The College of Arts and Science

Arts and Science and University Studies Advising Office
146 Upham Hall
Phone: 513-529-3031
www.cas.MiamiOH.edu

General Information

The College of Arts and Science, as the centerpiece of liberal arts education at Miami University, is the largest division on campus. As such, the College encompasses a rich diversity of interdisciplinary opportunities and experiences across the humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences.

Using this broad foundation, an Arts and Science education is devoted to intellectual analysis, critical thinking, and honing transferable skills that will be used for a student’s entire lifetime. Employers demand a smart, globally minded workforce that can creatively solve problems while drawing upon a broad and adaptable skill set, and the College prepares its students for a vast array of career opportunities.

The College offers three degrees: the Bachelor of Arts, the Bachelor of Arts in International Studies, and the Bachelor of Science

Accreditation

Departments in the College that are accredited by professional associations are:

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry: American Chemical Society

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry: Chemistry and Biochemistry by the ASBMB (American Society of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology)

Department of Psychology: American Psychological Association

Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology (graduate program only) by the Council of Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology

General Requirements

These are the general requirements of the College of Arts and Science for graduation:

  • Earn at least 128 semester hours, 56 must be advanced (at 200 level and above).
  • Fulfill the Global Miami Plan (MP), the College Requirement (CAS), and the requirements of your major.
  • Earn a 2.00 cumulative grade point average, as well as a  2.00 average in all courses taken in your department(s) of major.

If you are a transfer student, you must take a substantial portion of your major requirements at Miami.  You will work with an Arts and Science divisional academic advisor at the time of transfer to help facilitate your transition.

Notes on Credit Restrictions

Before registering for your courses, you should keep in mind these restrictions on credit:

  • You may not earn credit for a lower-numbered course in a department if you have already taken a closely related, higher-numbered course for credit. For example, if you have passed FRE 201FRE 202, you cannot take FRE 101FRE 102 and receive credit for them.
  • Credit is not given for closely related courses in two or more divisions; be sure to consult the courses of instruction portion of this bulletin to see if courses are duplicative credit.
  • You cannot register for more than 20 hours in a semester except with the approval of the Dean or his/her designee.
 

Bachelor of Arts

Bachelor of Arts in International Studies

Bachelor of Science

Co-majors

Minors

In addition to majors, the College of Arts and Science offers minors. A minor is a specific program to be taken along with a major to complement your skills and increase your career opportunities. Taking a minor is optional.

A minimum 2.00 GPA is required for all courses in the minor. Additional requirements and qualifications are included in the Other Requirements chapter. Students may use a minor to satisfy the Thematic Sequence requirement only if the minor is outside the department of major. Some programs offer certificates to students who successfully complete the program.

The required semester hours are in parentheses beside each minor.

Area of Major

In order for you to understand these areas and how they pertain to the College requirement, we list below all majors in Arts and Science and which area the major is in:

Humanities

American studies
Black world studies
Classical humanities
Classical languages
East Asian languages and cultures
English (all major programs)
French
German
History
International studies
Italian Studies
Latin American, Latino/and Caribbean studies
Linguistics
Philosophy
Religion
Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies
Spanish

Social Science

Anthropology
Diplomacy and Global Politics
Economics
Geography
Gerontology
Journalism
Media and Culture
Political science
Psychology
Public administration
Social justice studies
Sociology
Speech pathology and audiology
Strategic communication
Urban and regional planning
Women's, gender and sexuality studies

Natural Science

Biochemistry
Biology
Biological Physics
Botany
Chemistry
Earth Science
Engineering physics
Environmental Earth Science
Geology
Mathematics
Medical laboratory science
Microbiology
Physics
Statistics
Zoology

Interdisciplinary Programs

The College of Arts and Science offers a range of interdisciplinary programs including specialized degrees, major, minors, and co-majors. These interdisciplinary programs allow students to consider a topic, subject, or problem from differing perspectives and to explore connections between those academic disciplines. Students pursuing these programs work closely with professors and advisors to select courses from across the curriculum that will provide opportunities to identify the intersections between multiple disciplines.

