorough and systematic survey of the history of architecture, urban design, and allied arts across global contexts.

ARC 622. History of Architecture II. (3)

Thorough and systematic survey of the history of architecture, urban design, and allied arts across global contexts.

ARC 634. Architectural Theory. (3)

Introduction to techniques and procedures involved in methodical architectural research. Each student undertakes research project on a particular aspect of design. Open to majors only.

ARC 636. Design & Research Methods. (3)

Essentials of architectural and cultural theory and possible research methods in support of theses and scholarly activity.

ARC 677. Independent Studies. (1-5)

ARC 690. Independent Studies. (1-3)

ARC 700. Thesis Coursework. (1-9)

Students in the M.Arch.II and M.Arch.III programs are required to develop a thesis that contains both a written and a design component. Students pursue this research independently in the context of a committee that typically includes a chair and at least one reader during the summer between the ARC 600 and ARC 700 studio levels and into the fall term. ARC 700 serves as an independent study research course directed by the student's thesis mentor leading toward the development of a professional journal format paper and design project reviewed by a jury of professionals.

ARC 701. Pre-Thesis Design Studio. (6)

Comprehensive, professional-level architectural studio with visiting critics. Open to majors only. (6) Students engage in design issues facilitated through a series of thesis preparatory problems during the first half of the term. Preparatory problems are conducted when possible with visiting scholars and may involve travel to engage significant scholars and design problem settings. The second half of the term involves the presentation of the written thesis research document to a panel of nationally recognized critics and a final end of the semester presentation focusing on the student's thesis program and site design.

ARC 702. Thesis Design Studio. (6)

Students select a major field of interest and pursue in-depth study and research into special areas of concentration, such as architectural design, environmental controls, architectural structures, or urban and regional planning. Open to majors only.