Academic Planning

Educational Decisions

Choosing a Major and Making Career Choices

This is never a simple decision. Many students change majors at least once.

Although you do not need to choose a specific major, you will need to choose a division when you register. If you are undecided, you are assigned to the College of Arts and Science for advising purposes. In most cases, if you use your first year to take courses that fulfill the Global Miami Plan and divisional requirements, you can still complete a major program with no delay. However, to complete some majors in a four-year time period, you must begin them as a first year student.

To make academic and career choices, you need to consider your interests and abilities. By now you probably have a strong sense of your academic strengths and weaknesses. Your interests, however, are still developing and, like more specific skills, depend on exposure to various activities and ideas.

Career Services, located at 200 Hoyt Hall on Western Campus, can also help you understand how majors connect to various careers. The Career Services website www.MiamiOH.edu/careers/ provides useful career information and links to dozens of other career-related sites where you can explore different jobs by major.  Career Services also offers one-on-one mentoring, workshops to help you explore careers, and standardized career assessments. Each of these opportunities can help you learn about your interests, abilities, and values and to relate them to your academic and career choices.

The Career Development and the College Student Course (EDL 100), provides opportunities to learn more about selecting a career. It is offered to first- and second-year students.

When you are ready to start your job or internship search, Career Services provides resume help, job or internship search strategies, mock interviewing, and can provide information about specific careers or internships. Over 300 employers visit campus annually for on-campus interviews. To learn more about the employers that visit campus, and to make yourself eligible for the interviews and advising appointments, sign up for a Miami CAREERlink account using your banner ID: https://miamiu-csm.symplicity.com/students/.

Finally, don't forget to talk with your assigned academic advisors in the department or division of your primary major; your advisor can offer you informed advice on curriculum, career opportunities within fields, and opportunities for advanced study.

Programs with Special Admission Requirements

Some programs have special requirements that call for careful planning. For example, you must be admitted to most majors in the College of Creative Arts or the Department of Nursing (Hamilton & Middletown campuses only) before you declare the major. Also, teacher licensure programs and science and technical major programs require specific courses that are usually taken in order.

It is important to check your major's requirements. Programs are listed in each division's chapter.

At present, majors with limited or restricted entry include nursing, social work, special education, speech pathology and audiology, all licensure programs in the Department of Teacher Education, all programs in the Farmer School of Business, and most majors in the College of Creative Arts.

Academic Advising

Academic advisors are available to help you understand academic requirements and to address your concerns. They can provide you with information and resources that will help you make decisions about your class schedule, course of study, and future opportunities.

Students will be assigned a faculty or professional academic advisor within the department or division of their major prior to their first semester at Miami. When students change majors, their academic advisor will likely change. Students who have not declared a major will be advised by a specifically trained academic advisor within the University Studies program.

Residence hall staff members are trained professionals who will assist first- and second-year students with addressing transitional issues, understanding university tools and resources, making appropriate referrals, and helping them to integrate their academic, personal, and co-curricular life.

Mid-Semester Grade Reports

By the end of the eighth week of classes in the fall and spring semesters, instructors are required to submit midterm grades for all undergraduate students who have 45 or fewer earned credits at Miami University. Instructors are encouraged to submit midterm grades for all other students. This requirement applies to all full-term classes and twelve-week "Q" sprint classes during the fall and spring semesters. Midterm grades are not required during other fall and spring semester sprint classes or for any winter and summer terms. Midterm grades are available to students online through BannerWeb. Midterm grades provide students the opportunity to assess their academic performance while there is still time to improve before receiving official grades. Midterm grades are not recorded on student's academic records. Academic advisors also have access to students' midterm grades, and they will meet with all students who are struggling to discuss strategies for improving academic performance.

Academic Support

Bernard B. Rinella, Jr. Learning Center

14 Campus Avenue Building, 513-529-8741
www.MiamiOH.edu/learning

Students experiencing academic difficulty can seek assistance at the Rinella Learning Center. One-to-one and small group tutoring is available; tutoring is geared to develop self-confidence and independence. Peer tutors reinforce course material and help students to develop strategies to learn class material, prepare for homework, and take exams. Tutoring is free of charge. Requests for tutoring can be made on-line at www.MiamiOH.edu/tutoring. Learning specialists are also available for individual consultations.