The College of Arts and Science offers interdisciplinary programs in the following areas:

Majors

American Studies
Black World Studies
Individualized Studies
International Studies
Italian Studies
Journalism
Linguistics
Latin American Latino/a and Caribbean Studies
Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Co-Majors

Analytics
Comparative Media Studies
Energy
Environmental Science
Interactive Media Studies
Premedical Studies
Sustainability

Minors

American Studies
Asian/Asian American Studies
Black World Studies
East Asian Studies
Ethics, Society and Culture
European Area Studies
Film Studies
Global Perspectives on Sustainability
Interdisciplinary Studies
Interactive Media Studies
Jewish Studies
Latin American Studies
Linguistics
Medieval Studies
Middle East and Islamic Studies
Molecular Biology
Neuroscience
Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Departmental Honors

The College of Arts and Science offers a program in departmental honors for students who qualify for and desire independent work in a major field of study under the guidance of a faculty mentor(s). Students who successfully complete such an effort graduate with a departmental honors notation on their transcripts and under their names in the commencement program.

To qualify for entrance into the departmental honors program, you must be a senior, a major in the College of Arts and Science, and have a grade point average of at least 3.50 in the major in which departmental honors work is desired. You must meet specific requirements of the department or academic program in which honors work is to be done; you must consult with the appropriate department or program director about specific requirements.

Qualifying students register for a 480 course (include department abbreviation; for example, BIO 480): departmental honors (1-6, maximum 6) for a minimum total of 4 semester hours and a maximum total of 6 semester hours. These credits may be taken in one or more semesters of your senior year. The approval of the department chair or program director and the faculty mentor of your honors work is required to register for this course.

Expectations are rigorous and demanding, but the nature of projects varies. Projects might involve independent readings, creative efforts, internships, or research, based in the laboratory, field, or library. The project must result in a tangible product, such as an examination, written report, paper or monograph, oral presentation, work of art, or documentary.

Departmental honors in the College may be coordinated and integrated with work for Senior Directed Study in the University Honors Program. A common project may serve both departmental honors and university honors but separate and distinct presentations must be made to the department or program and to the University Honors Program for evaluation to earn both honors notations.

Combined Programs

Combined programs require students to transfer to other institutions to complete professional training programs. These are also called 3+1 or 4+1 programs (three or four years here, one year at another institution) or 3-2 programs (three years here, two at another institution).

Please understand that in most cases we cannot guarantee your acceptance into a program at another institution.

Medical Laboratory Science

Medical laboratory scientists apply scientific background and skills to supervision and performance of diagnostic procedures to determine presence or absence of disease and to monitor response to treatment.

Miami offers two baccalaureate degree programs that include a 12-month laboratory "clinical year." In the 3+1 program, you take three years at Miami followed by an internship to receive a B.S. in medical laboratory science. In the 4+1 program, you take four years at Miami to earn an A.B. or B.S. in biology, zoology, chemistry, or microbiology, and then you enter the clinical year.

After completing either program, you are eligible to take national registry examinations. Please understand that Miami cannot guarantee your acceptance into a clinical year site.

3+1 Program

This program requires 96 pre-clinical year semester hours at Miami, 32 in advanced courses. You take an interdepartmental sequence of courses in biology, chemistry, and microbiology. Specific requirements include: general microbiology, pathogenic microbiology, and immunology, a year of general chemistry and a year of organic chemistry (or organic chemistry and biochemistry), one year of general biology; a course in mathematics; competency in computer usage; and completion of a foreign language at second-year level.

During your junior year, you must file a petition in the dean's office of the College of Arts and Science to be graduated in this program. When you apply for a clinical year at a hospital, you must have a letter of intent from the Registrar of Miami University.

During your clinical year, you will be registered for MBI 487, MBI 488 and MBI 489 at Miami. These courses fulfill the Global Miami Plan Capstone Experience requirement. Clinical laboratory rotations and lecture series may include hematology, chemistry, bacteriology, immunology, virology, parasitology, and mycology along with electives such as laboratory management and forensics. After you complete your clinical year and certify this to the University Registrar's Office, you will be awarded the B.S. in medical laboratory science.

