Thematic Sequence

A Thematic Sequence is a series of related courses (usually three) that focuses on a theme or subject in a developmental way. Each course builds or expands upon knowledge or perspective gained from preceding courses, and some sequences prepare students for Capstone experiences. The first course may be a Foundation course and may count as hours in both Foundation and Thematic Sequence requirements. (Should the Thematic Sequence contain more than one Foundation course, only one of those courses can be counted for both requirements.) In interdepartmental Thematic Sequences, students must select those courses that are offered outside their department of major. For example, English majors who enroll in a Thematic Sequence comprised of English and history courses must sign up for the history courses.

Students who are completing the Global Miami Plan for Liberal Education must complete at least one Thematic Sequence outside the department of their major. Exceptions to this requirement include either students with majors in two different academic departments or students with minors outside their department of major. Students should consult divisional requirements for further restrictions on Thematic Sequences.

Students who wish to meet the Thematic Sequence requirement through a double major or a minor must complete the second major or minor outside their department of major. A student who uses a minor to complete the thematic sequence requirement must have 9 hours in the minor outside the department/program of his/her major, and at least 6 hours of these courses at the 200 level or above.

Typically, you are expected to complete most of your Foundation courses before beginning a Thematic Sequence. To enroll in a sequence, contact the department.

The Office of Liberal Education website (www.MiamiOH.edu/liberal-ed) provides a current listing of Thematic Sequences. Students may propose their own Thematic Sequences. See the Office of Liberal Education website for details.

Thematic Sequences (9 hours minimum)

  • ACC 1 A Language of Accounting
  • ACC 2 Financial Accounting and Reporting
  • AES 1 Air Power and National Security
    AMS 1 Global and Intercultural Perspectives
  • AMS 2 Popular Culture and Intercultural Analysis
  • ARB 1 Developing Language Skills in Arabic
  • ART 2 Ceramics Studio
  • ART 3 Metals Studio
  • ART 4 Sculpture Studio
  • ART 5 Three-Dimensional Art Studio
    ART 8 Art Education Methods
  • ATH 3 World Cultures
  • ATH 4 World Cultures, Policy, and Ecology
  • ATH 5 World Cultures and Social Relations
  • BIO 1 Conservation and the Environment
  • BIO 2 Molecular Processes: From Cells to Whole Plants
  • BIO 3 Plant Ecology
  • BIO 4 Plant Structure and Development
  • BIO 5 Concepts in Physiology
  • BIO 6 Animal Diversity
  • BLS 1 Law and Commerce
  • BUS 1 Miami's Professional Institute for Management Education (PRIME)
  • BWS 1 Africa: Culture/Power/History
  • CCA 1 Experiencing Arts and Culture
  • CCA 2 Principles in Innovation, Creativity, and Design Thinking
  • CHI 1 Developing Language Skills in Chinese
  • CHM 1 Chemistry of Environmental Measurements
  • CHM 2 Chemistry of Life Processes
  • CIT 1 Social and Global Computing
  • CJS 1 Race and Criminal Justice
  • CLS 1 Classical Civilization
  • CLS 2 Classical Literature
  • CLS 3 The Classical World: Words and Images
  • CLS 4 The Classical World: Identify and Experience
  • CMR 1 Perspective in Sales and Customer Service
  • CPB 1 Chemical Engineering Principles
  • CSE 2 Computer Systems
  • CSE 4 Website and Game Technology
    DST 1 Disability Studies
  • ECO 1 Economics of Labor Markets
  • ECO 2 Markets, Institutions, and the Role of Government
  • ECO 3 Business Cycles, Economic Welfare, and Macroeconomic Policy
  • ECO 4 Exchange, Growth, and Development in the Global Economy
  • ECO 5 Sustainable Systems
  • ECO 6 Microeconomic Perspectives
  • EDL 2 Critical Youth Studies
  • EDP 1 Cultural Patterns in Education and the Law Affecting Persons with Disability
  • EDP 2 Educational Technology and Instructional Design
  • EDP 3 Technology and Learning
  • EDP 4 Learning Research and Assessment
    EDT 1 Exploring STEM in Society
  • EDT 2 Teaching English as a Foreign Language Abroad (TEFLA)
  • ENG 2 Women and Literature
  • ENG 3 American Life and Culture Since World War II
    ENG 4 Film in Popular Culture
  • ENG 5 Language and Literacy
  • ENG 8 African American History and Literature
  • ENG 9 Writing for Specialized Audiences:  Print and Online Design and Composition
  • ENG 10 Italy and the Renaissance
  • ESP 1 Entrepreneurship in Different Contexts
  • FRE 1 French Cultural Studies (with FRE Capstone)
  • FRE 2 French Cultural Studies (without FRE Capstone)
  • FRE 3 European Cinema
  • FSW 1 Services and Supports for Children, Youth, and Families (temporarily unavailable on Oxford campus)
  • FSW 3 Families and Sexuality Across the Life Course
  • FSW 4 Children in Families
    FSW 6 Social Inequality and Social Welfare for Diverse Families and Groups
  • GEO 1 Urban Geography
  • GEO 2 Earth's Physical Environment: Geographic Patterns and Processes
  • GEO 3 Geographic Change
  • GEO 4 Global Forces in Regional Contexts
    GEO 5 Geospatial Techniques
  • GER 1 Culture, Literature, and Language of German Speaking Europe
  • GER 3 Developing Language Skills in German
  • GLG 1 Oceanography
  • GLG 2 The Water Planet
  • GLG 3 Plate Tectonics
  • GTY 2 Aging in Diverse Contexts
  • GTY 3 Health and Aging
  • GTY 4 Aging and Policy
  • HST 3 Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies
  • ISA 1 Quantitative Concepts for Managerial Decision Making
  • ISA 2 Applied Business Statistics
  • ISA 3 Web Mining and Knowledge Management
  • ISA 4 Applications Integration With Enterprise Systems
  • ITL 1 Italy in the Renaissance
  • JPN 1 Developing Language Skills in Japanese
  • JST 1 Jewish Studies
  • LAS 3 Latino Studies: Cultures and Histories of Latinos in the United States
  • LED 1 Urban Culture and Service-Learning
  • MBI 1 Biomedical Science
  • MBI 2 Molecular Genetics
  • MGT 1 Dynamics of Human Behavior in Organizations
  • MKT 5 Creating Customer Value Through Marketing
  • MTH 1 Axioms, Theorems, and Proof in Geometry and Algebra
  • MTH 2 Basic Mathematical Tools for Science
  • MTH 3 Almost Linear Structures: Models for Physical Science
  • MUS 1 The Performance of Music
  • MUS 3 African and African-Derived Music in the Western World
  • NSC 1 Naval Science: History of Warfare
  • NSC 2 Naval Science: War-An Extension of Politics
  • NSC 3 The Naval Sciences: An Integrated Study of Naval Engineering, Navigation, and Piloting
  • PHL 1 Ethics
  • PHL 4 Metaphysics and Epistemology
  • PHL 5 Reasoning
  • PHY 1 The Physical World: Contemporary Physics
  • PHY 2 Your Place in the Universe
  • PHY 3 Physics in Living Systems
  • POL 3 National Political Institutions
  • POL 6 Public Management and Leadership
  • PSY 1 Perspectives on Psychopathology
  • PSY 2 Patterns in Human Development
  • PSY 4 Developmental Patterns in Adulthood
  • PSY 5 Cognition: Understanding and Improving Thought
  • PSY 6 Applied Leadership and Pedagogy
  • REL 1 Religion and American Life
  • REL 2 Historical and Comparative Study of Religion
  • RUS 1 Russia and the Soviet Union
  • RUS 2 Russian Culture
  • RUS 3 Developing Language Skills in Russian
  • SBI 1 Miami's Professional Institute for Management Education (PRIME)
  • SDT 1 Self-Designed Thematic Sequence
  • SJS 1 Social Justice and Inequalities
  • SJS 2 Social Justice, Law and Crime
  • SOC 3 Sociological Perspectives on Inequality
  • SOC 4 Sociological Perspectives on Criminality and Deviance
  • SOC 5 Gender and Family Issues
  • SOC 6 Medical Sociology
  • SPA 2 Exploring Social, Emotional, and Communication Consequences in Special Populations
  • SPN 1 Literature and Culture in Spain
  • SPN 2 Literature and Culture in Spanish America
  • SPN 3 Spanish Language and Culture
  • STA 1 Quality Issues in Contemporary Business and Industry
  • STA 2 Applied Statistics
  • THE 1 Modern Theatre and Drama
  • THE 2 London Theatre
  • WGS 1 Gender in Global Context
  • WGS 2 Scholarly Studies of Gender and Sexuality

Thematic Sequences Available at Dolibois European Campus in Luxembourg

For information, contact the Oxford campus coordinator, 513-529-5050.

LUX 3 European Culture and Society (Offered during the semester programs and summer workshop)

Descriptions of Thematic Sequences

ACC 1 A Language of Accounting

Develops in non-business majors an ability to read and understand general-purpose external financial statements and internal managerial accounting reports for businesses and not-for-profit organizations. As such financial data are widely disseminated across all contexts in our society, a knowledge of the language of accounting is useful in a professional career and personal life. The focus is on using and interpreting, rather than preparing, financial statements and internal accounting reports.

ACC 221Introduction to Financial Accounting3
ACC 222Introduction to Managerial Accounting3
ACC 468/ACC 568Accounting for Governmental and Not-for-Profit Organizations3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to business majors.

ACC 2 Financial Accounting and Reporting

Develops in business majors as well as non-business majors an ability to read and understand general-purpose financial statements of businesses, ranging from large publicly traded corporations to small privately held companies. As such financial information is widely disseminated, an understanding of financial statements is useful in a professional career and personal life. The sequence progresses from an introductory level, which focuses on using and interpreting financial statements, through intermediate and advanced levels, which examine the impact of more complex transactions and events on financial statements.

ACC 221Introduction to Financial Accounting3
ACC 321Intermediate Financial Accounting3
ACC 422/ACC 522Financial Accounting Research3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to business majors.

AES 1 Air Power and National Security

Provides students opportunity to examine critically the definitions of national security and how national security policies affect-and are affected by-the context of international politics. The sequence examines, in particular, how the United States Air Force plays a major role in formulating national security policies.

POL 271World Politics3
AES 221
AES 222
The Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power
and The Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power
2
POL 376U.S. National Security Policy3
AES 431National Security Affairs and Preparation for Active Duty3
Total Credit Hours11

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Political Science.

AMS 1 Global and Intercultural Perspectives

Students in AMS 1 explore Global and Intercultural Perspectives in theoretical, practical, and experiential ways. This thematic sequence progresses from an introduction to globalization and American culture in AMS207, to an in depth exploration of immigration in AMS302, to an experiential class (AMS301) that requires students to apply critical self awareness and intercultural understanding to concrete projects related to civic engagement and social stewardship in a global context.

AMS 207America: Global and Intercultural Perspectives3
AMS 301American Identities3
AMS 302Immigrant America3
Total Credit Hours9

AMS 2 Popular Culture and Intercultural Analysis

Students in AMS 2 analysis popular culture from an intercultural perspective. In AMS206, students are introduced to AMS methods including close reading, putting texts in context, and interdisciplinary research. In AMS303 students focus on understanding American consumer culture from an interdisciplinary perspective. AMS305 analyzes American icons (historical and current) in a global context. This thematic sequence emphasizes critical thinking, writing, information literacy, and cultural analysis.

AMS 206Approaches to American Culture3
AMS 303Consumer Culture3
AMS 305American Icons3
Total Credit Hours9

ARB 1 Developing Language Skills in Arabic

For students who have completed the first two semesters of college-level Arabic language or the equivalent. This sequence develops speaking, listening, reading, and writing ability using a variety of materials drawn from textbooks, fiction, the Internet and journalism as well as multimedia. The courses are characterized by small sections and in-class and out-of-class interaction. Courses may not be taken credit/no-credit and must be taken in order.

ARB 201Intermediate Modern Arabic3
ARB 202Intermediate Modern Arabic3
ARB 301Advanced Arabic3
Total Credit Hours9

ART 2 Ceramics Studio

Explores and develops concepts, techniques, materials, methods, and critical aesthetic thinking as applied to the process of making utilitarian or sculptural ceramics. Ceramics as a nonverbal visual language is taught through research, production, viewing, interaction, and verbal critique with a focus on further development toward a significant personal expression at the 300 level. 

ART 261Ceramics I3
ART 361Ceramics II3
ART 362Ceramics III3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Art.

ART 3 Metals Studio

Explores and develops concepts, critical aesthetic thinking, methods, techniques, and materials as applied to the process of designing and making of jewelry, holloware, as well as functional and nonfunctional objects in non-precious and precious metals. Metals as a visual language is taught through research, interaction, production, and verbal critique with a focus on further development toward a more significant personal expression at the 300 level.

ART 264Jewelry Design and Metals I3
ART 364Jewelry Design and Metals II3
ART 365Jewelry Design and Metals III3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Art.

ART 4 Sculpture Studio

Explores concepts and develops critical aesthetic thinking, methods, techniques, and materials as applied to the process of making sculpture. Sculpture, as a visual language, is taught through viewing, research, interaction, production, and verbal critique with focus on further development toward significant personal expression at the 300 level.

ART 271Sculpture I3
ART 371Sculpture II3
ART 372Sculpture III3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Art.