In addition to the Tutorial Assistance Program, the Center is the umbrella for a number of programs and services that includes the office of Learning Disabilities Services which provides support for students with LD and ADHD; the Scholastic Enhancement Program for specially admitted students; Supplemental Instruction and Academic Coaching. The Center also coordinates support for students on academic warning, probation or returning from suspension or dismissal.

Student Disability Services (SDS)

19 Campus Avenue Building, 513-529-1541 (TTY accessible)
www.MiamiOH.edu/ODR

Student Disability Services (SDS) provides services and mandated accommodations for students with disabilities to ensure equal access to inclusive education and university life at Miami University. SDS coordinates accommodations through various campus, state, and national partners to provide services including, but not limited to, alternative formats for textbooks, orientation mobility training, campus transportation, sign language interpreters, CART services, modified housing, testing accommodations, advance registration, and advocacy.

Instructors' Office Hours

Most instructors have regularly scheduled office hours to meet with students. These are usually posted outside their office doors and on the course syllabus. To make an appointment for another time, contact the instructor or department secretary.

Advanced Placement Program (AP)

The State of Ohio, working with public institutions of higher education, has initiated policies to facilitate the ease of transition from high school to college, as well as between and among Ohio’s public colleges and universities.

Beginning in the Fall term 2009:

  1. Students obtaining an Advanced Placement (AP) exam score of 3 or above will be awarded the aligned course(s) and credits for the AP exam area(s) successfully completed.
  2. General Education courses and credits received will be applied towards graduation and will satisfy a general education requirement if the course(s) to which the AP area is equivalent fulfill a requirement.
  3. If an equivalent course is not available for the AP exam area completed, elective or area credit will be awarded in the appropriate academic discipline and will be applied towards graduation where such elective credit options exist within the academic major.
  4. Additional courses or credits may be available when a score of 4 or 5 is obtained. Award of credit for higher score values varies depending on the institution and academic discipline.

In academic disciplines containing highly dependent sequences (Sciences, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics -STEM), students are strongly advised to confer with the college/university advising staff to ensure they have the appropriate foundation to be successful in advanced coursework within the sequence.

AP Subject AP Score Course Number Hours Awarded
AP CapstoneSeminarUNV 1713
ResearchUNV 1723
Art History3ART 1883
4 or 5ART 187, ART 1886
Biology3, 4, or 5BIO 116/MBI 1164 (for score of 3: students advised to take course at college level, if biology major)
Calculus AB3, 4, or 5MTH 1515 (for score of 3: students advised to take course at college level if going to Calculus II)
Calculus BC3, 4, or 5MTH 151, MTH 2519
Chemistry3CHM 111, CHM 111L4
4CHM 141, CHM 1445
5CHM 141, CHM 142, CHM 144, CHM 14510
Chinese Language and Culture3CHI 101, CHI 1028
4CHI 101, CHI 102, CHI 20111
5CHI 101, CHI 102, CHI 201, CHI 20214
Computer Science A3 or 4CSE 1743
5CSE 174, CSE 2716
Computer Science Principles3, 4, or 5CSE 1513
Macroeconomics3, 4, or 5ECO 2023
Microeconomics3, 4, or 5ECO 2013
English Language3, 4, or 5ENG 1113
English Literature3-4ENG 1113
5ENG 111, ENG 1226
Student takes both exams:
English Language and English LiteratureAny combination of 3 and 4ENG 1113
Any score of 5 with any other scoreENG 111, ENG 1226
Environmental Science3, 4, or 5BIO 1213
European History3, 4, or 5HST 1223
French Language3FRE 101, FRE 1028
4FRE 101, FRE 102, FRE 20111
5FRE 101, FRE 102, FRE 201, FRE 20214
French Literature3FRE 101, FRE 102, FRE 20111
4 or 5FRE 101, FRE 102, FRE 201, FRE 20214
German Language3GER 101, GER 1028
4GER 101, GER 102, GER 20111
5GER 101, GER 102, GER 201, GER 20214
Comp Government & Politics3, 4, or 5POL 2213
U.S. Government & Politics3, 4, or 5POL 2413
Human Geography3, 4 or 5GEO 1013
Italian Language & Culture3ITL 101, ITL 1028
4ITL 101, ITL 102, ITL 20111
5ITL 101, ITL 102, ITL 201, ITL 20214
Japanese Language and Culture3JPN 101, JPN 1028
4JPN 101, JPN 102, JPN 20111
5JPN 101, JPN 102, JPN 201, JPN 20214
Latin3LAT 101, LAT 1028
4 or 5LAT 101, LAT 102, LAT 201, LAT 20214
Music Theory3MUS 1013
4 or 5MUS 101, MUS 1514
Physics 13, 4 or 5PHY 1614
Physics 23, 4 or 5PHY 1624
Physics B3, 4 or 5PHY 161, PHY 1628
Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism3, 4 or 5PHY 1925
Physics C: Mechanics3, 4 or 5PHY 1915
Psychology3, 4 or 5PSY 1113
Spanish language3SPN 101, SPN 1028
4 or 5SPN 101, SPN 102, SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 31117
Spanish Literature3SPN 101, SPN 102, SPN 20111
4 or 5SPN 101, SPN 102, SPN 201, SPN 202, SPN 31117
Statistics3, 4 or 5STA 2614
Studio Art: Drawing3, 4 or 5ART 1213
Studio Art: 2D Design3, 4 or 5ART 1113
Studio Art: 3D Design3, 4 or 5ART 1713
U.S. History3, 4 or 5HST 111, HST 1126
World History3, 4 or 5HST 197, HST 1986