Affiliated training hospitals for this program include The Cleveland Clinic; University of Cincinnati Hospital; Wright State University in Dayton; Southwest General Health Center near Cleveland; Children's Hospital Medical Center of Akron; St. Elizabeth Medical Center in Covington, Kentucky; Parkview Memorial Hospital in Fort Wayne, Indiana; and Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee; and St. John Health Laboratories in Michigan.

4+1 Program

For this program, you choose a major in biology, chemistry, or microbiology and fulfill all departmental, Arts and Science, and Miami Plan requirements for the baccalaureate degree. Pre-clinical year course requirements are: a year of general chemistry, a year of organic chemistry (or organic chemistry and biochemistry), a year of introductory biology, and one course in mathematics and general microbiology.

During fall semester of your senior year, you apply to enter a clinical year program at any hospital approved by the National Accrediting Agency for Medical Laboratory Sciences in the U.S.

For more information about either program in medical laboratory science, see the program advisor in the Department of Microbiology.

Co-Majors

Note: Co-Majors are designed to provide a complementary perspective to a student’s primary major. There is no specific degree designation for the co-major, students receive the degree designation of their primary major.

Analytics Co-Major

The analytics co-major is truly interdisciplinary and provides a framework for thinking about the collection and use of data that will complement the pursuit of any major across the university. Students will take courses that develop skills for handling structured and unstructured data sets as well as developing models to predict behavior in data-rich environments.

Critical and Classic Languages and Cultures Co-Major

Students are increasingly electing to study more than one foreign language and, quite frequently, combine a Western language with a non-Western one. Those who decide to branch out into a second language often derive the greatest benefit if they move beyond the beginning level of their second language. This co-major is designed to help students structure language course selections so that they can acquire significant competence in two languages, even if it does not delve as deeply into either language as a major otherwise would. This focus on language acquisition can be a powerful prospective professional skill.

Comparative Media Studies Co-Major

The comparative media studies co-major will bring together students from across the university to collaborate and innovate in interdisciplinary modes of media analysis and production. This co-major will train students to analyze media from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, from qualitative ethnography in sociology to textual analysis in English, from spatial analysis in geography to aesthetic approaches in art history. It is intended to supplement a student’s existing major by adding a media concentration.

Energy Co-Major

The goal of the energy co-major is to provide students with interdisciplinary training in energy that complements majors in architecture, business, engineering, natural science and social science. The co-major will provide students with a common set of principles in energy systems engineering.

Environmental Science Co-Major

The environmental science co-major emphasizes earth science and life science approaches to understanding environmental patterns and processes. Students are prepared to pursue a wide variety of career paths and post-graduate degrees in environmental science, especially those with biological and physical science specializations. The term "co-major" indicates that students must complete another major at Miami University. The environmental science co-major complements the primary major, which provides significant depth and breadth in an academic discipline.

Film Studies Co-Major

This interdisciplinary co-major features an open structure that allows students to develop individual programs featuring coursework in film history and analysis as well as scriptwriting and production.  Students will be introduced to principles of film aesthetics and design and will learn about key events in the history of cinema that inform its current form, content, standards, and industry structures.  They also will be exposed to important theories addressing film meaning and interpretation as well as the global dimensions of the medium.  Senior-level advanced study options allow students to draw upon knowledge gained from earlier coursework for application in individual and group projects.  

Interactive Media Studies Co-Major

The co-major in interactive media studies is an interdisciplinary co-major that is designed to complement the traditional disciplinary-focused major. (It cannot be taken independently of a disciplinary focus). This co-major includes courses that span across the breadth of Miami University's offerings. From art to the humanities to computer science, the IMS co-major brings the inherently interdisciplinary world of technology to the traditionally disciplined student. There are four concentrations within the co-major that allow students to focus their experience on a particular area of interactive media, and to better complement their disciplinary area of focus. These concentrations include: digital art and design, digital games studies, digital humanities and social science, and a self-designed concentration (advisor approval required).  An application and portfolio are required for admittance and there is a minimum 2.50 GPA requirement for a limited number of students are each year.

Neuroscience Co-Major

This inter-departmental co-major offers students the opportunity to pursue an in-depth exploration of the biology of individual nerve cells; the organization of nerve cells into a functional nervous system; and the role of the nervous system in behavior and cognition. The co-major is multidisciplinary, including coursework in biology, psychology, chemistry and statistics. It provides a basic framework for students planning advanced work at the graduate level.  