ART 5 Three-Dimensional Art Studio

Explores and develops concepts, techniques, materials, methods, and critical aesthetic thinking as applied to the process of making three-dimensional objects. Three-dimensional art as a nonverbal language is taught through research, production, viewing, interaction, and verbal critique with a focus on further development toward a significant personal expression. Begins with the departmental core course then provides a broad experience of working in three disciplines: metals, ceramics, and sculpture.

Courses may be taken in any order:

ART 261Ceramics I3
ART 264Jewelry Design and Metals I3
ART 271Sculpture I3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Art.

ART 8 Art Education Methods

This sequence allows students to explore how visual art can and should be infused into other disciplinary areas and how other disciplines add to the depth and content of visual art. Focus is given to various settings for art education, including PK-12, community-based and art museums. Students will progressively grow in their knowledge and appreciation for how PK-12 students learn art from a young age and how pedagogical and environmental methodologies and issues affect learning. The sequence assumes no prior knowledge of art education and welcomes anyone interested in learning more about the visual arts in a PK-12 grade educative, community-based or art museum setting.

ART 195Introduction to Art Education3
Select two of the following:6
Elementary Art Methods
Secondary Art Methods
Art Across the Curriculum
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Art.

ATH 3 World Cultures

Provides an appreciation of human cultural diversity and how anthropologists interpret that diversity in marriage and family patterns, political and economic organizations, and symbol systems. Acquaints you with various perspectives anthropologists use to understand human cultural variability. The final course allows you to pursue cultural diversity in one of the world's major culture areas or in the relations between culture and one specific aspect of life for all people, such as personality, environment, or cognition.

Select one of the following:3
Lost Cities & Ancient Civilizations
Peoples of the World
Cultural Diversity in the U.S.
Select the following:
ATH 231Foundations of Cultural Anthropology4
Select one of the following:3-4
Africa: Anthropological Perspectives
Native North America: Anthropological Perspectives
Latin America: Anthropological Perspectives
Russia and Eurasia: Anthropological Perspectives
The Middle East: Anthropological Perspectives
South Asia: Anthropological Perspectives
Identity, Race, Gender, Class
Social Anthropology
Multiculturalism in Europe: Anthropological Perspectives
Introduction to Medical Anthropology
Travelers, Migrants, and Refugees: Transnational Migration and Diasporic Communities
Language and Power
African Oral Traditions
Key Questions in Psychological Anthropology
Doctors, Clinics, and Epidemics
Anthropology of Capitalism: Russia
Culture, Art, and Artifacts
Food, Taste, and Desire
Anthropology of Women's Health
Ecological Anthropology
Total Credit Hours10-11

Note: Not open to majors in the Anthropology Department.

ATH 4 World Cultures, Policy, and Ecology

Provides an appreciation of human cultural diversity and envelops anthropological approaches to understanding diversity in political, economic and environmental organization and practice.

Select one of the following:3
Lost Cities & Ancient Civilizations
Introduction to Anthropology
Peoples of the World
Cultural Diversity in the U.S.
Select one of the following courses on a World Area:3-4
Africa: Anthropological Perspectives
Native North America: Anthropological Perspectives
Latin America: Anthropological Perspectives
Russia and Eurasia: Anthropological Perspectives
The Middle East: Anthropological Perspectives
South Asia: Anthropological Perspectives
Religions of Africa
Language and Culture in Native North America
African Oral Traditions
Select one of the following courses on anthropological topics in world cultures:3
Sustainability: European Challenges and Strategies
Applied Anthropology
Archaeology of Power
Ecological Anthropology
Total Credit Hours9-10

Note: Not open to majors in the Anthropology Department.

ATH 5 World Cultures and Social Relations

Provides an appreciation of human cultural diversity and develops anthropological approaches to understanding diversity in social and economic organization, marriage and family patterns, and other facets and forums for social relations.

Select one of the following:3
Lost Cities & Ancient Civilizations
Peoples of the World
Cultural Diversity in the U.S.
Select one of the following courses on a World Area:3-4
Africa: Anthropological Perspectives
Native North America: Anthropological Perspectives
Latin America: Anthropological Perspectives
Russia and Eurasia: Anthropological Perspectives
The Middle East: Anthropological Perspectives
South Asia: Anthropological Perspectives
Religions of Africa
Multiculturalism in Europe: Anthropological Perspectives
Language and Culture in Native North America
African Oral Traditions
Select one of the following courses on anthropological topics in world cultures:3
Intercultural Relations
Identity, Race, Gender, Class
Social Anthropology
Introduction to Medical Anthropology
Travelers, Migrants, and Refugees: Transnational Migration and Diasporic Communities
Language and Power
Key Questions in Psychological Anthropology
Anthropology of Capitalism: Russia
Culture, Art, and Artifacts
Anthropology of Religion
Food, Taste, and Desire
Anthropology of Women's Health
Total Credit Hours9-10

Note: Not open to majors in the Anthropology Department.

BIO 1 Conservation and the Environment

Focuses on the challenge of reconciling increasing demands on resources with limitations on resource availability, and explores conservation as it pertains to the environment from a biological and social science perspective, including a historical overview. The first course, chosen from three options, is also a Foundation course in the biological science area. The second course integrates ecological, socioeconomic, and policy perspectives on the use and management of natural resources. The third course focuses on applied problem solving.

Select one of the following:3
Plants, Humanity, and Environment
Environmental Biology
Ecology of North America
Select the following:
GEO 271Human Dimensions of Natural Resource Conservation3
IES 431/IES 531Principles and Applications of Environmental Science3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Departments of Geography or Biology.

BIO 2 Molecular Processes: From Cells to Whole Plants

A contemporary consideration of how plants work mechanistically. Combines molecular and subcellular structure and function with physical and chemical measurements of underlying genetic and physiological controls. Deals with establishment, replication, maintenance, coordination, and adaptive responses of plants at organizational levels ranging from molecules to whole plants.

BIO/MBI 116Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular, and Molecular Biology4
or BIO 191 Plant Biology
BIO 203Introduction to Cell Biology3
BIO 342Genetics3-4
or BIO 425/BIO 525 Environmental Plant Physiology
Total Credit Hours10-11

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Biology.

BIO 3 Plant Ecology

Provides an understanding of how plants interact with the environment, other plants, and other organisms. Included is study of the evolution of plant traits that are important in these interactions and factors that influence plant distributions at global and local scales. Several levels of organization are covered, including individuals, populations, communities, ecosystems, and landscapes.

BIO/MBI 115Biological Concepts: Ecology, Evolution, Genetics, and Diversity4
or BIO 191 Plant Biology
BIO 204Evolution of Plant Biodiversity: Genes to Biosphere4
Select one of the following:3
Plant Ecology
Global Plant Diversity
Ecoregions of North America
Total Credit Hours11

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Biology. Majors in the Department of Microbiology must select a course outside the department of major at the first level.

BIO 4 Plant Structure and Development

In order to appreciate the unique role that plants play in the world's ecosystems, it is important to understand plant structure and development. This sequence allows students to consider plants from the molecular and cellular level to the tissue and organ level. It illustrates how evolutionary forces have resulted in exquisite adaptations in plant form and function.

BIO/MBI 116Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular, and Molecular Biology4
or BIO 191 Plant Biology
BIO 203Introduction to Cell Biology3
BIO 314Plant and Fungal Diversity4
or BIO 402/BIO 502 Plant Anatomy
Total Credit Hours11

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Biology. Majors in the Department of Microbiology must select a course outside the department of major at the first level.

BIO 5 Concepts in Physiology

Provides an understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in physiological systems. Begins with a Foundation course then provides more depth to cellular and molecular mechanisms of action in physiological processes.

BIO/MBI 116Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular, and Molecular Biology4
BIO 203Introduction to Cell Biology3
BIO 305Human Physiology4
Total Credit Hours11

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Biology.

BIO 6 Animal Diversity

Illustrates the diversity of organisms within the Kingdom Animalia. This diversity includes variation in body structure and function, life history traits, and ecological roles. Upon completion, students will be able to describe major patterns in variation among animal taxa, understand mechanisms that lead to creation of such variation, and provide detailed examples of animal diversity.

BIO/MBI 115Biological Concepts: Ecology, Evolution, Genetics, and Diversity4
BIO 209Fundamentals of Ecology3
or BIO 206 Evolutionary Biology
BIO 311Vertebrate Zoology4
or BIO 312 Invertebrate Zoology
Total Credit Hours11

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Biology.

BLS 1 Law and Commerce

Examines legal theory, history, and institutions as they relate to American culture, society and business. Focuses on why and how "American law" developed, how and why it is applied, how and why the law is evolving, and how and why it impacts commerce. Applies legal principles to analyze, identify and solve legal problems arising in common business activity. Emphasizes in-depth study of legal rules, rationale, and application in substantive areas of law and commerce. Acquaints potential law students with legal thinking and application in substantive areas of law and commerce. Acquaints potential law students with legal thinking and concepts.

BLS 342Legal Environment of Business3
BLS 442Business Associations & Communal Law3
Select one of the following:3
Government and Business
Cyberlaw
Property Law
Estates, Wills & Trusts
International Business Law
Employment Law
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in business.

BUS 1 Miami's Professional Institute for Management Education (PRIME)

Students will acquire a basic understanding of how businesses and people work together, providing synergy with the student's chosen major. Four-week program is designed to help talented non-business students develop a clear advantage in the competitive job market. The sequence assumes that you have no prior knowledge of business topics and is intended to make business learning interesting, accessible, and valuable to students in all majors.

Prerequisite: Students must have 60 hours of college credit and permission of the instructor.

BUS 301Macro Concepts in Contemporary Business3
BUS 302Micro Concepts in Contemporary Business3
BUS 303Business Process Integration3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to students with majors or minors in business.

BWS 1 Africa: Culture/Power/History

Provides a multidisciplinary, global introduction to Africa that emphases cultural and economic production, social life, political diversity, and rich history. Students will critically reevaluate dominant representations but focus on how various Africans experience and represent culture, power, and history. Students will deepen their understanding of local, regional, and global processes that have shaped the world’s second largest continent, past and present. Will help students hone intercultural skills for active, ethical, and productive participation in a global economy.

Required course
BWS 156Introduction to Africa4
Select two of the following: (at least one must be at the 300-level)6
African Oral Traditions
Africa: Anthropological Perspectives
Religions of Africa
Africa to 1884
National Cinemas: African Film
Contemporary African Politics
Total Credit Hours10

Note: Not open to Black World Studies majors.

CCA 1 Experiencing Arts and Culture

Students will travel domestically or abroad to a particular urban location(s) (e.g. New York, Paris, Milan, Prague, etc.) for an immersive thematic sequence focused on the global importance and impact of the integrated creative arts (e.g.: architecture, interior design, theatre, studio arts, graphic design, music, etc.). This intensive, experiential program will help a student from any major develop a general knowledge of cultural history, and an understanding of the theories and application of various forms of the creative arts. This sequence assumes no prior knowledge and is intended to make the creative arts interesting, accessible, and valuable for all majors. There are no prerequisites, but students need to have completed 30 hours, or have permission of the instructor. This will ensure that the sequence builds on the foundational liberal education knowledge gained in the first year. Instruction will be provided by a multi-disciplinary team of faculty from the College of Creative Arts.

CCA 121Introduction to the Integrated Arts and Culture3
CCA 221Immersion in the Integrated Arts and Culture3
ART 256Design, Perception & Audience3
Total Credit Hours9

CCA 2 Principles in Innovation, Creativity, and Design Thinking

Sponsored by the Miami Design Collaborative, a multi-disciplinary network that brings together faculty and students from throughout Miami to study and practice principles in innovation and design process, this sequence: provides multi-disciplinary learning opportunities where students can experience different problem-solving orientations inherent in various disciplinary perspectives; offers learning opportunities focused on contemporary issues; fuses design thinking processes inherent in art, psychology, entrepreneurship, and interactive media; and balances theory and practice, allowing students to implement their ideas through project-based learning.

CCA 111Innovation, Creativity and Design Thinking 13
Select one of the following:3
Design, Perception & Audience 1
Building Interactive Objects
Survey of Perception, Action, and Cognition
Select one of the following:3-4
Social Entrepreneurship
Corporate Entrepreneurship
Human Factors/Ergonomics
Total Credit Hours9-10
1

Only one Foundation (MPF) course can count toward both a Foundation requirement and a Thematic Sequence.

CHI 1 Developing Language Skills in Chinese

For students who have completed the first two semesters of college-level Chinese language or the equivalent. This sequence develops speaking, listening, reading and writing ability using a variety of materials drawn from textbooks as well as multimedia. The courses are characterized by small sections and in-class and out-of-class interaction. Courses may not be taken credit/no credit and must be taken in order.

CHI 201Second Year Chinese3
CHI 202Second Year Chinese3
CHI 301Third Year Chinese3
Total Credit Hours9

CHM 1 Chemistry of Environmental Measurements

Enhances theoretical knowledge toward understanding environmental chemical issues and provides a foundation for learning followed by systematic investigation of advanced concepts in chemistry. Allows accomplished students to take alternative courses.

Select one of the following:5-6
College Chemistry
and College Chemistry Laboratory
College Chemistry for Majors
and College Chemistry Laboratory
Select one of the following:4-6
Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry
Organic Chemistry
and Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Organic Chemistry for Chemistry Majors
and Organic Chemistry Laboratory for Chemistry Majors
Select the following:
CHM 363
CHM 364
Analytical Chemistry
and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory
5
Total Credit Hours14-17

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry.

CHM 2 Chemistry of Life Processes

Enhances theoretical knowledge toward understanding biochemistry and provides a foundation for learning followed by the systematic investigation of advanced concepts in chemistry. Allows accomplished students to take alternative courses.

