Department of Family Science and Social Work

For information, contact the Department of Family Science and Social Work, 101 McGuffey Hall or call 513-529-2323.

Miami University’s Department of Family Science and Social Work promotes a comprehensive understanding of the interconnected relationships between theory, research, and practice (e.g., prevention, intervention) by incorporating knowledge, values, and skills from the fields of social work, human development, and family science.

Our programs prepare students to ethically respond to the complex needs of individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities from a global, social justice orientation.

Department of Family Science and Social Work offers the following programs:

The Bachelor of Science in Social Work is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. In addition, the National Council on Family Relations verifies that Miami's Bachelors in Social Work meets all standards and criteria needed for students to receive provisional certification as a Family Life Educator. Upon graduating, students are eligible to apply for social work licensure and provisional certification as a Family Life Educator.

Child Life Specialist undergraduate and graduate certificates provide required coursework to meet the curricular qualifications for certification as a Certified Child Life Specialist through the Association of Child Life Professionals. After completing the child life specialist certificate, candidates must also complete a 600-hour child life internships and take the certification exam in order to be certified as a child life specialist.

FSW 177. Independent Studies. (0-6)

FSW 201. Introduction to Social Work and Family Life Education. (3)

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the current standing of the professions of social work and family science. Individuals and families will be discussed using multiple social work and family science theories that acknowledge larger social contexts. The course is framed through a social justice and human betterment perspective. Students will explore the core content areas of social work and the CFLE, the professionalization of social workers and family science, and current policies related to social welfare programs. Students will learn about employment in various sectors of society such as mental health settings, schools, hospitals, criminal justice, child welfare, etc. As an introductory course, the aim is to encourage critical thinking and an increased awareness of the historical and current impact of social policies on individuals, families, groups, organizations, communities, and global contexts.

FSW 206. Social Policies & Programs to Promote Social Justice. (3)

Have you ever wondered how social policies are created and how they influence social welfare programs? Do you know who represents you in local, state and national governments? In this course, you will learn about historical and current structures of social policies and services, and how policy impacts social programs. Using active and collaborative learning strategies, you will evaluate the values and decision-making processes that go into policy development and how they differentially affect people based on historical, social, racial, cultural, economic, organizational, environmental, and global factors. Special attention will be given to disenfranchised, oppressed, and impoverished populations. You will also gain skills in policy analysis and advocacy to advance human rights and social, racial, economic, and environmental justice! IC, IIC. PA-2A, PA-4A, SI-02.

FSW 207. Serving and Supporting Children, Youth, and Families I. (4)

Introductory analysis of relationships among the conditions, characteristics, and capacities of children, youth, and families (especially those labeled "at risk") and the institutional services and supports intended to improve their well-being. Emphasis placed upon question-finding in different contexts, especially the ways in which the knowledge we claim and the solutions we offer are dependent upon our analytical frames and language. Offered on regional campuses only.
Cross-listed with KNH 207.

FSW 221. Sexualities. (3)

Introduction to the study of human sexual behavior with particular attention paid to the issues of gender development; premarital, marital, and post-marital sexual patterns; birth control; sexual dysfunction; cross-cultural sexual patterns; and diverse sexual lifestyles. PA-4A.
Cross-listed with SOC 221 and WGS 221.

FSW 225. Family School and Community Connections. (3)

This course focuses on the theory and practice of joining families, communities, and schools to support student learning, development and success in education. Strategies to improve communication and collaboration are emphasized with a focus on family types, cultures, economic conditions, school systems, community services, political forces, advocacy groups, and other factors that impact children and their families. IC. PA-4B.
Cross-listed with TCE 225.

FSW 245. Children and Families: Ages Conception - 12. (3)

Students in this course will examine the developmental contexts and theoretical perspectives of working with children and families. They will conduct in-depth analyses of the complex relationships between school, community and family resources in an educational setting. IIC. PA-2A.