Premedical Studies Co-Major

Provides a broad-based premedical background and prepares students to pursue advanced degrees in medicine as well as other healthcare related fields. Integrates comprehensive, regularly scheduled premedical advising with courses that cover fundamental concepts in the biological, physical, and social sciences required for admission to medical school or other health professional schools, and/or in preparation for the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). A co-major must be taken in conjunction with a primary major, which provides the significant depth and breadth of an academic discipline; it cannot be taken independently.

Note: Students are not required to complete the co-major for successful application and admittance to medical school or other health professional schools. Premedical Studies courses as well as access to services provided by the Mallory-Wilson Center for Healthcare Education and the Premedical Advisory Committee are available to all students.

Sustainability Co-Major

The sustainability co-major emphasizes human-nature interaction in understanding environmental patterns and processes. Students are prepared to pursue a wide variety of career paths and post-graduate degrees in environmental science, especially those with management and policy specializations. The term "co-major" indicates that students must complete another major at Miami University. The sustainability co-major complements the primary major, which provides significant depth and breadth in an academic discipline.

Planning for Law School

Law school is a popular option for Arts and Science majors. From 2010 to 2013, 94% of Miami senior applicants were accepted to law school, compared to a national average of 83%.

Students interested in law school are encouraged to select a major that interests them. Regardless of the major you select, you should take courses that will enhance those skills that are necessary for success in law school.

According to the Law School Admission Council, "as long as [students] receive an education including critical analysis, logical reasoning, and written and oral expression, the range of acceptable college majors is very broad." To develop these very essential skills, students should consider taking courses in the humanities, such as political science or history (critical analysis), philosophy (logic), communication and English (oral/written communication), and math and science (analytical reasoning).

Most law schools have high standards for grade point average (GPA) and Law School Admission Test (LSAT) scores. In fact, the median GPA for students accepted to the top 25 percent of law schools exceeds 3.50. Similarly, the median LSAT score for these schools is 160 (120-180 scale). In addition to success in the classroom, participation in community service, student activities, leadership training and experience, and study abroad are a plus.

If you are interested in law school, you should contact a pre-law advisor in our Pre-Law Center in 159 Upham Hall as early in your college career as possible.

Planning for Medical, Dental, and Veterinary Schools

Most medical, dental, and veterinary schools limit admission requirements to allow for students from a variety of undergraduate programs. All schools recognize the desirability of a broad education that includes a strong foundation in natural sciences, the basis for study and practice of health professions; communication skills, essential for developing successful relationships with the public and professionals; and social sciences and humanities, in order to better understand yourself and others.

Therefore, you should follow an undergraduate program that is as broad and comprehensive as possible in order to prepare for a career in a people-oriented profession in a changing society. Pursuing a double major in sciences is not advised if it is done at the expense of obtaining a broad education.

Common admission requirements include two years of chemistry, two years of biology, one year of physics, and one year of English. However, requirements of schools may vary. You should therefore consider individual requirements of schools and plan your curriculum accordingly.

Students who plan to go to professional schools should see an academic advisor before taking any course on a credit/no-credit basis. In addition, using AP credit for classes required by professional schools is not recommended.

Many students planning to attend medical, dental, or veterinary school major in biology, zoology, microbiology, chemistry or biochemistry.

A recommended program for your first year is:

Select one of the following:
Biological Concepts: Ecology, Evolution, Genetics, and Diversity
and Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular, and Molecular Biology
Calculus I
and Calculus II
Select the following:
CHM 141
CHM 144
College Chemistry
and College Chemistry Laboratory
5
CHM 142
CHM 145
College Chemistry
and College Chemistry Laboratory
5
One year of English Composition or Equivalent
Electives (applying toward the College Requirement and Miami Plan)

Science courses are demanding and for many freshmen the first semester is a difficult period. Therefore, your electives should not be difficult courses for you.

During your sophomore and/or junior year, take organic chemistry and lab (CHM 241, CHM 242 and CHM 244, CHM 245 or CHM 251, CHM 252 and CHM 254, CHM 255) and physics and lab (PHY 161 and PHY 162 or PHY 191 and PHY 192). A year of biology (BIO/MBI 115, BIO/MBI 116 or BIO 113, BIO 114) should be taken sometime during your first two years.