Prerequisite: CHM 141, CHM 144 (Foundation courses); alternative courses require additional prerequisites.

Select one of the following:5-6
College Chemistry
and College Chemistry Laboratory
College Chemistry for Majors
and College Chemistry Laboratory
Quantitative Analysis
Select one of the following:4-6
Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry
Organic Chemistry
and Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Organic Chemistry for Chemistry Majors
and Organic Chemistry Laboratory for Chemistry Majors
Select one of the following:3-4
Outlines of Biochemistry
Fundamentals of Biochemistry
Total Credit Hours12-16

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry.

CIT 1 Social and Global Computing

Technology has a pervasive effect on society. How we live, work, and interact has been and will continue to be deeply affected by the use of computers and other technologies. Some researchers even believe that the use of technology is actually changing how our brains work. Understanding the effects of technology on society and the implications of using technology in terms of ethics, communication, and personal interaction is critical. Those who have a greater awareness of these issues will be better positioned for success in all aspects of business and personal endeavors.

CIT 167Information Technology People and Practices2
CIT/CSE 262Technology, Ethics, and Global Society3
CIT 448Global and Strategic Issues in Information Technology3
Total Credit Hours8

CJS 1 Race and Criminal Justice

This thematic sequence, which will be open to all students, introduces students to the role race plays in law and the administration of criminal justice.  The sequence will offer a sociohistorical framework of the criminal justice system and the inequalities that are inherently part of its structure with a special emphasis on race in policing, the law of criminal and juvenile adjudications, and corrections.

Required course
BWS 151Introduction to Black World Studies4
Select two of the following:
CJS 211Law Enforcement3
BWS/CJS 401Race and Criminal Justice3
Total Credit Hours10

Note: Not open to Criminal Justice majors.

CLS 1 Classical Civilization

Combines a general introduction to classical civilization and an in-depth encounter with Greco-Roman civilization, focusing on elements that provide opportunities for observing differences between modern and ancient civilization. Uses literature, monuments, legal documents, art, and sculpture to examine key examples of social organization, including the status of women, legal structures, and urban organization.

Select one of the following:3
Greek Civilization in its Mediterranean Context
Roman Civilization
Introduction to Classical Mythology
Select one of the following:3
Greek and Roman Architecture
Race and Ethnicity in Antiquity
Women in Antiquity
Select one of the following:3
Greek and Roman Sculpture
Greek and Roman Painting
Justice and the Law in Antiquity
Women's Religious Experiences in the Ancient Mediterranean World
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Classics. Majors in the Departments of Art and Comparative Religion must select a minimum of nine hours outside department of major.

CLS 2 Classical Literature

Provides an overview of Greek or Roman literature, then examines in detail the historical evolution of specific genres, such as tragedy, drama, and epic. Attention to historical forces that brought these genres into existence and those forces that affected their growth and development.

Select one of the following:3
Greek Civilization in its Mediterranean Context
Roman Civilization
Introduction to Classical Mythology
Select one of the following:3
Topics in Classics
Greek and Roman Epic
Greek and Roman Tragedy
Greek and Roman Comedy
Greek and Roman Historians
Select one of the following:3
Greek and Roman Erotic Poetry
Greek and Roman Philosophical Writers
From Epic to Romance
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Classics.

CLS 3 The Classical World: Words and Images

Classical antiquity was uniquely creative in producing literary and visual forms (epic, lyric, tragedy, comedy, history, rhetoric, philosophic dialogue and the philosophic treatise) by which it communicated socially rooted visions and ideals.  This sequence fosters students’ grasp of the role form plays in shaping what any culture expresses at the same time it focuses on the historically determined values and visions that were thus expressed. Students will examine ways in which basic forms interact and evolve into new forms (e.g. epic to novel, public speaking in epic and history to full-fledged rhetoric) and the subsequent reception of these forms in other ancient and modern cultures. They will also concentrate on particular conflicts over the ways in which different forms compete for ideological supremacy.

Select one of the following:3
Greek Civilization in its Mediterranean Context
Roman Civilization
Introduction to Classical Mythology
Select one of the following:3
Greek and Roman Epic
Greek and Roman Tragedy
Greek and Roman Comedy
Greek and Roman Historians
Greek and Roman Cities
Greek and Roman Architecture
Greek and Roman Sculpture
Greek and Roman Painting
Select one of the following:3-4
Discoveries of Archaeology
From Epic to Romance
The Greeks in the Near East and Central Asia
Egypt in Greco-Roman History and Fiction
Playwriting
Total Credit Hours9-10

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Classics. Majors in the Departments of Art and English must select a minimum of nine hours outside department of major.

CLS 4 The Classical World: Identity and Experience

Specific to Classical antiquity was a set of deeply influential institutions, practices, and ideological elaborations that both drew from and interacted with a wide range of other Mediterranean cultures in shaping the day-to-day identities and life experiences of Greeks and Romans as well as the cultures on which they impacted. In this sequence, students explore some of the most basic issues (e.g. gender, religion, public entertainments, race and ethnicity, imperial conquest and domination) associated with these influences and their more specialized consequences in specific geographical, cultural and institutional areas (e.g. Egypt, Jews in Antiquity, The Construction of Age Identities).

Select one of the following:3
Greek Civilization in its Mediterranean Context
Roman Civilization
Introduction to Classical Mythology
Select one of the following:3
Race and Ethnicity in Antiquity
Women in Antiquity
Ancient Sexualities
Select one of the following:3
Classical Mythology and the Arts
The Greeks in the Near East and Central Asia
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Classics.

CMR 1 Perspective in Sales and Customer Service

Regardless of one’s educational or career aspirations, an understanding of how companies, institutions, and governments attract and satisfy their customers is a valuable skill. Organizations reward those employees, whatever their position, who are able to understand and assist in the ongoing process of adding and keeping customers. Students will be encouraged and challenged to expand their understanding beyond the skills of constructing a marketing plan or ad campaign to explore marketing in ways that will extend their sense of moral commitment, ethical understanding and civic action. This Thematic Sequence lays a strong foundation of broad marketing principles with an in-depth look at both the promotional tools to attract new customers and strategies and tactics to service them.

CMR 105Introduction to Marketing3
CMR 261Customer Service & Satisfaction3
CMR 263Sales and Promotions3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to students with majors or minors in business.

CPB 1 Chemical Engineering Principles

Provides an understanding of basic chemical engineering principles, concepts, and methodologies and how they are applied to the design and performance analysis of industrial processes.

Prerequisite: (CPB 204) grade of C- or better in CHM 141, CHM 142; MTH 151, MTH 251; or competence in spreadsheets. (CPB 313/MME 313) grade of C- or better in PHY 192, and CPB 204. (CPB 403/CPB 503/MME 403/MME 503) grade of C- or better in MME 313/CPB 313, MTH 245, and MME 314/CPB 314.

CPB 204Material and Energy Balances3
CPB/MME 313Fluid Mechanics3
CPB/MME 403Heat Transfer3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Chemical, Paper and Biomedical Engineering.

CSE 2 Computer Programming

Because computer information systems usually are not developed by single individuals, it is likely that you will participate on a development team during your professional life. With this sequence, you are in a unique position to understand, assist, and contribute to the development of information systems that improve your own and your colleagues' way of work.

CSE 174Fundamentals of Programming and Problem Solving3
CSE 271Object-Oriented Programming3
Select one of the following:3
Web Application Programming
Data Abstraction and Data Structures
Data Communication and Networks
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering.

CSE 4 Website and Game Technology

Given the prevalence on computing devices, it is important that we understand what they do and how they do it. The web site and computer game technology thematic sequence is designed to provide students with an intuitive understanding of how computer software is created and designed and how it functions to make possible common applications such as computer games and the World Wide Web. After learning the concepts and skills of computer programming, students will apply this knowledge to design and create a variety of computer games and web applications.

Select any of the following introductory courses:3
Introduction to C/C++ Programming
Introduction to Computer Concepts and Programming
Fundamentals of Programming and Problem Solving
Select the following:
CSE 251Introduction to Game Programming3
CSE 252Web Application Programming3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering.

DST 1 Disability Studies

This interdisciplinary thematic sequence offers a broad liberal arts approach to the study of disability, providing students with knowledge of the historical, social, artistic,literary, legal, educational, philosophical, and political framing of disability. Students develop am interdisciplinary foundation, with emphasis on cultural constructions of disability and the intersections of disability, race, gender, sex, age, class, and other markers of diversity and difference.

DST 272Introduction to Disability Studies3
Select one of the following:3
Women and (Dis)ability: Fictions and Contaminations of Identity
(Dis)Ability Allies: To be or not to be? Developing Identity and Pride from Practice
Disability History in America
Disability History in America
Media Illusions: Creations of "The Disabled" Identity
Select the following:
DST/ENG 494/EDP 489Disability in Global and Local Contexts3
Total Credit Hours9

ECO 1 Economics of Labor Markets

Provides an understanding of how labor markets work, the impact and/or need for employment related public policies, and why employment outcomes (wages, benefits, hours worked, retirement ages) differ across time and people. Primarily provides understanding from an economic perspective.

ECO 201Principles of Microeconomics3
ECO 361Labor Economics3
ECO 462Economics of Compensation3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in business.

ECO 2 Markets, Institutions, and the Role of Government

In some situations, competitive markets fail to allocate resources efficiently. In some instances, production is concentrated in the hands of a few firms that may restrain output and raise prices. In other cases, market prices fail to fully reflect the costs or benefits associated with the consumption or production of certain goods. This arises in the case of externalities or government in ensuring allocative efficiency.

ECO 201Principles of Microeconomics3
Select two of the following:6
American Industries and Issues
Government and Business
Public Sector Economics
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in business.

ECO 3 Business Cycles, Economic Welfare, and Macroeconomic Policy

Concern for the material well-being of individuals motivates the study of aggregates since fluctuations in these aggregates and changes in their growth rates significantly affect welfare. Focuses on possible government initiatives to influence the behavior of economic aggregates and enhance welfare. Addresses rationale for government intervention, practical difficulties associated with actual implementation of policy, and evaluation of policy. Macroeconomic history and current policy discussions provide many applications. Provides understanding of motives, pitfalls, and history of macroeconomic policy.

ECO 202Principles of Macroeconomics3
ECO 317Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory3
ECO 418/ECO 518Monetary Theory and Policy3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in business.

ECO 4 Exchange, Growth, and Development in the Global Economy

Evolution of the modern world economy has been influenced not only by technical and institutional changes within national economics but also by interactions among them. Substantial international flows of people, goods, capital, and technology, since the beginning of the modern era, have helped to set the terms for development of national patterns of economic growth and specialization. Introduces formal analysis of international economic relations in the areas of trade, financial flows, and government policies, and then encourages examination of international economic developments in various historical and institutional settings.

ECO 344International Economic Relations3
Select two of the following:6
Comparative Economic Systems
Economic Development
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in business.

ECO 5 Sustainable Systems

Sustainability requires that business and resource use be conducted in ways that meet the needs of the enterprise and its stakeholders today, while protecting, sustaining, and enhancing human resources and the environment for the future. Provides scientific, philosophic, and economic principles necessary to appreciate a sustainable system. Sequence of four courses.

Select one of the following:3-4
Plants, Humanity, and Environment
Environmental Biology
Environmental Geology
Select the following:
GEO 271Human Dimensions of Natural Resource Conservation3
PHL 376Environmental Philosophy4
ECO 406/ECO 506Environmental Economics3
Total Credit Hours13-14

Note: Not open to majors in the departments of Geography or Philosophy, or in the School of Business. Majors in the Departments of Biology and Geology must select a course outside the department of major at the first level.

ECO 6 Microeconomic Perspectives

Introduces theory and practice of microeconomics and develops, both intuitively and formally, the prevailing paradigm for describing decision-making processes of microeconomics agents. Students see how the “microeconomic way of thinking” can be applied to a wide variety of topical political and social issues and discover how it provides a coherent and consistent structure for understanding, analyzing, and dealing with “real world” problems.

ECO 201Principles of Microeconomics3
ECO 202Principles of Macroeconomics3
ECO 315Intermediate Microeconomic Theory3
Select one of the following:3
American Industries and Issues
Economic Analysis of Law
Public Sector Economics
Health Economics
Poverty and Income Distribution
Labor Economics
Government and Business
Economics of Compensation
Total Credit Hours12

Note: Not open to majors in business.

EDL 2 Critical Youth Studies

Critical Youth Studies is the study of how young people actively create subcultures that affirm diverse identities, resist social exclusion, negotiate their roles within educational institutions, and work for social change. The focus in youth studies is on adolescents and young adults, rather than children, and on the important role of youth subcultures in promoting social change consistent with values of social justice, equity, and inclusion. Youth studies seeks to help students better understand how young people can become more active agents in the development of their own identities and contribute to democratic organizations. This involves an analysis of the everyday, lived experiences of youth—in and out of educational institutions—and the representation of youth in popular culture (including film, art, literature, and music). Finally, critical youth studies is interdisciplinary in nature drawing insights from sociology, history, and philosophy of education as well as race, ethnic and gender studies.

Select the following:
EDL/BWS 203Introduction to Critical Youth Studies3
Select two or more of the following:6
Introduction to Disability Studies
Sociocultural Studies in Education
Media Representations of Youth and Urban Education
Transnational Youth Cultures
Sexuality, Youth, Education
Community-Based Research & Learning in Education
Senior Capstone in History
Social Justice and Change
Latin American Popular Culture
Social Justice and Change
Social/Political Activism
Feminism and the Diaspora: U.S. Women of Color
Black Feminist Theory
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Open to all majors. Students must select a minimum of nine hours outside their department of major.