FSW 261. Diverse Family Systems Across the Life Cycle. (3)

Introduction to and survey of the diversity of family systems. Emphasizes the North American experience while drawing upon global understandings. Covers the nature of family systems and how these may vary by social class, ethnicity, urban-rural residence, and other aspects of sociocultural context. Stresses how family systems change across their life span, as well as how individuals experience different family systems in their life spans. IIC. PA-2A.

FSW 277. Independent Studies. (0-6)

FSW 283. Introduction to Child Care Administration. (3)

This course is intended for persons intending to work with young children and their families in a variety of child care settings and will focus on the development of knowledge and skills in understanding various aspects of child care administration and management. Offered on regional campuses only.

FSW 293. Field Placement: Infant/Toddler Setting. (3)

Course designed for students who are assuming teaching responsibilities for an extended period of time under guided supervision in an infant/toddler program. Offered on regional campuses only.
Prerequisites: FSW 382; C- in TCE 273 & TCE 274, EDP 201, & FSW 245.
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: TCE 246 and TCE 272.

FSW 294. Field Placement - Preschool Setting. (3)

Course designed for students who are assuming teaching responsibilities for an extended period of time under guided supervision in a preschool program. Offered on regional campuses only.
Prerequisites: C-or better in TCE 273 & 274, EDP 201, & FSW 245.
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: TCE 246 and TCE 272E.

FSW 295. Research and Evaluation Methods. (3)

This course covers the role of research in the social world and the interpretation and critical analysis of research reports and applications. The course provides the foundation to equip students to be consumers of published research and to engage in building knowledge to enhance practice and service delivery through the use of scientific methods, as well as to identify the strengths and weaknesses of those methods. This is done to support the education of social workers and other social scientists for use with and on behalf of at-risk populations. Special emphasis will be placed on the protection of human subjects, methods for involvement of at-risk and underserved populations in the research process, critical thinking, data analysis, and technological advances which support information gathering, processing, analysis and dissemination.

FSW 304. Professionalism and Ethics for Practice. (3)

This introductory practice course provides a foundation for students to develop and critically analyze the values, ethical codes, licensure regulations, and practice principles associated with social work and family life education professions. While formulating their professional identity as a social worker and family life educator, students will also have an opportunity to explore their personal values and beliefs systems, practice marketing themselves as future professionals, and cultivate interviewing and engagement skills. Opportunities to practice written and verbal professional communication strategies using various technological platforms are integrated throughout the course. ADVW. PA-1C.
Prerequisites or Co-requisites: FSW 201, FSW 206 and declared social work major.

FSW 306. Trauma Responsive Assessment and Intervention. (3)

This course prepares students for generalist practice with individuals and families by incorporating a trauma-responsive lens to understand the impacts adverse experiences have on neurobiological and psychosocial development on individuals and family systems. This course provides students opportunities to enhance their knowledge and skills to engage, assess, intervene and evaluate client progress in direct practice settings.
Prerequisites: FSW 201, FSW 206, and declared social work major.
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: FSW 304.

FSW 312. Human Behavior in the Social Environment. (3)

Examines diverse human behavior through an integration of various theoretical perspectives using a social systems approach. A social systems approach provides a framework to view individuals in the context of the family, groups, organizations, communities, and institutions. Integrates knowledge and develops a foundation necessary for social work practice and social work field experience.

FSW 318. Child Life Theory and Practice. (3)

Application of knowledge of child and adolescent development to educate, prepare, and support children and their families in healthcare settings and the changes in family dynamics related to illness they experience. This course is taught by a Certified Child Life Specialist and meets one of the requirements of the Child Life Council to become a Certified Child Life Specialist.

FSW 333. Writing For Helping Professions. (3)

The course focuses on developing ideas, pursuing knowledge, and conveying one’s thoughts through oral and written media in helping professions such as psychology, social work, and family science and in mastering skills needed in a variety of practices (e.g., clinical work, research, program evaluation, grant writing, case notes, treatment plans, assessments, and administration). The course emphasizes that strong writing skills with the ability to adapt writing to different tasks and audiences is critical for professional competency and career advancement. ADVW. PA-1C.