Medical schools require the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), dental schools require the Dental Admission Test (DAT), and most veterinary schools want the Graduate Record Exam. You are strongly urged to talk with a pre-professional advisor as early as possible in preparing for one of these careers.

For information, talk with one of our pre-medicine advisors in biology or in chemistry and biochemistry, microbiology, physics, or psychology. Pre-dentistry and pre-veterinary advisors are also in biology.

Planning for Optometry School

Typical admission requirements for optometry school include one year of English, one year of biology, two years of chemistry, one year of physics, one semester of mathematics (calculus and statistics), one semester of psychology, one year of social science, one semester of microbiology, and one or two semesters of physiology. Since specific requirements vary, you should contact schools where you may apply, and plan your curriculum accordingly. Most pre-optometry students major in biology, zoology, chemistry, or microbiology.

Optometry schools require the Optometry Admission Test. It is available only online (http://www.ada.org/en/oat/).

A recommended program for your first year is:

BIO 115
BIO 116
Biological Concepts: Ecology, Evolution, Genetics, and Diversity
and Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular, and Molecular Biology
8
CHM 141
CHM 142
College Chemistry
and College Chemistry
6
CHM 144
CHM 145
College Chemistry Laboratory
and College Chemistry Laboratory
4
One year of English Composition or Equivalent
MTH 151Calculus I5
Electives (choose from CAS requirements and Miami Plan Foundation courses)

Planning for Pharmacy School

Because the Doctor of Pharmacy is now the only accredited degree for pharmacy, you should complete a bachelor's degree (usually in zoology, microbiology, or chemistry), or at least two years of prerequisite coursework, and apply to a Doctor of Pharmacy program.

Typical prerequisites for pharmacy school include course work in calculus; inorganic, organic, and analytical chemistry; English, biology or microbiology, physics and statistics. Since specific requirements vary, contact schools of interest, and plan your curriculum accordingly. For more information, consult with the pre-pharmacy advisor in the Department of Biology.

Planning for Physical Therapy School

If you are interested in a career in physical or occupational therapy, you should take courses that meet the prerequisites for graduate degree programs in those areas. The Pre-Physical and Pre-Occupational Therapy Program at Miami is designed to provide students with the basic science and related courses needed for background preparation and admission into an accredited physical or occupational therapy program.

The American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) has announced that all physical therapy programs must offer doctoral degrees by 2020. According to the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), all baccalaureate occupational therapy programs nationwide are expected to transition to master's degree granting programs by 2007. Therefore, students interested in physical or occupational therapy usually complete their bachelor's degree at Miami and then apply to a master's or doctoral degree program in physical or occupational therapy at another school.

Because there is no standard set of prerequisite courses required by physical or occupational therapy programs, you must contact schools for their requirements. Select courses at Miami that will meet requirements for your program.

The following courses are required prior to admission by most programs (note that this is only a general guideline):

BIO/MBI 115Biological Concepts: Ecology, Evolution, Genetics, and Diversity4
or BIO 113 Animal Diversity
BIO/MBI 116Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular, and Molecular Biology4
or BIO 114 Principles of Biology
BIO 201Human Anatomy 14
BIO 305Human Physiology 24
or BIO 161 Principles of Human Physiology
Select the following:
CHM 141
CHM 144
College Chemistry
and College Chemistry Laboratory
5
CHM 142
CHM 145
College Chemistry
and College Chemistry Laboratory
5
ENG 111Composition and Rhetoric3
KNH 244
244L
Functional Anatomy
and Functional Anatomy Laboratory
4
KNH 381Biodynamics of Human Performance3
KNH 468/KNH 568Physiology and Biophysics of Human Activity3
PHY 161Physics for the Life Sciences with Laboratory I4
PHY 162Physics for the Life Sciences with Laboratory II4
PSY 111Introduction to Psychology3
PSY 231Developmental Psychology3
STA 261Statistics4
Other suggested courses include:
CHM 231Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry4
CHM 332Outlines of Biochemistry3
PHL 131Introduction to Ethics 33
or PHL 375 Medical Ethics
or SOC 357 Medical Sociology
STC 135Principles of Public Speaking3
1

 Meets human anatomy prerequisite.