EDP 1 Cultural Patterns in Education and the Law Affecting Persons with Disability

Enhances critical understanding of issues surrounding individuals who fall outside the "norm."  Issues include societal values and moral practices related to development, identification, socialization, education, and treatment of these individuals. Explores exceptionality among individuals from the perspectives of psychological "disorder," developmental or educational "difference," and/or "deviance" from socially defined norms. Explores difference as a normally occurring phenomenon of the human condition.

Prerequisite: EDP 101 or PSY 111 or EDP 201

EDP 256Psychology of the Exceptional Learner3
Select two of the following:6
Introduction to Disability Studies
Effective Social Skills Development, Collaboration and Transition Planning in Special Education
Methods II: Learners with Mild to Moderate Disabilities
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Educational Psychology.

EDP 2 Educational Technology and Instructional Design

Designed for students interested in the design, creation, and integration of technology/media for teaching and learning in both K12 and non-K12 environments (e.g. business, higher education, government, military, health care, religious organizations, etc.). Students will learn the processes of designing, developing, and evaluating the effectiveness of educational/instructional media for classroom and eLearning environments.

Select the following:
EDP 279Technology + Media Literacy and Learning3
Select two of the following:6
Instructional Design Theory and Models
Evaluation and Assessment for Instructional Design
Diversity, Learning & Technology
Curriculum & Technology
Educational Interactive Design
Serious and Educational Game Design and Simulations
Total Credit Hours9

EDP 3 Technology and Learning

This thematic sequence enhances students’ understanding of the relationship among current and emerging technologies and learning.  Students will gain experience and skills in creating and using technology systems in unique learning contexts while developing a critical awareness of the affordances and constraints of various technologies for teaching and learning. Throughout the courses is a common theme of exploring the relationship between Technology and Learning. The courses in the sequence include introductory experiences in crafting media for educational purposes as well as experience in applying principles of technology integration in formal and informal learning environments.

EDP 279Technology + Media Literacy and Learning3
or EDP 331 Introduction to Educational Technology
Select two of the following:6
Games and Learning
Audiovisual Instruction: Methods, Media, and Technology
Educational Interactive Design
eLearning in K-12 Education
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Majors in the Department of Interactive Media Studies must select a minimum of nine hours outside department of major.

EDP 4 Learning Research and Assessment

The EDP4 thematic sequence "Learning Research and Assessment" is a 9 credit thematic sequence which emphasizes core topics of Educational Psychology. The topics have been selected to enhance the learning of students in and outside the College of Education, Health, and Society. Students complete one learning course, one assessment course, and one research course.

EDP 101Psychology Of The Learner3
or EDP 201 Human Development and Learning in Social and Educational Contexts
EDP 301Assessment and Evaluation in Educational Settings3
or EDP 432/EDP 532 Assessment and Educational Planning for Children Age 3 to 8
or EDP 494/EDP 594 Assessment, Evaluation, and Educational Planning for Learners with Exceptionalities
EDP 324Research and Applied Writing Across the Disciplines3
Total Credit Hours9

NOTE: Not open to majors in the Department of Educational Psychology.

EDT 1 Exploring STEM in Society

The courses offered as part of the Exploring STEM in Society thematic sequence take an integrated approach to the teaching and learning of STEM disciplines. Currently, students who want to become a science or mathematics teacher enroll in content and education courses that treat STEM disciplines as disparate subject areas (e.g. Biology, Physics, Earth Science, Mathematics, etc). However, current reform movements in science and mathematics education (NGSS) NGSS Lead States, 2103)) point out the inter-connect address of STEM disciplines and emphasize the importance of preparing future science and mathematic teachers who understand and effectively implement an integrated approach to the teaching and learning of STEM disciplines.

EDT 188Creativity and Innovation in STEM Education3
EDT 288Ways of Thinking in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) Education3
EDT 488Grand Challenges in STEM Education3
Total Credit Hours9

EDT 2 Teaching English as a Foreign Language Abroad (TEFLA)

Designed for those interested in teaching English as a Foreign Language (EFL*) abroad, this thematic sequence is grounded in theory and best practices of second language learning. The sequence examines respect for diversity, multilingualism, multiculturalism, and individuals’ language rights, while recognizing the value of learning English in today’s globalized world. The courses also prepare students with the ability to design curriculum, write lessons, and assess teaching English as Foreign language. The sequence progresses from introductory level content to theoretical and practical tools that will enable students to become critical and reflective language practitioners.

* EFL differs from ESL (English as a second language). EFL involves teaching English in countries where English is a foreign language (such as Costa Rica or China). ESL involves teaching English in countries where English is the main language (such as the US or Australia).

EDT 221Teaching English Language Learners in PK-12: Culture & Second Language Acquisition3
EDT 444/EDT 544Language Teaching and Learning I3
Select one of the followign:3
Language Teaching and Learning II
Reading in the Foreign Language

Note: Not open to Foreign Language majors.

ENG 2 Women and Literature

Assumes the importance of gender as a category for analyzing authors and texts. Attention to how various literatures that constitute “English literature” represent women and gender constructions, how these representations differ, and the various agendas pursued through these representations. Most important, emphasizes women as themselves authors and readers. Builds new knowledge of non-canonical writers and texts; reconsiders canonical writers and texts by focusing on depictions of women or your relation to women's writings.

Required course:
ENG/WGS 232Women Writers3
Select two of the following:6
Readings in Literatures and Cultures 1
Studies in American Regionalism
Cultural Politics of Gender and Sexuality in Asian/America
Interdisciplinary Special Topics 1
Women and Gender in Film
Special Topics in English Studies 1
Readings in Multicultural Perspectives 1
Feminism and the Diaspora: U.S. Women of Color
Black Feminist Theory
Studies in Literary Theory 1
Special Topics in Literary Study 1
Introduction to Women's Studies
Total Credit Hours9
1

Topics may vary from semester to semester. Consult the sequence coordinator to see if the topic can be applied.

Note: Open to all majors. Majors in the Departments of English, English Studies, Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, and American Studies must select a minimum of nine hours outside department of major.

ENG 3 American Life and Culture Since World War II

A cross-disciplinary study of the changing forms of American culture since World War II.

Select the following:
ENG 276American Literature 1900 to the Present3
Select two of the following:6
Postwar to Postmodern, 1945-1980
Race and Ethnic Relations
Special Topics in Language Awareness 1
Native American Literature
Asian American Literature
Latino/a Literature and the Americas
Contemporary American Fiction
Ethnic American Literatures
Cultural Politics of Gender and Sexuality in Asian/America
Contemporary American Literature
African American Writing, 1946-Present
Studies in American Regionalism 1
Major English and American Writers 1
The United States in the 1960s
United States in the Modern Era
Total Credit Hours9
1

Topics may vary from semester to semester. Consult the sequence coordinator to see if the topic can be applied.

Note: Nine hours minimum must be taken outside department of major.

ENG 4 Film in Popular Culture

Introduces cultural studies, specifically the analysis of contemporary popular culture. One of the central objectives is to develop analytical tools to examine how film, popular literature, and other mass media (ordinarily 'taken for granted" elements of everyday life) have shaped our modern sensibility. In its very nature, the study of popular culture is interdisciplinary, examining both the text and the context of such cultural creations as mass-market literature and film.

FST 201Film History and Analysis3
ENG/FST 220Literature and Film3
Select one of the following:3
Shakespeare and Film
Classical Hollywood Cinema
Alternative Traditions in Film
Women in Film
Total Credit Hours9

ENG 5 Language and Literacy

Uses formal reasoning skills, research and writing, and ethnographic case studies to develop a sense of the synchronic structure and diachronic background of the English language so that you understand how concepts of literacy have changed through the ages, how literacy functions in contemporary society, and how societies, schools, and communication technologies interact to shape our concepts of literacy, rhetoric, and language standards. Studies grammatical structure of modern English, social and cultural history of the language, and either rhetorical theory (STC 239) or contemporary notions of teaching writing (ENG 304). Although ENG 301 and ENG 302 are recommended to be taken before ENG 304 or STC 239, choose three of the four courses listed.

Complete three of the following courses:9
History of the English Language
Introduction to Linguistics
Structure of Modern English
Backgrounds to Composition Theory and Research
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of English. Majors in the Department of Media, Journalism and Film Studies must select ENG 304.

ENG 8 African American History and Literature

Provides a sustained encounter with the African American experience from the arrival of African Americans to North America through their contemporary cultural and literary accomplishments.

BWS 151Introduction to Black World Studies4
Select two of the following:6
African American Writing, 1746-1877
African American Writing, 1878-1945
African American Writing, 1946-Present
African-American History
Contemporary American Literature
Total Credit Hours10

Note: Not open to majors in black world studies. Majors in the Departments of English and History must complete a minimum of nine hours outside department of major.

ENG 9 Writing for Specialized Audiences:  Print and Online Design and Composition

Provides an introduction to theory, principles, genres, tools, and practices for those who wish to increase their expertise in professional writing.  Through practice and community-based projects, the sequence develops the student’s ability to analyze audiences, design communications to achieve specific goals, test these communications with users, and produce the documents in digital or print media. The first two courses stress visual design and preparing texts for production; students may then choose ENG 413/ENG 513/ ENG 513 or ENG 414/ENG 514/ ENG 514, depending on whether they are interested in genres that report on past activities, request resources, or document processes.

Take one course from each tier.

ENG 411/511Visual Rhetoric3
ENG 412/512Print and Digital Editing3
ENG 413/513Grant and Proposal Writing3
or ENG 414/514 Usability and User Experience
Total Credit Hours9

ENG 10 Italy and the Renaissance

Provides students in the Study Abroad program in Florence, Italy, with an on-site introduction to the arts of the Florentine Renaissance and situates those arts in the Italian cultures that produced and now succeed them. Contextualizing experiences include an introduction to the art form of cinema, with an emphasis on Italian film to engage students with the culture around them; and either an introduction to the Western literatures underlying and embodied in those arts, or an opportunity to investigate and write about contemporary Florentine culture.

ART 399I Italy and The Renaissance2-3
ENG 350CThe Art Film3
JRN 350Specialized Journalism3
or ENG 251 Introduction to European Literature
Total Credit Hours8-9

Note: ART 399, ENG 350, andJRN 350 must be taken in Florence. Only 1 course from Thematic Sequence can count toward a Foundation requirement. If taken to fulfill your thematic sequence, this sequence can fulfill up to 3 credits of your study abroad requirement if you choose to use one of its Florence courses to count toward that requirement.

ESP 1 Entrepreneurship in Different Contexts

Emphasizes the application of entrepreneurial attitudes and behaviors in organizations of all sizes and types. Students explore the underlying nature of entrepreneurship and the entrepreneurial process and develop an appreciation for the unique aspects of entrepreneurship depending upon the context within which one is operating. The first course examines the role of creative thinking in coming up with new, entrepreneurial ideas and solving business problems; the second explores the interface between entrepreneurship and a particular functional area; the third is concerned with entrepreneurship in a larger, established organizational context.

ESP 251Entrepreneurial Value Creation and Capture3
ESP 341Corporate Entrepreneurship3
ESP 351Creativity in Entrepreneurship3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in business.

FRE 1 French Cultural Studies

Explores cultural questions in a French context and how cultural productions can preserve or change social institutions. Provides a continuing analysis of how cultural productions interconnect with specific contexts: historical, aesthetic, social, political, economic, ethnic, racial, gender-related.

Prerequisite: FRE 202. For students planning to take the French Capstone.

FRE 310Texts in Context3
FRE 411/FRE 511French Civilization3
or FRE 411W/FRE 511W French Civilization
Select one of the following:3
Conversation and Current Events in France
Conversation and Current Events in France
Topics in French Literature in Translation
French Cinema in Translation
Studies in Contemporary French Thought in Translation
Topics in French Cinema
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of French and Italian.

FRE 2 French Cultural Studies

Students planning to take a Capstone in another department may take any three of these courses, although FRE 310 (or FRE 301 or the equivalent) is a prerequisite for FRE 411/FRE 511.

Select any three of the following:9-10
Texts in Context
Conversation and Current Events in France
Topics in French Literature in Translation
French Cinema in Translation
French Civilization
Studies in Contemporary French Thought in Translation
Topics in French Cinema
Total Credit Hours9-10

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of French and Italian.

FRE 3 European Cinema

Explores, questions, and seeks to provide a cross-cultural understanding of the historical, ideological, artistic, and social issues that inform European culture through a critical analysis of the major films of countries that have played an important role both in the birth and development of cinematic art and in shaping the modern world: France, Germany, Italy, and the Soviet Union.

FST 201Film History and Analysis3
or ITS 201 Introduction to International Studies
Select two of the following:6
European Jewish Cinema
French Cinema in Translation
Topics in French Cinema
Italian Cinema
Cultures and Identities of Eastern Europe: An Introduction through Literature and Film
German Film in Global Context
Soviet & Post-Soviet Russian Cinema
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Nine hours minimum must be taken outside department of major.