College Level Examination Program (CLEP)

Contact Miami Hamilton Office of Academic Advising (204 Rentschler Hall, 513-785-3129) for information about CLEP.

Credit is awarded for satisfactory scores on some CLEP Subject Examinations. Tests are scored by the Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey. Because there is a fee for each test (see the Fees and Expenses section), we encourage you to take them only if you have had the equivalent of a college course in the subject area.

Miami's Hamilton campus operates an open CLEP testing center, which means tests are offered to university students as well as to members of the community who are not enrolled at Miami University. Miami's Middletown and Oxford campuses do not currently offer CLEP testing. The CLEP exam can be taken at any testing site and the score reported to Miami University.

Ohio Department of Higher Education, working with public institutions of higher education, has initiated policies and procedures to recognize students’ prior learning through College Board College-Level Examination Program (CLEP).

Beginning in Summer 2016, college credit is guaranteed for students as follows:

  1. Students who achieve a College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) test score of 50 or higher will be awarded the course(s) and credits for the CLEP exam area(s) successfully completed based upon the Course Alignment Recommendations.
  2. General Education courses and credits received will be applied towards graduation and will satisfy a general education requirement if the course(s) to which the CLEP area is equivalent fulfills a requirement.
  3. If an equivalent course is not available for the CLEP exam area completed, elective or area credit will be awarded in the appropriate academic discipline and will be applied towards graduation where such elective credit options exist within the academic major.
  4. Additional courses or credits may be available when a score of greater than 50 is obtained. Award of credit for higher score values varies depending on the institution and academic discipline.

In academic disciplines containing highly dependent sequences (Sciences, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics – STEM) students are strongly advised to confer with the college/university advising staff to ensure they have the appropriate foundation to be successful in advanced coursework within the sequence.

American Government: credit for POL 241 for score of 55.

Biology: credit for BIO 115 or BIO 116 for score of 65.

Calculus: credit for MTH 151 for score of 55.

College French, Levels I and II: credit for FRE 201, FRE 202 for score of 50.

College Level Spanish Language: credit for SPN 101, SPN 102 for score of 50; credit for SPN 201, SPN 202 for score of 63; credit for SPN 311 for score of 75.

Financial Accounting: credit for CMR 101 for a score of 50.

General Chemistry: credit for CHM 141, CHM 142, CHM 144, CHM 145 for score of 55.

German I: credit for GER 101 and GER 102 for score of 50.

German II: credit for GER 201 and GER 202 for score of 65.