2

 Meets human physiology prerequisite.

3

SOC 357 is one semester of philosophy/medical ethics.

For more information, contact a physical therapy program advisor in the Department of Biology or the Department of Kinesiology and Health.

Teacher Licensure

Combining a teacher licensure program with a major in the College of Arts and Science makes a student eligible for two degrees: an A.B. or B.S. degree in the College of Arts and Science and a B.S. in Education degree in the College of Education, Health and Society. Students who wish to combine licensure with an arts and science major must observe rules, procedures, and restrictions pertaining to admission to a licensure cohort.

If you choose to earn two degrees, you must meet all requirements for the Miami Plan, the College of Arts and Science, and teacher licensure. Early in your program, you should plan your schedule with academic advisors from the College of Arts and Science and the College of Education, Health and Society.

The following departments offer the possibility of combining the teacher licensure program with an Arts and Science major: Biology, Chemistry, Classical Languages, Economics, English, French, Geography, Geology & Environmental Earth Science, German, History, Mathematics, Physics, Political Science, and Spanish.

For information, contact the Department of Teacher Education in the College of Education, Health and Society, 202 McGuffey Hall (513-529-6443).

Geographic Information Science Certificate

This certificate program focuses on the theory and techniques of geographic information science (GISci). GISci is a suite of techniques for collecting, analyzing, and communicating information about the Earth's surface through technologies such as geographic information systems, satellite and aerial imaging, and global positioning systems (GPS).

Program Requirements (18 semester hours)

GEO 441/GEO 541Geographic Information Systems3
GEO 442/GEO 542Advanced Geographic Information Systems3
GEO 443/GEO 543Python Programming for ArcGIS3
GEO 448/GEO 548Techniques and Applications of Remote Sensing3
Select two of the following:6
Database Design and Development
Database Systems and Data Warehousing
Internship 1
GIScience Techniques in Landscape Ecology
Aerial Photo Interpretation
Advanced 3D Visualization and Simulation
Any GEO course focusing on GIS or remote sensing techniques
Total Credit Hours18
1

 With the expectation that the internship involves GIS.

Special Interest Areas

If you are interested in one of these areas, we suggest you look into the Arts and Science degree program(s) listed beside it.

Area Arts and Science Major
AdvertisingEnglish, media and culture
ArchaeologyAnthropology, classics, geology, religion
BacteriologyMicrobiology
BiologyBiology, botany, microbiology, zoology
City planningUrban and regional planning
Creative writingEnglish/creative writing
CriminologySociology, criminology minor
Environmental scienceBiology, botany (environmental science emphasis), earth science, environmental earth science, geography, geology (environmental science emphasis), zoology; environmental science co-major, sustainability co-major
Foreign affairsDiplomacy and global politics, international studies, foreign languages
ForestryBotany
GerontologyGerontology, sociology
Government workPolitical science, diplomacy and global politics, international studies, public administration, urban and regional planning
JournalismJournalism, media and culture
LanguageLinguistics, speech pathology and audiology, foreign languages
Neuroscience Biology, zoology, psychology
Personnel workPsychology, public administration
PharmacyBiology, chemistry, microbiology, zoology
Physical therapyBiology, psychology, zoology
Public relationsStrategic communication, journalism
Social workSociology, psychology
StatisticsMathematics and statistics, statistics, analytics co-major
Television and radioMedia and culture, journalism

Miami has a graduate degree program in environmental science. See the Graduate Bulletin for more information.

The College Requirement (CAS)

The divisional requirement in Arts and Science is called the College Requirement (CAS). The CAS Requirement emphasizes skills and competencies needed for the 21st century, as well as breadth of knowledge in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences (biological and physical). Together with the depth of knowledge acquired within a major, the CAS Requirement prepares students for a variety of educational, professional, and career aspirations

If you are working toward a Bachelor of Arts (A.B.), you must fulfill all sections of the CAS Requirement; if you are working toward a Bachelor of Science (B.S.), you must fulfill only CAS-A (foreign language), but the B.S. requires more hours of within your major and related hours.