FSW 1 Services and Supports for Children, Youth, and Families

Diversity is increasing among children, youth, families, and their community contexts. A growing number of people, especially African American and Hispanic children and their families, are experiencing the challenges of poverty. Increasing numbers of children and youth are deemed “at risk” for health, social, or educational problems. Amidst increasing diversity and confronted by rapid sociocultural change, existing services and supports are often ineffective; sometimes they may harm the people they intend to serve. Sequence provides experiences and opportunities that facilitate your understanding of children, youth, and families, including their needs, problems, aspirations, and strengths. Learn about and evaluate two kinds of services and supports: (1) educative, promotive, and preventive; and (2) need and problem-oriented, as well as crisis-responsive. Experiences in social service, education, and health organizations where you “shadow” helping professionals are required. As a citizen or future helping professional, prepares you for informed advocacy on the behalf of children, youth, and families.

FSW/KNH 207Serving and Supporting Children, Youth, and Families I4
FSW/KNH 208Serving and Supporting Children, Youth, and Families II5
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Open to all majors. A minimum of nine semester hours must be taken outside department of major.

FSW 3 Families and Sexuality Across the Life Course

The objectives for this thematic sequence are to establish basic concepts and theoretical understandings of individuals in families across the life course, to provide a sound background in human sexuality that may be used as a base to think about underlying issues related to human sexuality, and to explore issues related to familial/relationship contexts involving sexuality and sexual behaviors.

Select one of the following:3-4
Children and Families: Ages Conception - 12
Interpersonal Perspectives on Adulthood and Aging
Adolescent Development in Diverse Families: Ages 13-25
Select the following:
FSW 365Family Life Sexuality Education Across Cultures3
FSW/WGS 361Couple Relationships: Diversity and Change3
Total Credit Hours9-10

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Family Studies and Social Work. Majors in the Departments of Gerontology and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies majors must take a minimum of nine hours outside department of major.

FSW 4 Children in Families

Students develop an in-depth understanding of child and adolescent development that affects contemporary families. Examines issues in contemporary society that affect families with children (e.g., child and adolescent development and family differences, as well as change over the life course).

FSW 245Children and Families: Ages Conception - 123
FSW 481/FSW 581Adolescent Development in Diverse Families: Ages 13-253
FSW 261Diverse Family Systems Across the Life Cycle3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Family Studies and Social Work.

FSW 6 Social Inequality and Social Welfare for Diverse Families and Groups

In this thematic sequence the courses will reflect on social inequality and social welfare for diverse groups and families. This thematic sequence aims to deepen the student's knowledge about social inequality in the use, the history, and development of the US welfare system, and to develop a better understanding of how social policies directly and indirectly influence the well-being of families.

FSW 206Social Welfare: Impact on Diverse Groups4
Select one of the following:3
Introduction to Social Work
Diverse Family Systems Across the Life Cycle
Select the following:
FSW 362Family Poverty3
Total Credit Hours10

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Family Studies and Social Work.

GEO 1 Urban Geography

Applies geographic concepts to develop an understanding of the patterns, processes, and meanings of change within and among U.S. urban areas. The sequence first examines the changing distribution of economic activities and social groups. Second, the sequence is concerned with underlying processes resulting in distinctive distributions of people and activities observed in U.S. urban areas. The sequence also evaluates the problems and consequences for U.S. cities resulting from changing economic and social geography and examines practices and policies for the planning of U.S. urban areas.

GEO 201Geography of Urban Diversity3
GEO 451/GEO 551Urban and Regional Planning3
Select one of the following:3
Urban Geography
Race, Urban Change, and Conflict in America
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Geography.  Majors in Black World Studies must take a minimum of nine hours outside department of major.

GEO 2 Earth's Physical Environment: Patterns and Processes

Provides an understanding of the geographical patterns that characterize the Earth's physical environment and the processes responsible for these geographical patterns. The objectives are to study Earth's physical environment and their geographical distribution at global, regional, and local scales; to develop an understanding of the processes that connect Earth's physical subsystems, including the lithosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and atmosphere; and to apply concepts (e.g., systems and budgets) and geographic tools (e.g., field research, geographic information systems, and remote sensing) to the geographic analysis of a particular environment or set of environments.

GEO 121Earth's Physical Environment3-4
or GEO 122 Geographic Perspectives on the Environment
GEO 221Regional Physical Environments3
Select one of the following:3-4
Global Plant Diversity
Ecoregions of North America
Global Perspectives on Natural Disasters
Hydrogeography
Watershed Management
Soil Geography
Total Credit Hours9-11

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Geography. Majors in the Department of Biology must take a minimum of nine hours outside department of major.

GEO 3 Geographic Change

Applies geographic concepts to understand patterns, processes, and meaning of change in the human landscape at the global scale.

GEO 101Global Forces, Local Diversity3
GEO 211Global Change3
or GEO 276 Geography of the Global Economy
Select one of the following:3
Women, Gender, and the Environment
Global Periphery's Urbanization
Global Poverty
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Geography. Majors in Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies must take a minimum of nine hours outside department of major.

GEO 4 Global Forces in Regional Contexts

Applies geographic concepts to understanding patterns, processes, and underlying meaning of changes in a region's landscape.

Select one of the following:3
Global Forces, Local Diversity
World Regional Geography: Patterns and Issues
Select one of the following:3
Population and Migration
The Rise of Industrialism in East Asia
Global Change
Select one of the following:3-4
Geography of Sub-Saharan Africa
Geography of East Asia
Indigenous Peoples and Their Sacred Lands
Geography of the Silk Road (The Heart of Asia)
Total Credit Hours9-10

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Geography. Majors in Black World Studies must take a minimum of nine hours outside department of major.

GEO 5 Geospatial Techniques

Provides an introduction to geospatial techniques (including GIS, Remote Sensing, and Map Interpretation). Objectives are to build the skills necessary to read and interpret both traditional and digital maps, to gain an understanding of GIS concepts and applications, and to apply this new knowledge by focusing on more advanced GIS tools and applications.

GEO 242Mapping a Changing World3
GEO 441/GEO 541Geographic Information Systems3
Select one of the following:3
Advanced Geographic Information Systems
Python Programming for ArcGIS
GIScience Techniques in Landscape Ecology
Techniques and Applications of Remote Sensing
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Geography. Majors in Black world Studies must take a minimum of nine hours outside department of major.

GER 1 Culture, Literature, and Language of German-Speaking Europe

Explores the way in which culture and language work together as related systems of expression. Course material will be taken, wherever possible, from authentic sources.

Prerequisite: GER 202.

GER 321Cultural Topics in German-Speaking Europe Since 18703
or GER 322 Comparative Study of Everyday Culture: German-Speaking Europe and the U.S.A.
GER 312Coming of Age in German Life and Thought3
or GER 311 Passionate Friendships in German Literature from the Middle Ages to the Present
GER 301German Language Through the Media3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to German majors.

GER 3 Developing Language Skills in German

For students who have completed the first two semesters of college-level German language or the equivalent. This sequence develops speaking, listening, reading, and writing ability using a variety of materials drawn from fiction, television, film, the Internet, journalism, and memoirs. The courses draw on computer-assisted materials developed by the Miami faculty for Miami students and are characterized by small sections and substantial in-class and out-of-class interaction. Courses may not be taken credit/no-credit and must be taken in order.

GER 201Second Year German3
GER 202Second Year German3
GER 301German Language Through the Media3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to German majors.

GLG 1 Oceanography

Provides an appreciation of the critical importance of the oceans to the functioning of our planet. Oceans dominate the surface area of the Earth, and they are critical to the maintenance of a habitable planet. Examines what we know about the oceans and how the oceans are an integral part of the Earth's ecology. Explores, first hand, the ways that we study the oceans.

Select one of the following:3
The Dynamic Earth
Environmental Geology
Geology of U.S. National Parks
Select the following:
GLG 244Oceanography3
GLG 413/GLG 513Tropical Marine Ecology5
Total Credit Hours11

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Geology & Environmental Earth Science.

GLG 2 The Water Planet

Provides an introduction to the essential role water plays in supporting life on Earth, including the origin of water, its physical/chemical characteristics, how these characteristics combine to make life possible on the continents and in the oceans, and details concerning the hydrologic cycle. Introduces the economic, legal, and political ramifications of water use in the U.S.

Select one of the following:3
The Dynamic Earth
Environmental Geology
Geology of U.S. National Parks
Select the following:
GLG 244Oceanography3
Select one of the following:3-4
Hydrogeography
Water and Society
Ice Age Earth
Introduction to Hydrogeology
Limnology
Total Credit Hours9-10

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Geology & Environmental Earth Science. Majors in the Departments of Geography and Biology must take a minimum of nine hours outside department of major.

GLG 3 Plate Tectonics

Provides an overview of how plate tectonics shapes the Earth, including the creation of landforms, natural hazards, and economic reservoirs. Examines the physical principles underlying movement of the Earth’s surface and the impact on rock types, chemistry, fabric, and layering. Also demonstrates how local studies can provide insight into global processes.

Select one of the following:3
The Dynamic Earth
Environmental Geology
Geology of U.S. National Parks
Select the following:
GLG 261Geohazards and the Solid Earth3,4
or GLG 301 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
Select one of the following:3-4
Structural Geology
Geophysics
Seismology
Global Tectonics
Total Credit Hours9-11

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Geology & Environmental Earth Science.

GTY 2 Aging in Diverse Contexts

A significant paradigm shift has occurred within gerontology. The accumulation of research findings suggests that age alone predicts very little about the human experience. Instead, the impact of age and aging is mediated by a range of social and cultural factors. Social characteristics such as gender, race, and ethnicity, and societal factors such as economic development and cultural traditions combine to produce a diverse range of experience and patterns of aging. This thematic sequence begins with an overview of the social, cultural, and personal experiences of aging. The second course provides students with grounding in sociocultural analyses of the contexts of aging, and the third, an in-depth exploration of the sources of variation in the aging experience. Students completing this sequence will understand the ways in which meanings and experiences of aging are shaped by social and physical location, and the ways in which diversity among the older population is produced.

GTY 154Big Ideas in Aging 13
Select one of the following:3
Global Aging 1
Social Forces and Aging
Select one of the following:3
Gender and Aging
Interpersonal Perspectives on Adulthood and Aging
Issues & Controversies in Aging
Total Credit Hours9
1

Only one Foundation (MPF) course can count toward both a Foundation requirement and a Thematic Sequence.

Note: Not open to majors in Sociology or Gerontology. Majors in the Department of Family Studies and Social Work must take a minimum of nine hours outside department of major.

GTY 3 Aging and Health

This thematic sequence explores health and aging. The tier 1 course provides students with an overview of the process of aging, especially in the United States. In tier 2, students select one of two courses, each examining health and aging from a different position along a continuum that ranges from micro- to macro/meso-level contexts. The tier 3 courses offer students the opportunity to integrate academic and applied aspects of health and aging, either through exploration of moral issues in health care, secondary data analysis, or a field experience in a health care setting.

GTY 154Big Ideas in Aging3
Select one of the following:3
Global Aging
Social Forces and Aging
Select one of the folowing:3-4
Aging & Health
Research on Inequality in Aging & Health
Total Credit Hours9-10

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Sociology and Gerontology. Philosophy majors may not take PHL 375.

GTY 4 Aging and Policy

This thematic sequence focuses on age-related policies. It is designed to introduce students to the broad topic of aging in American society, policies and programs, and fill a gap in the current curriculum by analyzing and debating current aging policy topics.

GTY 154Big Ideas in Aging3
GTY 365Social Policy and Programs in Gerontology3
GTY 465Policies & Programs in an Aging Society3
Total Credit Hours9

NOTE: Not open to majors in Sociology or Gerontology. Majors in the Department of Family Studies and Social Work must take a minimum of nine hours outside department of major.

HST 3 Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies

This Thematic Sequence examines Russian, East European and Eurasian history and politics from a multidisciplinary perspective. The Sequence allows students to study the history and politics of Russia and the former Soviet republics, from medieval times to today. Drawing from a range of disciplines and approaches, students have the opportunity to explore historical patterns, and political movements and parties from the 10th century to present. By considering this interaction, students gain meaningful insights into the development of this region as well as acquiring useful perspectives on western society. Because many of these courses are cross-listed, students from many different majors will be able to take the sequence by enrolling in the course through a department other than their major. Take one course from each tier.

REL/RUS 133Imagining Russia3
or HST/ITS/POL/REL/RUS 254 Introduction to Russian and Eurasian Studies
Select one of the following:3
Russia and Eurasia: Anthropological Perspectives
Eurasian Nomads and History
History of the Russian Empire
The Soviet Union and Beyond
Russia's War and Peace
Communism and Soviet Politics, 1917-1991
Religions of Russia and Eurasia
Select one of the following:3
Anthropology of Capitalism: Russia
Geography of the Silk Road (The Heart of Asia)
Havighurst Colloquium
Issues in Post-Soviet Euraisa
Politics of Central Asia
Post-Soviet Russian Politics
Politics of Eastern Europe
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Nine hours minimum must be taken outside department of major.

ISA 1 Quantitative Concepts for Managerial Decision Making

Enhances analytical capabilities and provides breadth and depth of course work in decision science methodology. While its contextual orientation is business, the techniques and processes discussed and ways of thinking developed are applicable to every field. The underlying aim is improved decision making and action through thought that is informed by statistical and management science methodologies.

ISA 205Business Statistics4
ISA 291Applied Regression Analysis in Business3
ISA 321Quantitative Analysis of Business Problems3
Total Credit Hours10

Note: Not open to majors in business.

ISA 2 Applied Business Statistics

Enhances analytical capabilities and teaches fundamental concepts of statistical thinking. Provides breadth and depth of course work in business statistics methodology. While the academic area of business forms its contextual orientation, the techniques and processes discussed and ways of thinking developed are applicable to every field. The underlying aim is improved decision making and action through thought that is informed by statistical analysis.