FSW 340. Internship. (0-20)

FSW 361. Couple Relationships: Diversity and Change. (3)

Investigation of intimate couple relationships in their many diverse forms. Focuses on social and psychological factors influencing development and maintenance of such couple relationships as dating, cohabitation, and marriage. General principles are discussed as well as factors that are more specific to certain age groups, relationship types, or sociocultural settings. IC. PA-4B.
Prerequisite: three hours of social science.
Cross-listed with WGS 361.

FSW 362. Family Poverty. (3)

Examines definitions, theories, causes and consequences of family poverty in the U.S. Identifies the extent and degree of U.S. poverty and demographic characteristics of those who are poor or likely to become poor. Consideration given to programs that reduce poverty and/or its negative effects, including those practiced in the past, those now practiced, and those that offer promise for improving the economic and social status of those who are poor. Costs and benefits of welfare and welfare reform and strategies for preventing poverty among future generations also discussed and evaluated. IC. PA-4B.
Cross-listed with CRE 362 and SOC 362.

FSW 363. Sociology of Families. (3)

Analysis of the impact of social change on family systems and patterns, structures, dynamics, and social policy, with emphasis on differences by social strata and culture.
Cross-listed with SOC 363.

FSW 365. Let's Talk about Sex: Families, Relationships, and Policy. (3)

FSW 365 addresses cultural, social, and systemic issues related to sexuality education, sexual behavior, and sexual identity. In this course, we will cover a comprehensive overview of the biological and social aspects of human sexuality, specifically directed at training for family life educators, social workers, and other professionals, but applicable to all people in their personal lives and relationships. We will continually reflect on how power, justice, and social change have specific influences on and relevance to sexuality and the sex education landscape broadly, as well as what you can do to advocate for policies and practices that are more in line with evidence-based best practices. You’ll participate in discussion, reflection, and analysis of how policies, both past and current, affect our access to comprehensive sexuality education as well as influence our interactions with and about others. The course methodology utilizes a variety of teaching strategies that are appropriate for different age groups, which will meet certification requirements for family life educators. PA-4B, SI-02.

FSW 377. Independent Studies. (0-6)

FSW 382. Infant and Toddler Caregiving and Supervision. (3)

For those who plan and provide care for infants and toddlers in families and in various types of child care settings. Concepts in care provided with activities to help students develop caregiving knowledge and skills. Offered on regional campuses only.

FSW 406/FSW 506. Group Theory and Practice. (3)

This course focuses on the application of a generalist, social systems framework for social work groups and community practice. A wide range of content, modalities, theories, and treatment approaches for effective group work and community practice are presented. Emphasis is placed on deepening social work practitioner group practice skills with various at-risk and vulnerable populations as well as content for understanding inclusive practice with organizations and communities. Students learn group and community inclusive practice content that identifies client issues, their problems, and their needs for collaborative service delivery. Course content also includes identifying, assessing, analyzing, documenting, and implementing empirically based group and community interventions; applying empirically-based group and community knowledge and technological advances, and providing leadership for supportive services that promote social and economic justice on behalf of client systems in relation to their broader environments.
Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in FSW 201 and FSW 206; social work major or social work graduate student status.
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: FSW 304.

FSW 411. Senior Field Experience I. (4)

Provides social work majors with the opportunity to integrate and apply liberal education foundation and generalist social work knowledge and skills gained in the classroom by practicing with various sized systems, including individuals, families, groups, agencies, communities, and institutions. EL.
Prerequisite: Completion of FSW 304, FSW 306, and FSW 406/FSW 506, and social work major status.
Co-requisite: FSW 412.