Human Growth and Development: credit for PSY 231 for a score of 63.

Information Systems: credit for CMR 284 for score of 50.

Introduction to Business Law: credit for CMR 108 for score of 50.

Introduction to Educational Psychology: credit for EDP 101 for score of 50.

Introductory Psychology: credit for PSY 111 for score of 54.

Introductory Sociology: credit for SOC 153 for score of 56.

Macroeconomics: credit for ECO 202  for score of 62 or higher.

Microeconomics: credit for ECO 201 for score of 62 or higher.

Principles of Management: credit for  CMR 111 for score of 50.

Principles of Marketing: credit for CMR 105 for score of 50.

International Baccalaureate Program (IB)

Miami awards credit to IB diploma graduates for higher level subjects passed at a satisfactory level (minimum scores vary 5 to 7 by subject area). Standard levels are not awarded credit. Departments make the final determinations on credit.

Anthropology (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for ATH 175 and ATH 231.

Biology (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for BIO 116.

Business & Management (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for MGT 111.

Chemistry (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for CHM 141, CHM 142 and CHM 144, CHM 145 .

Chinese (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for CHI 101 and CHI 102.

Computer Science (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for CSE 151and CSE 163.

Design Technology (acceptable score of 5 or better)
Credit for ENT 137 and ENT 135.

Economics (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for ECO 201 and ECO 202.

English A (acceptable score 6 or better)
Credit for ENG 111.

English B (no credit awarded).

French (acceptable score 5)
Credit for FRE 202.

French (acceptable score of 6 or 7)
Credit for FRE 202 and FRE 341.

Geography (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for GEO 121 and GEO 201.

German B (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for GER 101 and GER 102.

Global Politics (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for POL 271.

History of Africa (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for HST 224 and HST 225.

History of the Americas (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for HST 111 and HST 112.

History of Asia and Oceana (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for HST 324 and HST 353.

History of Europe and the Islamic World (acceptable score of 5 or better)
Credit for HST 241 and HST 246.

History of Europe and the Middle East (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for HST 122 and HST 242.

Italian (acceptable score of 5 or better)
Credit for ITL 202.

Latin (acceptable score 6 or 7)
Credit for LAT 201.

Mathematics (acceptable score 6 or better)
Credit for MTH 151.

Music (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for MUS 101 and MUS 151.

Music Composition (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for MUS 144Z.

Music History (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credits to be evaluated by department.

Philosophy (acceptable score 6 or better)
Credit for PHL 105.

Physics (acceptable score 6 or better)
Credit for PHY 191 and PHY 192.

Psychology (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for PSY 111.

Russian B (acceptable score 5)
Credit for RUS 101 and RUS 102.

Spanish A (acceptable score 5)
Credit for SPN 101 and SPN 102.

Spanish A (acceptable score 6 or better)
Credit for SPN 101, SPN 102 , and SPN 201.

Spanish B (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for SPN 101 and SPN 102.

Spanish B (acceptable score 6 or better)
Credit for SPN 101, SPN 102 and SPN 201.

Theatre Arts (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for THE 131, THE 191, and THE 200.

Department Proficiency Examinations

These exams may be offered each semester. Each department in which tests are offered administers its own test, and credit applies toward graduation. You may take a proficiency examination during any semester or term in which you are enrolled. Fees are charged per credit hour after the first hour if the examination is passed. See the Fees and Expenses chapter for test charges.

To be approved for a proficiency examination, you must satisfy the department that you have a reasonable chance of passing it. Normally, these examinations are for courses below the 300 level, but they may be given for advanced courses with approvals of the department chair and the dean of the division in which the course is offered.

You may obtain credit or advanced placement, or both, by examinations in areas in which you have had adequate preparation. Credit earned is traditional credit and is not counted in the admissible 32 semester hours of nontraditional credit. No grades are awarded for proficiency examinations.

Business Technology: offered for CMR 181, CMR 224, CMR 282.

Computer Science: two exams offered in CSE 174 and CSE 271.

English: submit a writing portfolio to the Composition Program in the department in the summer before your enrollment. For details about eligibility, requirements and deadlines refer to the Composition Program website at http://www.units.MiamiOH.edu/portfolio/.