ISA 205Business Statistics4
ISA 291Applied Regression Analysis in Business3
Select one of the following:3
Statistical Monitoring and Design of Experiments
Survey Sampling in Business
Business Forecasting
Introduction to Data Mining in Business
Total Credit Hours10

ISA 3 Web Mining and Knowledge Management

Emphasizes the critical role of information management and decision-making within a wireless, distributed Internet environment and enables students to develop a proficiency in knowledge management, Internet access/retrieval, and web searching/mining of information and data that promotes and enhances the e-commerce opportunity and the digital economy. The sequence focuses on technology management, strategic evaluation, and systems adoption issues by organizations in order to gain a competitive advantage in the new Internet society and associated wireless environment. Please take these courses in order.

ISA 235Information Technology and the Intelligent Enterprise3
ISA 245Database Systems and Data Warehousing3
ISA 401/ISA 501Business Intelligence and Data Visualization3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in business.

ISA 4 Applications Integration with Enterprise Systems

Emphasizes the critical role of information resources planning, management, and/or implementation in the electronic commerce era. In specific, this sequences enables students to develop a proficiency in the management of enterprise resources planning tools, concepts, and/or techniques to increase corporations' productivity, operational efficiency, and effectiveness. Please take these courses in order.

ISA 235Information Technology and the Intelligent Enterprise3
ISA 245Database Systems and Data Warehousing3
ISA 303Enterprise Systems3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in business.

ITL 1 Italy in the Renaissance

Analyzes the vital role Italy has played in the birth and evolution of modern Western culture in the humanities, arts, sciences, and political thought. Develops analytical skills by viewing Italian culture from a variety of disciplinary angles and over a broad span of time. Promotes a critical understanding of the rich artistic, literary, and intellectual heritage of the culture that laid the foundation for the European Renaissance and the modern period.

Select three of the following:9
The Renaissance in Italy
From Marco Polo to Machiavelli
Dante's Divine Comedy
The Renaissance
Florence in the Time of the Republic, 1250-1550
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Nine hours minimum must be taken outside department of major.

JPN 1 Developing Language Skills in Japanese

For students who have completed the first two semesters of college-level Japanese language or the equivalent. This sequence develops speaking, listening, reading, and writing ability using a variety of materials drawn from fiction, television, film, the Internet, journalism, and memoirs. The courses draw on computer-assisted materials developed by Miami faculty for Miami students and are characterized by small sections and substantial in-class and out-of-class interaction. Courses may not be taken credit/no-credit and must be taken in order.

JPN 201Second Year Japanese3
JPN 202Second Year Japanese3
JPN 301Third Year Japanese3
Total Credit Hours9

JST 1 Jewish Studies

Emerging in the ancient Middle East, the Jewish people developed a distinctive culture and tradition, first as an independent body-politic and later as a minority population in the Diaspora. Throughout history, the Jewish people have utilized their ancestral customs – i.e. Judaism – to maintain a living identity. This Thematic Sequence focuses on the history of Jewish communities in a variety of contexts in order to discern how Jews maintained their identity while partaking of and contributing to the non-Jewish world. These classes examine secular and religious Jewish cultures in Europe, America, North Africa and Asia from ca. 600 B.C.E. until today.

Ancient and Medieval
Select one of the following:3
Medieval Jewish History
Ancient Jewish History
Introduction to the Critical Study of Biblical Literature 1
Global Jewish Civilization
Religions of the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible 1
Modern
Select one of the following:3
European Jewish Cinema
Jews in Modern France: Between Image and Experience
Cultures and Identities of Eastern Europe: An Introduction through Literature and Film
The German-Jewish Experience 1
Germany 1918-1945
Global Jewish Civilization
Select one additional course from Ancient or Modern.3
Total Credit Hours9
1

Only one Foundation (MPF) course can count toward both a Foundation requirement and a Thematic Sequence.

Note: This sequence is open to all majors, but students must take only courses outside department of major.

LAS 3 Latino Studies: Cultures and Histories of Latinos in the United States

This sequence gives students a broad understanding of the diverse histories and cultures of Latina/o populations living in the United States and emphasizes how Latina/o cultural politics in the United States are shaped in relation to both cultural formations within Latin American and racial/ethnic dynamics within the United States.

LAS 208Introduction to Latin America 13
Select one of the following:3
Latino/a Literature and the Americas 1
Latin America in the United States 1
Select one of the following:3
Latin American Diaspora: Communities, Conditions and Issues
Latin American Popular Culture
Total Credit Hours9
1

Only one Foundation (MPF) course can count toward both a Foundation requirement and a Thematic Sequence.

LED 1 Urban Culture and Service-Learning

Courses selected for the Xavier University/Miami University collaboration are determined each time it is offered. Courses will emphasize urban study, drawing from political science, sociology, economics, geography, architecture, history, education, and programs in black world studies, urban studies, American studies, and women's studies. The sequence will have courses grouped in three interrelated tiers:

  1. Practical experience based in Service-Learning; and
  2. Theoretical investigation of urban issues and policy; and
  3. Special topics that allow for deeper investigations of issues pertaining to Cincinnati and Over-The-Rhine. Contact: Tom Dutton in the Department of Architecture

MBI 1 Biomedical Science

Examines principles and examples of diseases caused by microbial infections so that the role of microorganisms in the development of disease in a human host can be understood. Studies the host at genetic or cell and tissue level to gain an overview of infectious and noninfectious diseases in populations. Fosters understanding of the effects of diseases on human communities and provides a perspective to help evaluate health dilemmas and develop strategies to solve them.

MBI 161Elementary Medical Microbiology4
BIO 232Human Heredity3,4
or BIO 325 Pathophysiology
MBI 361Epidemiology3
Total Credit Hours10-11

Note: Offered only on the Hamilton and Middletown campuses. Not open to majors in the Departments of Biology or Microbiology.

MBI 2 Molecular Genetics

Provides an understanding of the basic microbiology principles that have provided the foundation for the development of the science of molecular genetics. Shows how the application of molecular genetics has had a significant impact on health, bioremediation, and agriculture, to name a few examples.

MBI/BIO 116Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular and Molecular Biology4
MBI 201General Microbiology4
MBI 365Molecular and Cell Biology3
Total Credit Hours11

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Microbiology.

MGT 1 Dynamics of Human Behavior in Organizations

Regardless of major, most students apply the knowledge and skills they acquire at Miami University within an organizational setting. Organizations form to benefit from collective efforts of individuals who are striving to accomplish a set of common goals. This sequence examines ideas, models, and theories that explain human behavior in organizations. Builds competence in critically analyzing factors that influence both human behavior and the capacity for the organization to achieve its objectives; then you are able to influence work behavior and effectively exercise a leadership role in the organizations you join.

MGT 291Introduction to Management & Leadership3
MGT 414Employee Engagement and Motivation 13
MGT 415Leadership and Learning 13
Total Credit Hours9
1

May be taken in any order.

Note: Not open to majors in business.

MKT 5 Creating Customer Value Through Marketing

The objectives of this sequence are to:

  1. Introduce students to the behavioral, sociological, psychological, and economic foundations behind marketing;
  2. Create an understanding of how marketing can improve the quality of life through enlightened personal selling;
  3. Assist non-marketing majors to apply marketing concepts to a broad spectrum of personal and professional careers.
MKT 291Principles of Marketing3
MKT 325Consumer Behavior3
MKT 405Creating Customer Value through Marketing3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in business.

MTH 1 Axioms, Theorems, and Proof in Geometry and Algebra

Considers algebras and geometries defined by axiomatic systems, two very active fields in modern mathematics. Surprises are here: geometries without parallel lines, geometries with parallel lines and no rectangles, and new algebraic operations that can describe the structure of Rubik's cube and molecules. Develops the roles of definition, proof, and abstraction gradually until, at the 400 level, a full scale axiomatic treatment is given. At this level students provide many of the proofs. You rediscover results from the masters: Gauss, Hilbert, Galois, Abel, and others. Not an easy sequence, but you learn about how to read mathematics and solve problems on your own.

Prerequisite:MTH 251 or MTH 249/ MTH 249H

MTH 222Introduction to Linear Algebra3
MTH 331Proof: Introduction to Higher Mathematics3
MTH 411/MTH 511Foundations of Geometry3
or MTH 421/MTH 521 Introduction to Abstract Algebra
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Mathematics.

MTH 2 Basic Mathematical Tools for Science

Scientists today use a variety of mathematical tools, including calculus, discrete mathematics, and statistics to describe physical, biological, and social systems. This sequence helps students analyze problems from several perspectives with increasing sophistication as they progress from Calculus I through the other courses. The discrete mathematics, linear algebra, and statistics courses can be taken in any order, but all have Calculus I as prerequisite.

MTH 151Calculus I4-5
or MTH 153 Calculus I
Select one of the following:2-3
Introduction to Linear Algebra
Introduction to Linear Algebra (Honors)
Proof: Introduction to Higher Mathematics (H)
Elements of Discrete Mathematics
Select the following:
ECE 345Applied Probability and Statistics for Engineers3
or STA 301 Applied Statistics
Total Credit Hours9-11

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Mathematics. Business majors will not receive credit for this sequence.

MTH 3 Almost Linear Structures-Models for Physical Science

The goal is to extend the derivative and anti-derivative ideas from Calculus I and II by building on the linear function concept from MTH 222. Scientists use linear functions to model the economy, atomic structure, chemical reactions, and other phenomena. MTH 252 develops the derivative of a multivariable function as an approximating linear function, just as the graph of a function of one variable looks like a line segment near a point where the derivative exists. This allows the extension of important optimization techniques to multivariable functions. MTH 347 uses all available tools to generalize and solve antiderivative problems crucial to science. This sequence combines theory and practice and is the traditional path to upper division mathematics. MTH 222 and MTH 252 may be taken in either order or concurrently.

Prerequisite: Calculus I and Calculus II.

MTH 222Introduction to Linear Algebra3
or MTH 222T/331T Introduction to Linear Algebra (Honors)
MTH 252Calculus III4
MTH 347Differential Equations3
Total Credit Hours10

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Mathematics.

MUS 1 Performance of Music

Study and apply music performance in solo and ensemble settings in order to examine and evaluate musical style, emotional and programmatic aspects of composition in performance, the interrelationship of instruments in larger contexts, and the involvement of personal technique, style, and emotional context.

Prerequisite: Not for beginning performers. Admission only to students granted “sophomore standing” by the music department after an audition or semester-end jury following enrollment in MUS 142 or MUS 144.

Three semesters minimum of private study 16
A minimum of two ensemble experiences 23
Juried half-recital (20 minutes of music minimum) given in your junior or senior year (0). The recital must be a lecture-recital or must have program notes written by you.0
Total Credit Hours9
1

Including at least one semester at 300-level with a prerequisite of "junior standing" granted by the music department after a semester-end jury following enrollment in MUS 242 or MUS 244.

Courses available: MUS 242, MUS 342; MUS 244,MUS 344.

2

MUS 100E cannot fulfill this requirement. You are encouraged to be involved in more than one ensemble for the duration of the sequence.

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Music.

MUS 3 African and African-Derived Music in the Western World

Focuses on the development and influence of African-derived music in the western world, which includes not only North America but also the Caribbean and South America. The subject is examined from several historical as well as musical perspectives:

  1. African music in the traditional context and its defining factors on the lives and culture of Western African societies and people;

  2. The Atlantic slave trade and the development of African-influenced genres in the West;

  3. The impact of the development of and changes in Western societies (i.e., emancipation, segregation, unemployment, etc.) and the music that results.

At the conclusion of this sequence, students should be able to integrate the material covered into their knowledge of American musical and social history and have a deeper understanding of how societal structures and racial identity have affected music.

MUS/AMS 285Introduction to African American Music3
MUS 385The Roots of Black Music: Blues, Gospel and Soul3
MUS/AMS 386The History and Development of Hip Hop Culture in America3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Music.

NSC 1 Naval Science: History of Warfare

Examines the evolution of strategic principles and the influence of economic, psychological, moral, political, and technological factors on strategic thought. Covers the evolution of warfare from 500 B.C. into future, naval warfare from 1500 into the future, and amphibious warfare from 1800 to present. Through literature, you are exposed to differing perspectives, including official records of the event, personal experiences of participants, and post-event analysis by researchers. Engage in a critical analysis of great leaders, military organizations, and military theorists of history.

NSC 311The Evolution of Warfare 13
NSC 202Sea Power and Maritime Affairs Seminar3
NSC 411Fundamentals of Maneuver Warfare 13
Total Credit Hours9
1

 Taught in alternating fall semesters.

Note: Open to all majors. This thematic sequence requires two full academic years to complete.

NSC 2 War: An Extension of Politics

Examines world politics, historical role played by the military in the outcome of those politics, and possible political methods to avoid future military action. Explores the complexity of world politics driven by differences in economics, population, culture, and philosophy, and studies the historical outcome of incidents where military action occurred as well as those incidents resolved without military involvement.

Select one of the following:3
U.S. Foreign Relations Since 1898
World Politics
International Security Issues
Select one of the following:3
Sea Power and Maritime Affairs Seminar
The Evolution of Warfare
Fundamentals of Maneuver Warfare
Select one of the following:3-4
20th Century European Diplomacy
American Foreign Policy
Foreign Policy Analysis
Global Governance
International Law
Total Credit Hours9-10

Note: Students must select a minimum of nine hours outside department of major.