FSW 412. Senior Seminar in Social Work I. (2)

Provides opportunity to continue the integration social work courses with field experiences. Focuses on experiences and knowledge regarding macro-level systems, however, students are expected to integrate and apply generalist social work knowledge and skills with multi-level, diverse systems.
Prerequisites: FSW 306, FSW 406/FSW 506.
Co-requisite: FSW 411.

FSW 413. Senior Seminar in Social Work II. (2)

Provides opportunity to continue the integration of social work courses with field experiences. Focuses on experiences and knowledge regarding macro-level systems, however, students are expected to integrate and apply generalist social work knowledge and skills with multi-level, diverse systems.
Prerequisites: FSW 306, FSW 406/FSW 506.
Co-requisites: FSW 414.

FSW 414. Senior Field Experience II. (4)

Provides social work majors with the opportunity to integrate and apply liberal education foundation and generalist social work knowledge and skills gained in the classroom by practicing with various sized systems, including individuals, families, groups, agencies, communities, and institutions. EL.
Prerequisite: FSW 304, FSW 306, and FSW 406/FSW 506, and social work major status.
Co-requisite: FSW 413.

FSW 415/FSW 515. Culturally-Informed Practice. (3)

In this course, we explore how individuals and families experience, organize, and negotiate their membership in the full range of social categories. The intersectionality of power, race, class, gender and other identities will be examined as it relates to individuals, families, and social groups. Students will learn about the impact of personal biases and values when working with diverse constituencies.

FSW 418/FSW 518. Program Development and Evaluation. (3)

The purpose of this course is for students to learn how to conduct a needs assessment and develop a program based on the results of that assessment of families and/or communities. This class also teaches how to evaluate whether the program has met its measurable objectives, and how to prepare a grant proposal to fund the program. ADVW. PA-1C.
Prerequisites: FSW 295; Social work major or social work graduate student or permission of instructor.

FSW 435/FSW 535. Death Studies. (3)

Examines social processes involved in the meaning, management, and experience of death and dying. Analyzes death as it relates to social structure, patterns of social interactions, and human experience.
Prerequisite: SOC 151 or SOC 153; SOC/SJS 165; or GTY 154; or FSW 261.
Cross-listed with SOC.

FSW 442/FSW 542. Family Resource Management: Education and Advocacy. (3)

In this course students will engage in critical analysis while exploring individual- and family-level goal setting and decision-making with regard to the identification, development, acquisition, and allocation of resources (e.g., time, energy, friends, neighbors, natural environment, money, material assets, and space). The processes by which families manage their resources are complex and often influenced by many factors including relationships with current and past family members; the political, economic, and social environment; interactions with available resources in their community; and patterns of interaction within and between family members and others outside the family. This course will also discuss advocacy strategies for promoting environmental and economic justice.
Prerequisite: FSW 261 or FSW 225 or TCE 225 or FSW 242.

FSW 445/FSW 545. Therapeutic Play for Child Life Specialists. (3)

This course introduces theories of play and outlines the relationship between theories of human development and theories of play. Students pursuing certification as child life specialists will examine elements of play, benefits of play, and various therapeutic play modalities for the clinical setting as a force for healing and enhancing the well-being of children and families. Opportunities to develop and practice therapeutic play skills will be provided.
Prerequisite: FSW 245.

FSW 450/FSW 550. Special Problems. (1-4; maximum 8)

Various topics offered across semesters, professors, or sections.
Prerequisite: upperclass or graduate standing in family science and social work.

FSW 451/FSW 551. Interpersonal Violence. (3)

This course examines and evaluates how interpersonal violence impacts individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Using ecological/feminist framework, emphasis is placed on the examination of violence within varied contexts. Topics and class discussions will focus heavily on concepts related to prevention and intervention. Student will use critical thinking, engage with other learners, and complete personal reflections. SC.
Cross-listed with SOC 451 and WGS 451/WGS 551/551.