Information Technology: offered for CIT 154, CIT 157, CIT 158, and CIT 214.

Mathematics: offered in MTH 151, MTH 222, MTH 251. Contact the MTH department office for details; a group proficiency exam in MTH 151 is usually given during the first week of the fall semester.

Music: offered in MUS 151, MUS 152, MUS 251, MUS 252.

Placement Guides

Designed to help you choose your first course in the fields below, these guides describe the background necessary to enter courses at a certain level.

If you find that you have chosen a course that is too difficult, you can drop it (before the deadline to drop, listed in the Academic Calendar at MiamiOH.edu/OneStop) and begin with an easier course in a later semester.

Chemistry

CHM 111 and CHM 111L: for non-science majors; no previous chemistry is necessary; CHM 111 and CHM 111L fulfill the MPF natural science requirement and laboratory requirement.

CHM 141, CHM 141R, CHM 142, CHM 144, CHM 145: lectures and laboratories for students preparing for careers in health professions and sciences, engineering, or science teaching. See note below about math placement scores.

CHM 141 or CHM 141H, and CHM 142H or CHM 142M: lectures for students majoring in chemistry or biochemistry. CHM 144M or CHM 144H and CHM 145M or CHM 145H: laboratories students majoring in chemistry or biochemistry majors. See note below about math placement scores.

Certain math placement scores are required for placement into any CHM 14x courses.

  • With a score of 12 or higher you must enroll in orCHM 141H.

  • With a score of 8-11 you must enroll inCHM 141R(4 credit hours; 3 lecture, 1 recitation).

  • If your placement test score is 7 or lower you must complete a math course before enrolling in the CHM 14x series. See an advisor to choose an appropriate math course.

CHM 147: introductory seminar strongly recommended for all chemistry and biochemistry majors; one credit hour with credit/no credit grading.

Foreign Language

Placement is based on:

  1. high school preparation (typically, one year of high school equates to one college semester), and
  2. results of placement testing administered by Miami University.

You cannot take a foreign language course for credit at a lower level than you are prepared for. After being placed, you cannot skip a course in the sequence leading to 202.

If you intend to continue studying the same foreign language as you did in high school, you must take a placement exam for that language before you are able to enroll in a college level course. Placement exams should be taken by first-year students online prior to Summer Orientation; transfer students take them prior to transfer student advising in the summer. Continuing students wishing to enter a language sequence should take the placement exam and then seek advising before enrolling in a course.

Placement exams for Chinese, French, German, and Spanish are available online and access to the results is immediate and will be used for placement and advising.   An exam for Latin is available online, however, the results are not immediate as it requires to be scored by a faculty member and the results sent to you; please plan accordingly.  Guidance for placement into our remaining languages (Arabic, Hebrew, Italian, Korean, Japanese, or Portuguese) is available online via the Interactive Language Resource Center or by consulting with a language advisor.

Please take the exam seriously as it may have an impact on your future course selections.  Academic credit is not awarded as a result of any foreign language placement test.

101 LEVEL: for those beginning a new language or whose placement exam scores indicate they are not prepared to enter 102.

102 LEVEL: for those who have successfully completed 101. Also for those whose placement exam scores indicate they are not prepared to enter the second-year level.

111 in German: review course for those whose placement exam scores indicate they are not prepared to enter second-year level. After completing 111, students enter 201.

111 in Spanish: intensive first-year course for those whose placement exam scores indicate they are not prepared to enter second-year level. After completing 111, students enter 201.

121 LEVEL: intensive review course offered in Latin for those whose placement exam scores indicate they are not prepared to enter second-year level. After completing 121, students enter 202.

201 LEVEL: for those who have successfully completed 102, SPN 111, or equivalent, or achieved an appropriate placement exam score.

202 LEVEL: for those who have successfully completed 121, 201, or equivalent, or achieved an appropriate placement exam score; this course fulfills the language requirement for the College of Arts and Science (CAS-A).

203 LEVEL:  offered in Spanish, for those who have successfully completed SPN 201 or achieved an appropriate placement exam score; designed as an alternative to SPN 202 for those interested in the health care field.  Credit not given for both 202 and 203.  This course fulfills the language requirement for the College of Arts and Science (CAS-A).