NSC 3 The Naval Sciences: An Integrated Study of Naval Engineering, Navigation, and Piloting

Going to sea and surviving for extended periods of time require unique and diverse knowledge in these subject areas. Engages in a critical examination of naval engineering systems, celestial and electronic navigation, and the practice of safely piloting a waterborne vessel.

NSC 102Naval Ship's Systems3
NSC 301Navigation3
NSC 302Naval Operations and Seamanship3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Open to all majors.

PHL 1 Ethics

Develops insight and expertise in dealing with ethical matters that you are likely to confront in your personal and professional life beyond the university.

Select one of the following:3
Society and the Individual
Theories of Human Nature
Introduction to Ethics
Select two of the following:6-8
Ethical Theory
Political Philosophy
Feminist Theory
Confronting Death
Medical Ethics
Environmental Philosophy
Existentialism
Total Credit Hours9-11

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Philosophy. Students must take nine hours outside department of major.

PHL 4 Metaphysics and Epistemology

Presents a range of philosophical outlooks and methods regarding the fundamental questions: what is real and how do we know it? Explores these questions as they are manifested in the history of philosophy.

PHL 104Purpose or Chance in the Universe3
or PHL 105 Theories of Human Nature
PHL 221of Metaphysics and Knowledge3
PHL 301Ancient Philosophy4
or PHL 302 Modern Philosophy
Total Credit Hours10

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Philosophy.

PHL 5 Reasoning

Focuses on the fundamental aspects of logic, as manifested in thought and language. Shows that reasoning occurs in both formal and interpretive modes and that principles exist for the analysis and evaluation of reasoning in these modes. The emphasis is on developing skill in the application of such principles and on an appreciation of the overall scope of logic.

PHL 273Formal Logic4
PHL 263Informal Logic3
PHL 373Symbolic Logic4
Total Credit Hours11

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Philosophy.

PHY 1 The Physical World: Contemporary Physics

  • Option One - experimental emphasis, stresses experimental, hands-on experience in the laboratory.
  • Option Two - theoretical emphasis, stresses modeling and simulation approaches to problem solving.

Extends the basic foundation in the broad area of physics developed in “The Physical World.” Provides in-depth developments of topics in modern and contemporary physical science. The goal is to provide a level of understanding and skills in contemporary scientific methodology to enable further study in the sciences or to provide a substantial technical background for a future career.

PHY 192General Physics with Laboratory II5
PHY 281
PHY 293
Contemporary Physics I: Foundations
and Contemporary Physics Laboratory
5
Select one of the following options:3-5
Experimental Option:
Electronic Instrumentation
and Laboratory in Electronic Instrumentation
Theoretical Option:
Introduction to Computational Physics
Total Credit Hours13-15

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Physics. Although laboratory sections are listed as separate courses in this Bulletin, they are integral co-requisites to the companion courses.

PHY 2 Your Place In the Universe

For untold generations, humans have gazed at the stars, planets, and cosmos, and asked what is it all, and how do I fit in? This sequence attempts to address this timeless, universal, and totally human question from the viewpoint of modern science. The Foundation course provides an overview of our present understanding of the universe and some insight as to how we came to such an understanding. The second course addresses the crucial question, how do we know what we claim to know? Here, the observational foundation of our theories is examined in detail. The final course addresses several topics from astronomy that currently are without explanation.

PHY 111Astronomy and Space Physics3
PHY 211Observational Foundations of Astronomy3
PHY 311Contemporary Astronomy3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Physics.

PHY 3 Physics in Living Systems

This sequence provides the physical and biological foundations for understanding the role physics plays in living systems. There are two options for emphasis; the biophysical option develops and explores physical models used in understanding biological systems and biological phenomena; the medical option emphasizes the physical basis of the various diagnostic and therapeutic technologies used in medicine.

PHY 192General Physics with Laboratory II5
BIO 203Introduction to Cell Biology3
PHY 421/PHY 521Molecular and Cellular Biophysics4
or PHY 422/PHY 522 Physics for Medicine and Biology
Total Credit Hours12

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Physics.

POL 3 National Political Institutions

Enables you to understand the political system in which you live, how it operates or fails to do so, where and how citizen influence is applied, and how to assess proposals for reform. Take POL 241 first, then select three additional courses from the options listed. Sequence of four courses.

POL 241American Political System3
Select three of the following:9
American Presidency
U.S. Congress
Constitutional Law and Politics
Constitutional Rights and Liberties
Mass Media and Politics
Total Credit Hours12

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Political Science.

POL 6 Public Management and Leadership

Students will gain an understanding of the importance and workings of governmental agencies, their influence on society and daily life, and their prospects for promoting the general welfare. Furthermore, students will be confronted with both theoretical issues and practical problems in the courses, encouraging them to be real-world problem solvers through an understanding of the "fourth branch" of government, the bureaucracy.

POL 261Public Administration3
Select two of the following:6
Public Management, Leadership, and Administrative Politics
Federalism and Intergovernmental Relations
State and Local Government and Politics
Public Budgeting
Public Personnel Administration
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Political Science.

PSY 1 Perspectives on Psychopathology

Uses a psychological perspective to consider the personal and interpersonal experience of psychopathology and to analyze the impact of psychopathology on society as a whole. Begins with a general examination of individual and social psychopathology and builds toward in-depth exploration of selected specific individual or social issues related to psychopathology.

Prerequisite: PSY 111.

PSY 242Abnormal Psychology3
PSY 343Psychopathology3
PSY 345Childhood Psychopathology and Developmental Disabilities3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Psychology.

PSY 2 Patterns in Human Development

Throughout life, our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors change. How does our biological makeup interact with our physical and social surroundings to contribute to our actions and abilities? A scientific approach to developmental psychology requires us to think critically in examining theories and research and to understand the contexts in which we develop and the contexts in which theories and research are conducted. In this thematic sequence, you will engage with other learners as you reflect on ideas about why we develop the way we do. Such reflection provides an informed basis for acting on issues affecting infants, children, adolescents, and their families in diverse contexts.

Prerequisite: PSY 111 or EDP 101

PSY 231Developmental Psychology3
PSY 332Child Development3
Select one of the following:3
Infant Development
Adolescent Development
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Psychology. Majors in the Departments of Educational Psychology and Family Studies and Social Work must take a minimum of nine hours outside department of major.

PSY 4 Developmental Patterns in Adulthood

Throughout life, our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors change. Adulthood and aging are a culmination of lifespan development. How does our biological makeup interact with our physical and social surroundings to contribute to our actions and abilities? A scientific approach to the study of aging requires us to think critically in examining theories and research and to understand the contexts in which we develop and the contexts in which theories and research are conducted.

Prerequisite: PSY 111 or EDP 101.

PSY 231Developmental Psychology3
PSY 334Adulthood and Aging3
Select one of the following:3
Interpersonal Perspectives on Adulthood and Aging
Sport, Leisure, and Aging
Gender and Aging
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Psychology. Majors in the Departments of Black World Studies, Educational Psychology, Family Studies and Social Work, Kinesiology and Health, Sociology and Gerontology, and Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies must take a minimum of nine hours outside department of major.

PSY 5 Cognition: Understanding and Improving Thought

Offers opportunity to reflect upon reasoning, those processes used to create, maintain, modify, and evaluate beliefs about the world. Begins by introducing the study of cognition within the discipline of psychology; the second course emphasizes specific cognitive processes (e.g., language) and methods and theories associated with their study; the third course offers an in-depth analysis of current theories and methods of studying cognition within a circumscribed topic area.

PSY 271Survey of Perception, Action, and Cognition3
PSY 372Learning and Cognition3
or PSY 374 Psychology of Language and Thought
or PSY 376 Psychology of Judgment, Decision Making, and Reasoning
PSY 470Seminar in Cognition3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Psychology.

PSY 6 Applied Leadership and Pedagogy

The redesigned introductory psychology (PSY 111) course focuses on developing skills used by psychologists in using evidence to support their beliefs. Students will be invited to participate in leadership training (PSY 211) that will train them to lead small discussion groups of introductory psychology students (PSY 212) in which the leaders guide students in practicing their use of these critical thinking skills. The final course (PSY 313) promotes reflection on their experience as a discussion leader and provides an opportunity to engage in a facet of their experience in more depth. These goals are achieved by pursuing a project designed as part of their practicum experience in PSY 212, engaging in an additional pedagogical experience, mentoring new discussion leaders or taking another course approved by the faculty member teaching PSY 313.

With respect to the subject-matter of how psychologists/scientists use evidence: Participants in this thematic sequence begin as students "learning" principles of scientific thinking (PSY 111). The second course (PSY 211) affords the students more advanced training in the skills of how scientists use evidence. The third course (PSY 212) affords students the opportunity to serve as guides for students in PSY 111 learning the same principles for the first time. Finally, PSY 313 affords students the opportunity to use their prior experiences as the basis to guided inquiry into the nature of learning and pedagogy. 

PSY 111Introduction to Psychology3
PSY 211
PSY 212
Psychological Perspectives on Leadership and Pedagogy in the College Classroom
and Practicum in Leadership and Pedagogy
5
PSY 313Advancing in Leadership and Pedagogy1-3
Total Credit Hours9-11

REL 1 Religion and American Life

Acquaints you with fundamental themes in the relationship between religion and society, as exemplified in the development of American religious pluralism in theory and practice, as well as in the impact of religious themes in the development of an American cultural identity.

REL 101Introduction to the Study of Religion3
Select one of the following:3
Religions of the American Peoples
Religious Pluralism in Modern America
Women, Religion and Social Change in America
Select one of the following:3-4
Protestantism and the Development of American Culture
African-American Religions
Issues in the Study of Native American Religions
Total Credit Hours9-10

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Comparative Religion.

REL 2 The Historical and Comparative Study of Religion

Uses the approach of the history of religions to provide perspective continuity and depends heavily on the study and interpretation of classical foreign-language texts in English translation, while using case studies, surveys, and field reports. Unlike some sequences in the humanities that concentrate on religious ideas and doctrines, this sequence utilizes categories developed from the field of comparative religion to acquaint students with the diversity of religious phenomena. Emphasizes the importance of studying religion in a comparative and global context; allows a choice of emphasis of either major Eastern or Western religious traditions, at the second level.

REL 101Introduction to the Study of Religion3
REL 201Methods for the Study of Religion3
Select one of the following:3
Introduction to Buddhism
Global Jewish Civilization
African-American Religions
Religion and Law
The Religious Roots of Anti-Semitism
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Comparative Religion.

RUS 1 Russia and the Soviet Union

Examines Russian culture, society, and politics from an interdisciplinary perspective, including major Russian literary works, historical patterns, and political leaders and parties from the 10th century to the present. By considering this interaction, you gain meaningful insights into the development of Russia as well as acquire useful perspectives on Western society.

RUS/ENG 255Russian Literature in English Translation From Pushkin to Dostoevsky3
or RUS/ENG 256 Russian Literature in English Translation: From Tolstoy to Nabokov
Select one of the following:3
History of the Russian Empire
The Soviet Union and Beyond
Select one of the following:3
Communism and Soviet Politics, 1917-1991
Post-Soviet Russian Politics
Politics of Eastern Europe
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to Russian majors or majors in the Departments of History or Political Science.

RUS 2 Russian Culture

Examines Russian culture from the point of view of artistic media, including major literary works, films, and varieties of folkloric expression. Russian folklore, film, and literature often explore some of the same issues, central to the society they reflect, like rebellion and revolution, alienation and the creation of a community, and the intricacies of social and sexual relationships. Through the study of diverse elite and popular approaches to these topics, you gain an appreciation of some pervasive Russian attitudes and concerns.

RUS 137Russian Folklore3
or RUS/ENG 255 Russian Literature in English Translation From Pushkin to Dostoevsky
RUS/ENG 256Russian Literature in English Translation: From Tolstoy to Nabokov3
or RUS 257/ENG 267 Russian Literature in English Translation: From Pasternak to the Present
FST/RUS 263Soviet and Post-Soviet Russian Cinema3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to Russian majors.

RUS 3 Developing Language Skills in Russian

For students who have completed the first two semesters of college-level Russian language or the equivalent. This sequence develops speaking, listening, reading, and writing ability using a variety of materials drawn from textbooks, fiction, the Internet and journalism as well as multimedia. The courses are characterized by small sections and in-class and out-of-class interaction. Courses may not be taken credit/no-credit and must be taken in order.

RUS 201Intermediate Russian3
RUS 202Intermediate Russian3
RUS 301Advanced Russian3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to Russian majors.

SBI 1 Miami's Professional Institute for Management Education (PRIME)

Students will acquire a basic understanding of how businesses and people work together, providing synergy with the student's chosen major. Four-week program is designed to help talented non-business students develop a clear advantage in the competitive job market. The sequence assumes that you have no prior knowledge of business topics and is intended to make business learning interesting, accessible, and valuable to students in all majors.

Prerequisite: Students must have 60 hours of college credit and permission of the instructor.

BUS 301Macro Concepts in Contemporary Business3
BUS 302Micro Concepts in Contemporary Business3
BUS 303Business Process Integration3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to students with majors or minors in business.

SDT 1 Self-Designed Thematic Sequence

The purpose of the self-designed thematic sequence is to provide students with the opportunity to design a specialized thematic sequence beyond those that are currently offered. This sequence should be based on the student's interests, career, goals, and intellectual interests. A proposal must be submitted to the Office of Liberal Education for approval (313 Laws Hall or visit www.MiamiOH.edu/liberal-ed) before the last 6 hours have been completed. This is a preapproval process.