FSW 455/FSW 555. Child Abuse & Neglect: Assessment & Child Safety. (3)

This course teaches students about child protective services, with a focus on assessment of child safety and well-being. Students learn about processes and requirements for mandated reporting of suspected child abuse and neglect, definition of terminology, family-centered approaches to fact gathering and engagement, culturally diverse child rearing practices, professional ethics and values related to working with families and children, and development of safety plans. This is the first course in the Child Welfare series, serving as a foundation in preparing students for a career in child protective services as social work professionals, but is open to students in related majors (e.g., education, nursing, criminal justice) who are interested in learning more about these concepts.5.
Prerequisite: Senior status or graduate student status, or permission of instructor, minimum GPA of 2.

FSW 462/FSW 562. Family Policy and Law. (3)

Examines family policies related to U.S. families' well-being using an ecological framework. Considers the impact of family policies/laws at state and federal levels including: policy development, implementation, and evaluation; and roles of professionals in building/influencing family policy. SC.
Prerequisite: FSW 295 or SOC 262.

FSW 465/FSW 565. Child Abuse & Neglect: Permanency and Well-being. (3)

This course teaches students about child protective services, with a focus on assessment of child safety, permanency, and well-being. This course will focus on the investigation of child maltreatment allegations, service planning, and the development of case plans. This is the second course in the Child Welfare series, serving as a foundation in preparing students for a career in child protective services as social work professionals, but is open to students in related majors (e.g., education, nursing, criminal justice) who are interested in learning more about these concepts.5.
Prerequisites: Senior status or graduate student status, or permission of instructor, minimum GPA of 2.

FSW 466/FSW 566. Interpersonal Perspectives on Adulthood and Aging. (3)

Examination of the central importance of close relationships in adulthood. Topics include long-term intimate relationships, sexuality/sexual behavior, dating, singlehood, divorce, widowhood, parent-adult child relationships, siblings' grandparenthood, friendships, retirement/financial concerns, caregiving, and policy issues impacting close relationships in adulthood.

FSW 475/FSW 575. Family Theories. (3)

Analysis of selected theories of the family. Emphasis placed on conceptual knowledge, understanding of the importance of family theories and in-depth analysis of several theoretical frameworks, such as family process, conflict, and symbolic interaction.
Prerequisite: six hours of family sciences courses and upperclass or graduate standing, or by permission of instructor.

FSW 477. Independent Studies. (0-6)

FSW 481/FSW 581. Adolescent Development in Diverse Families: Ages 13-25. (3)

Students will engage in an interdisciplinary examination of the fields of adolescent development and emerging adulthood from contextual and cross-cultural perspectives. The racial, ethnic, and cultural diversity of adolescents is considered while studying persons 13-25 years of age within family and social systems. Topics include identity development, peer relations, sexuality, gender norms, physical and emotional development, community resources and engagement, intimate relationships, parent-adolescent relationships, and other family and social influences during adolescence and emerging adulthood.

FSW 491/FSW 591. Seminar in Family and Child Studies. (1-4; maximum 4)

Various topics offered across semesters, professors, or sections.
Prerequisite: upperclass or graduate standing in family science and social work.

FSW 564. Child Abuse & Neglect: Permanency and Well-being. (3)

This course teaches students about child protective services, with a focus on assessment of child safety, permanency, and well-being. This course will focus on the investigation of child maltreatment allegations, service planning, and the development of case plans. This is the second course in the Child Welfare series, serving as a foundation in preparing students for a career in child protective services as social work professionals, but is open to students in related majors (e.g., education, nursing, criminal justice) who are interested in learning more about these concepts.5.
Prerequisites: Senior status or graduate student status, or permission of instructor, minimum GPA of 2.

FSW 600. Independent Reading. (1-4; maximum 4)

Planned reading in any field in family studies with guidance of a department faculty member.
Prerequisite: advanced standing, nine semester hours in family studies and social work, and approval of the plan by department chair.