211 LEVEL:  intensive second-year course for those who successfully completed SPN 102 or 111, or achieved an appropriate placement exam score.  This course fulfills the language requirement for the College of Arts and Science (CAS-A).

301 LEVEL AND ABOVE: for those who have successfully completed 202 or equivalent, or achieved an appropriate placement exam score. Any foreign language course at 300 level or above fulfills the language requirement for the College of Arts and Science (CAS-A), not including courses in translation.

Physics

All courses listed here can be used to fulfill the natural science section of the Miami Plan.

PHY 101, PHY 111, PHY 118, PHY 121, PHY 131, PHY 141: general physics course. PHY 103 has a prerequisite; see course descriptions.

PHY 161, PHY 162: physics sequence for students who have had mathematics courses that include trigonometry. MTH 151 or equivalent is strongly encouraged but not required as a prerequisite. PHY 161 is a prerequisite to PHY 162.

PHY 191, PHY 192: physics sequence recommended for science and engineering students who have taken or are concurrently enrolled in a calculus course. PHY 191 is  a prerequisite for PHY 192.

Algebra and Trigonometry

(See Mathematics and Statistics at the end of this chapter.)

MTH 102: not usually taken by business students. Algebra preparation for MTH 123. Students with no trigonometry background should consider following MTH 102 with MTH 104 despite losing duplicated credits.

MTH 104: covers intermediate algebra and precalculus in one semester. Next course is MTH 151.

MTH 123: preparation for MTH 151. Intended for students with three years of college preparatory mathematics including some trigonometry.

Calculus

(See Mathematics and Statistics at the end of this chapter.)

MTH 151: for students who have had little or no high school calculus. This is the first semester in calculus sequence MTH 151, MTH 251, MTH 252.

MTH 249: primarily for students who have AP credit for Calculus I (limited to freshmen). Reviews concepts of limit, derivative, and integrals from Calculus I, then covers same content asMTH 251. This is the first semester of calculus sequence MTH 249, MTH 252 that covers same topics as MTH 151, MTH 251, MTH 252.

Mathematics and Statistics

A math placement test is offered to Oxford campus students. (The regional campuses offer other standardized placement tests.) This test helps assess your readiness for calculus if you expect to take a mathematics or statistics course. Precalculus topics of algebra, trigonometry, functions, and basic geometry are included on the test. More information about this test is online (http://www.MiamiOH.edu/MSTEST) or available from a departmental advisor.

If you plan to and you have passed these high school classes and have these scores on the test then take
Take a calculus course(a) a year of calculus including log, exponential, and trig functions5 on AP Calculus ABMTH 249
(b) three and one-half or four years of math with trig but little or no calculus16 to 25 and 1-31 on AP Calculus AB or no AP examMTH 151
(c) three or four years of math including some trig12 to 15MTH 123
8 to 11MTH 104
(d) less than three years of math0 to 7MTH 102
Take a noncalculus course, e.g. MTH 121 or STA 261(a) three years of math, including two years of algebra12 to 25MTH 121 or STA 261
(b) less than three years of math0 to 11MTH 102 or MTH 104
Seek middle childhood licensure with a math concentration(a) a year of calculus, including log, exponential, and trig functions19 to 25 and 3-5 on AP Calculus ABMTH 217 or MTH 218
(b) three and one-half or four years of math with trig but little or no calculus16 to 25MTH 151
(c) three or four years of math including some trig12 to 15MTH 123
(d) less than three years of math0 to 11MTH 102 or MTH 104
Seek licensure in early or middle childhod, not concentrating in math(a) three years of math, including geometry12 to 25MTH 115
(b) less than three years of math0 to 11MTH 102
1

A score of 3 on the AP Calculus AB will confer credit for MTH 151. However, if you intend to eventually take Calculus II, the department recommends retaking MTH 151.

Since recommendations given above or online may not consider all information relevant to your situation, you should contact a departmental advisor if you have questions. The goal is to place you in a course with students of similar preparations.

To contact the Department of Mathematics, call 513-529-5818.