SJS 1 Social Justice and Inequalities

The goal of this sequence is to introduce students to social justice studies from a sociological perspective, with particular focus on social inequalities. The objectives of the sequence are:

  1. to explain how various sociological and philosophical theories of justice contribute differentially to human rights and social justice-based policies, programs, and declarations/covenants at both national and global levels;
  2. to evaluate consistencies and disparities between micro- and macro-level efforts to achieve social justice;
  3. to develop core sociological concepts and theories across the three levels of courses;
  4. to facilitate and guide personal insight and reflection for acting in a morally just way.
SOC/SJS 165Introduction to Social Justice Studies3
Select one of the following:3
Asia and Globalization
Introduction to the Sociology of Globalization
Work and Occupational Justice
Select one of the following:3
Race and Ethnic Relations
Social Stratification
Social Justice and Change
Globalization, Social Justice and Human Rights
Total Credit Hours9

SJS 2 Social Justice, Law, and Crime

The goal of this sequence is to introduce students to social justice studies from a sociological perspective, with particular focus on law and crime. The objectives of the sequence are:

  1. to explain how various sociological and philosophical theories of justice contribute differentially to justice-based policies, programs and declarations/covenants at both national and global levels;
  2. to evaluate consistencies and disparities between micro- and macro-level efforts to achieve social justice;
  3. to link core sociological concepts and theories across the three levels of courses;
  4. to facilitate personal insights for reflecting and acting in a morally just way.
SJS/SOC 165Introduction to Social Justice Studies3
SOC 201Social Problems4
or SOC 202 Social Deviance
Select one of the following:3
Criminology
Systems of Justice
Sociology of Law
Juvenile Delinquency
Total Credit Hours10

SOC 3 Sociological Perspectives on Inequality

Uses a sociological perspective to approach the issues of social, political, and economic inequality in contemporary society, paying particular attention to inequality as it is determined by class, race, and gender. Begins with an examination of theories of social stratification; then follows a sequence of courses that allows you to develop an in-depth understanding of the major dimensions of social inequality.

Prerequisite: SOC 151 or SOC 153 or BWS 151.

SOC/WGS 203Sociology of Gender3
BWS/SOC 348Race and Ethnic Relations3
or BWS 248 African-American Experience
SOC 372Social Stratification3
or SOC 417 Economy and Society
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Departments of Sociology and Gerontology.  Majors in the Departments of Black World Studies and Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies must take a minimum of nine hours outside department of major.

SOC 4 Sociological Perspectives on Criminality and Deviance

Students will use the social dynamics of history and a sociological perspective to understand and critique conformity, crime, deviance, and the justice system in contemporary society, paying particular attention to the social construction of legality, normality, and crime as influenced by various cultural contexts. The sequence begins with an examination of the basic theories and components of deviance/conformity, then follows a sequence of courses that allows them to examine and develop an understanding of the criminology field and concludes with an advanced course. Students must apply for this Thematic Sequence; enrollment is limited.

SOC 201Social Problems4
or SOC 202 Social Deviance
SOC 352Criminology3
Select one of the following:3
Systems of Justice
Topics in Criminology
Juvenile Delinquency
Total Credit Hours10

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Sociology and Gerontology.

SOC 5 Gender and Family Studies

Sequence exposes students to the major sociological contributions to gender and family issues and gives them experience in connecting the substantive content in the courses. Objectives include:

  1. demonstrating how various sociological theories differentially contribute to our understanding of gender, sexuality, and families;
  2. linking the core concepts sociologists employ across three levels of courses;
  3. highlighting how definitional issues and current research in gender, sexuality, and family intersect, and
  4. deriving personal insights for reflecting and acting regarding one's position in the social structure as to gender, sexuality, and family.
SOC/WGS 203Sociology of Gender3
SOC/WGS/FSW 221Sexualities3
FSW 363Sociology of Families3
or FSW 466/FSW 566 Interpersonal Perspectives on Adulthood and Aging
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Sociology and Gerontology. Majors in the Departments of Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies and Family Studies and Social Work must take a minimum of nine hours outside department of major.

SOC 6 Medical Sociology

This thematic sequence focuses on social factors in health and illness and the structure and function of health care systems globally. Students completing the sequence will be able to articulate differences between the sociological model and medical model of health and illness; explain how health is stratified by social factors such as gender, age, race-ethnicity, and social class; describe the U.S. health care system and contrast it with that of other nations; identify key ethical issues in health care; critically evaluate the stratification and socialization of health care professionals; and analyze the function and structure of various health care settings.

SOC 151Social Relations3-4
or SOC 153 Sociology in a Global Context
Select one of the following:3
Population
Internship: An Introduction to Applied Sociology and Human Services
The Sociology of Mental Disorders
Select the following:
SOC 357Medical Sociology3
Total Credit Hours9-10

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Sociology and Gerontology.

SPA 2 Exploring Social Emotional and Communication Consequences in Special Populations

Offers students the opportunity to develop insight into:

  1. the problems facing physically, mentally, communicatively, culturally, or socially challenged individuals in our society;
  2. the development of structures and environments needed for such individuals to communicate effectively, and
  3. how these environmental modifications can be implemented. Provides specific information on recognizing and treating physical and communicative disorders, with emphasis placed on those problems that impact the normal development of speech, hearing, and language.
SPA 127Introduction to Communication Disorders3
EDP 256Psychology of the Exceptional Learner3
or SPA 223 Theories of Language Development
Select one of the following:3
Methods II: Learners with Mild to Moderate Disabilities
Language Disorders
Alternative Communication Systems for the Severely Handicapped
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology. Special Education majors must take a minimum of nine hours outside department of major.

SPN 1 Literature and Culture in Spain

Focuses on the literature of Spain, exploring the relationships between texts, history, and culture. SPN 315, a Foundation course, emphasizes skills in the analysis and interpretation of Spanish texts; SPN 351 explores social and historical circumstances from the Arab occupation of Al Andalús through the period of the Catholic empire, colonial expansion and early modernity; SPN 352 focuses on the cultural history of Spain from the 18th-century to the present, with an emphasis on 20th century Spain. All courses taught in Spanish, and all work is completed in Spanish.

Prerequisite: SPN 311. Courses must be taken in order.

SPN 315Intro to Hispanic Literatures3
SPN 351Cultural History of Spain I3
SPN 352Cultural History of Spain II3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

SPN 2 Literature and Culture in Spanish America

Focuses on the literature of Spanish America, exploring the interrelationships among texts, history, and culture. SPN 315, a Foundation course, emphasizes skills in the analysis and interpretation of Spanish American texts; SPN 361 explores social and historical circumstances (colonialism through national independence, issues of national development) as represented in Spanish American literature; SPN 362 continues to focus on cultural and historical circumstances in Spanish American literature from the nineteenth to the twenty-first century. All courses taught in Spanish, and all work is completed in Spanish.

Prerequisite: SPN 311. Courses must be taken in order.

SPN 315Intro to Hispanic Literatures3
SPN 361Spanish American Cultural History I3
SPN 362Spanish American Cultural History II3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

SPN 3 Spanish Linguistics and Culture

Focuses on the study of language as a sign of cultural identity and as a social marker. Although the focus is on Spanish, the general goal is to develop the students' ability to think critically about the connection between language and the social and cultural contexts in which it develops and exists. Students will learn to collect and interpret linguistic data, discuss historical events and conditions that have determined the evolution of Spanish dialects and the establishment of a standard, and evaluate current linguistic conflicts in the Spanish-speaking world.

SPN 312Introduction to Spanish Language/Linguistics3
SPN 381Spanish Language and Hispanic Culture I3
SPN 382Spanish Language and Hispanic Culture II3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

STA 1 Quality Issues in Contemporary Business and Industry

Provides sufficient understanding of the factors influencing quality and organizational productivity. Upon completion, you should be able to critically examine work systems and play a leading role in the improvement of any work process in which you are involved. Key themes include: data based decision-making, use of statistical tools for process analysis and quality improvement, measurement of quality, Total Quality Management, quality leadership, employee involvement, and the relationship between work processes and quality improvement systems.

ISA 205Business Statistics4
or STA 301 Applied Statistics
MGT 302Introduction to Operations and Supply Chain Management3
ISA/STA 365Statistical Monitoring and Design of Experiments3
or MME 334 Quality Planning and Control
MGT 453/MGT 553Quality Management Systems3
Total Credit Hours13

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Management. Majors in the Departments of Information Systems and Analytics, Manufacturing and Mechanical Engineering, Mathematics and Statistics must take a minimum of nine hours from outside department of major.

STA 2 Applied Statistics

Provides a basic understanding of the statistical data analysis procedures of estimation and hypothesis testing and their use in data-based decision making. Based primarily on the “classical” assumptions of random sampling and normal distributions, data analysis applications range from one and two population problems to more complex problems of regression and design of experiments. The first course, chosen from three options, introduces additional statistical procedures that go beyond the “classical” assumptions. Considers examples from a variety of disciplines and life experiences and employs statistical software extensively.

STA 261Statistics3-4
or STA 301 Applied Statistics
STA 363Introduction to Statistical Modeling3
Select one of the following:3
Nonparametric Statistics
Statistical Monitoring and Design of Experiments
Survey Sampling in Business
Total Credit Hours9-10

Note: Not open to majors in the Departments of Mathematics and Statistics.

THE 1 Modern Theatre and Drama

Study of the influences, backgrounds, playwrights, and theatre artists that have brought about contemporary theatre production practice, style, and dramaturgy. The eclecticism of 20th century theatre reflects the shifting realities of science, culture, politics, and aesthetics in a way that mirrors our attempts to understand ourselves and our world. The objective is to reach an integrative knowledge of the connectedness of art and society to understand how in creating an image of our lives, in forging new realities, in exploring new forms and styles, theatre artists have helped define our response to the world and our experience.

Select one of the following:3
Introduction to Theatre: Drama and Analysis
Experiencing Theatre
Select two of the following:6
Topics in Intercultural Perspectives and Global Theatre and Performance
Topics in Dramatic Literature and Cultural Performance
The Musical in American Culture
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Theatre.

THE 2 London Theatre

This thematic is an exploration of the rich tradition and contemporary diversity of theatre in London and the historical, cultural and critical context from which they spring. After an introduction to the art and history of theatre completed in one of two Miami Plan courses at Miami University, students will travel to London for a three-week winter session intensive immersion in London theatre--attending performances, thinking critically about them as products of specific historical and cultural contexts, and learning about styles of dramatic expression particular to Britain’s theatrical present and past.

THE 101Introduction to Theatre: Drama and Analysis3
or THE 191 Experiencing Theatre
THE 494/THE 594London Theatre 13
Select one of the following:3
Topics in Intercultural Perspectives and Global Theatre and Performance 1
Special Techniques for the Actor 1
Special Topics in Theatre Design and Technology 1
Total Credit Hours9
1

 Can only be taken in summer in London; other sections of these courses offered on campus do not count toward the sequence.

WGS 1 Gender in Global Context

This sequence focuses on the analysis of the historical, cultural, socioeconomic, and political contexts of gender relations in various parts of the world. Such a global perspective will be predicated on an understanding of the different debates around gender, race, and class that the variety of transnational feminisms has created. Students will demonstrate the ability to apply the fundamental contexts comparing the ways in which gender is constructed and functions in different countries and regions of the world. Students will develop skills of increasing complexity ranging from gender analysis to cross-disciplinary research in international contexts.

WGS 201Introduction to Women's Studies3
Select two of the following:6
Women and Difference: Intersections of Race, Class, and Sexuality
Native American Women
Native American Women
Global Gender Politics
Topics in Women's History
Religion, Dress, and Status
Women, Gender and the Environment
Marriage Across Cultures
Indigenous Peoples and Their Sacred Lands
Black Feminist Theory
Cultural Politics of Gender and Sexuality in Asian/America
Brazilian Women through Literature and Film
WGS 410B or WGS 410E
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.

WGS 2 Scholarly Studies of Gender and Sexuality

The thematic sequence in Scholarly Studies of Gender and Sexuality provides an opportunity for investigating and analyzing the historical, social, legal, and cultural forces that shape experiences, expressions, and representations of non-normative genders and sexualities including, but not necessarily limited to Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgendered, Intersex and Queer individuals and communities. Students will receive a broad, interdisciplinary introduction to scholarship in GLBTIQ studies in the foundation course, then focus more specifically on a disciplinary or topical perspective in tier two, ultimately engaging with the philosophical and theoretical aspects of investigating sexuality and gender as meaning-making cultural and social systems.

WGS 202Introduction to GLBT Studies 13
Select one of the following:3
GLBTQ Literature
Sexualities and Film
Sociology of Gender
Sexualities
Mediated Sexualities: Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals, and Transgendered Persons and the Electronic Media 1
Select the following:
WGS/ENG 435Queer Theory3
Total Credit Hours9
1

Only one Foundation (MPF) course can count toward both a Foundation requirement and a Thematic Sequence.

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.

Thematic Sequences Available at Dolibois European Center in Luxembourg

For information, contact the Oxford Luxembourg Office, 218 MacMillan Hall, 513-529-5050.

LUX 3 European Culture and Society. (Offered during the semester programs and summer workshop)

This sequence permits students to draw on the variety of European-focused courses available at the Dolibois European Center to develop an in-depth understanding of the complexities of contemporary Europe. Emphasis is on an interdisciplinary perspective which links cultural phenomena and socio-political dynamics. Students must take at least one course from each of the three groupings for a total of at least nine credit hours. Students may include only one course from the department of their major in the sequence.