FSW 602. Diverse Families in Context. (3)

This course will provide students an opportunity to examine how changing social and economic policies and laws have had an impact on diverse families, primarily in the U.S. Students will assess how macro-level forces, including family privilege in policymaking, have played out in these families’ everyday lives and have advantaged some family forms over others. As explicit and implicit family policy topics (e.g., marriage, immigration, health care) are explored, the role that personal and cultural values play in the policymaking process will be addressed. Further, learning how to influence family policymaking and to effect systems-level change will be a primary focus of the course. The instructor’s area of expertise will determine which types of families (e.g., LGBTQ families, Black families, families experiencing illness) will be centered during any given semester.

FSW 611. Social Welfare Policy I. (3)

Social Welfare Policy I provides an overview of social welfare and social work as a profession. An overview of U.S. Social welfare services are provided in the context of social work values and ethics. This course includes a critical analysis of historical and current interactions of social welfare policies, programs, and services with diverse recipient populations.
Prerequisite: admission to the MASW Program.

FSW 613. Social Work Ethics: Social Work Ethics, Professionalism and Self Care. (3)

This course introduces graduate social work majors to the ethical practice of social work from a generalist perspective, including professional conduct and self care awareness and skills. Students will increase their understanding of the history and evolution of values and ethics in the social work profession, and develop skills in applying relevant ethical concepts and theories to social work practice. Students will also increase their ability to recognize ethical issues and to apply ethical decision-making frameworks and protocols through enhanced use of critical thinking skills. Lastly, students will learn self care awareness and skills needed to decrease incidents of vicarious trauma in social work settings.
Prerequisite: admitted to MASW Program.

FSW 616. Graduate Social Work Research I. (3)

Students will learn basic skills of quantitative and qualitative social research methodology and techniques of gathering, analyzing and interpreting data. Students will evaluate research reports for relevance to practice with at-risk and underserved populations. Students will develop an initial research or evaluation design for social work practice.

FSW 617. Human Behavior in the Social Environment I. (3)

The course employs a social systems approach as the primary foundation for viewing families, groups, organizations, communities and social institutions. The course will utilize theories about human behavior to develop the foundation needed to learn effective social work practice.
Prerequisite: admission to the MSW Program.

FSW 619. Evaluating Clients & Programs. (4)

In planning research and evaluation, attention must be focused on specifying the purpose of the research, identifying the variables, developing the instruments, human subjects protection, and research implementation. The aim of the course is to provide the student with a basic competence in the scientific method of investigation. In addition to understanding how to discover knowledge, students will become critical consumers of single subject design, program evaluation and integrators of social work knowledge from different areas of social work curriculum. Further, students will learn basic skills of quantitative social research methodology and statistical analysis.
Prerequisite: admission to MSW program, or by instructor permission.

FSW 621. Social Work Practice I. (3)

Social work practice I is designed to help students develop an understanding of the knowledge base and values of social work practice; acquire basic skills through the use of role-playing and simulated interviewing process. Specific attention is given to micro levels systems, emphasizing the interactions of micro systems with mezzo and macro level systems.
Prerequisite: admission to the MSW program.

FSW 622. Social Work Practice II. (3)

This course will focus on the continued application of theories, concepts and principles in direct social work practice with groups, organizations, and communities. Focus on deepening skills with each of these populations and knowledge about social work practice is presented. A particular focus is on empowerment, social and economic justice, groups, and communities.
Prerequisite: FSW 621, admission to the MSW program.

FSW 640. Internship. (0-12; maximum 12)

FSW 641. Advanced Social Work Practice. (3)

This course provides the knowledge, skills, and values needed for advanced generalist social workers to engage, assess, intervene, and evaluate direct practice with individuals and families. This course will discuss clinical interventions with individuals and families across the lifespan.
Prerequisite: admission into the MSW Program.

FSW 642. Advanced Policy Analysis for Social Work. (3)

This course focuses on U.S. social welfare policies and programs. Particular attention is paid to social welfare policy analysis, the nature of social welfare system trends, and their impact on individuals and families across the lifespan. Previous undergraduate course work in social welfare policy is strongly suggested.
Prerequisites: FSW 621, FSW 622, MSW program admission or permission of instructor.

FSW 645. Concentration Focus Area Older Adults: Practice. (3)

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of advanced generalist practice with older adults. A life course perspective that incorporates cultural, economic, historical and structural contexts that provides the framework for examining aging-related issues, particularly in regards to the impact on the quality of life of older adults. Topics to be explored include cross-cultural issues, health and mental health, social theories of aging, and resilience in older persons of color, among others.

FSW 646. Older Adults: Macro Practice. (3)

This course provides the knowledge, skills, and values needed for advanced generalist social workers to engage, assess, intervene, and evaluate policy practice with older adults. This course will include policies and programs that specifically target positive outcomes for older adults.

FSW 664. Social Work Field Education I. (3)

The seminar is specifically designed to integrate the Field Education I experience with coursework, and is offered to students admitted to the MSW Traditional Program.

FSW 668. Treatment of Substance Use Disorders. (3)

This course reviews the diagnostic criteria and various treatment options for individuals and families afflicted with Substance Use Disorders. Embedding principles associated with addiction neuroscience, addiction theories, and trauma-informed care, this course provides students with the knowledge and skills needed to provide clinical interventions associated with addiction and co-occurring mental health diagnoses. Evidence-based approaches are introduced throughout the course to support students’ learning and development when recommending treatment options that incorporate the impacts and relationships between substance abuse and the socio-environmental factors of vulnerability within diverse populations.

FSW 677. Independent Studies. (0-6)

FSW 688. Clinical Interventions in Social Work. (3)

This course is designed to give advanced generalist social workers an opportunity to examine, compare and evaluate a variety of evidenced-based clinical approaches and interventions used in social work practice. Students will gain knowledge and understanding of the main tenets of each therapeutic approaches and/or intervention and will be encouraged to use critical thinking and analytical skills to compare and differentiate these various approaches. The course will focus on evidenced-based clinical interventions used for depressive, anxious, trauma, personality, and other related disorders.

FSW 700. Masters Thesis. (1-14)

Prerequisite: approval of faculty member.

FSW 716. Graduate Social Work Research II. (3)

This second research course concerns the data analysis component of social science research and program evaluation. The course covers the procedures for the rigorous, valid, reliable, and credible collection and analysis of quantitative and qualitative data to arrive at decisions that improve interventions and contribute to knowledge. Students will continue to develop the research design for their culminating research project.

FSW 717. Social Work Capstone. (3)

Students design and implement a culminating project using qualitative and/or quantitative research methods. Students will collect data and conduct data analyses, and then make recommendations based on those findings to inform agency practice and/or policy decisions.
Prerequisite: FSW 716 or FSW 619, and admission to the MSW program.

FSW 723. Social Work Assessment and the DSM. (3)

This course covers the accurate application of DSM and other clinical assessment tools, an understanding of social deviance, and the application of clinical treatment models, such as cognitive, behavioral, strengths based, psychodynamic, psychoeducational and group approaches. Content is also designed to build student knowledge and competency in assessment and intervention with diverse populations.

FSW 724. Social Work Agency Administration. (3)

This course teaches advanced generalist social work direct practice skills with communities and organizations. Content will include topics related to agency administration (e.g., budgets, supervision), community organization, advocacy, and legislative policy change. Content will also include skills to write grants to support funding of social service organizations. Prerequisites or Corequisites: FSW 716 or FSW 619.

FSW 765. Social Work Field Education II. (3)

The seminar is specifically designed to integrate the Field Education II experiences with coursework, and is required of all students in the graduate program in Social Work.

FSW 766. Social Work Field Education III. (3)

The seminar is specifically designed to integrate the Field Education III experiences with coursework, and is required of all students in the MSW program.
Prerequisite: admission to the MSW Program.