The College Requirement includes:

CAS-A Foreign Language
CAS-B Humanities
CAS-C Social Science
CAS-D Natural Science
CAS-E Formal Reasoning
CAS-QL Quantitative Literacy
CAS-W Writing Competence

When you plan your program, keep these important points in mind:

  • Although some CAS and Miami Plan courses overlap, not all courses will count toward both requirements: see the section on CAS courses that fulfill Miami Plan Foundation requirements.
  • Some courses you take for the Miami Plan or the College Requirement can also help fulfill your major, minor, or related hour requirement.
  • Any course cross-listed in two or more departments can be used to satisfy a requirement appropriate to any of the departments in which it is listed.

CAS-A Foreign Language

Direct acquisition of a different communication system facilitates access to a foreign culture. It also promotes understanding of how language structures human consciousness, increases the understanding of your own language, and makes possible a more informed awareness of the interaction between language and other social institutions.

All foreign languages taught at Miami are applicable for this requirement. They include American Sign Language, Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Latin, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish. If you take a course with a 202-level course prerequisite, that course automatically satisfies CAS-A.

GRK 202 or LAT 202 may fulfill either CAS-A or CAS-B-LIT, but not both.

Requirement: The foreign language requirement may be met in any one of the following ways:

  • By passing the 202 course (or its equivalent in a program abroad), or a language course at the 300 level or above. Courses in English translation cannot apply to this requirement.
  • By earning credit through a foreign language examination (Advanced Placement or College Level Examination Program) with an appropriate score. Information on acceptable scores is included in  the Academic Planning chapter of this Bulletin.
  • International students whose native language is not English may use English to satisfy the foreign language requirement. (See the College of Arts & Science Academic Advising Office.)
  • Students who are fluent in a language not offered at Miami University should work with a divisional advisor on how to satisfy this requirement.
  • In some language departments admission to language skills courses may be denied to native or quasi-native speakers and heritage speakers.

The foreign language placement guide in the Academic Planning section describes the background necessary to enter a course at a certain level; this will help you choose your first course. Placement tests are a diagnostic tool and do not award academic credit.

See CAS - Miami Plan Foundations (MPF) for a list of CAS-A courses that also fulfill Miami Plan Foundation requirements.

CAS-B Humanities

(9 semester hours)

Liberally educated students become familiar with and understand human values as they are expressed in societies and cultures. They know events and ideas that help form ideals, classical and contemporary literature that expresses beliefs, and religious and philosophical principles that stand behind actions. They are cognizant of processes whereby these values and works came into being, of methods by which they may be examined, and of needs and desires they express and fulfill.

Requirement: Nine semester hours of which six hours must be from two different categories: history, literature, philosophy, and religion.

Humanities courses include all courses from the departments of History, (including CLS 101 and CLS 102), Philosophy (except PHL 273), Comparative Religion and literature courses offered by the departments of Classics; English; French and Italian; German, Russian, and East Asian Languages; and Spanish and Portuguese and Theatre. These literature courses are designated CAS-B-LIT in the Courses of Instruction section of this Bulletin.

The remaining three hours to equal the total nine hours required may be taken from the categories listed above or from a list of courses that do not fulfill a specific category.

See CAS - Miami Plan Foundations (MPF) for a list of CAS-B courses that also fulfill Miami Plan Foundation requirements.

CAS-C Social Science

(9 semester hours)

Through study of social science (the systematic study of human behavior, human institutions, and theoretical models through which human beings attempt to organize their lives), liberally educated students become familiar with regularities and variations in human behavior, with explanations of these regularities and variations, with methods useful in systematically and objectively validating propositions concerning these phenomena, and with potential for analyzing human behavior objectively.

Requirement: Nine semester hours of which six hours must be from two different categories: anthropology, economics, geography, political science, psychology, and sociology/gerontology.

Social Science courses include all courses from the departments of Anthropology; Economics; Geography (except GEO 121, GEO 431/GEO 531, and GEO 432/GEO 532); Political Science; Psychology; and Sociology and Gerontology.

The remaining three hours to equal the total nine hours required may be taken from the categories listed above or from a list of courses that do not fulfill a specific category.

See CAS - Miami Plan Foundations (MPF) for a list of CAS-C courses that also fulfill Miami Plan Foundation requirements.

CAS-D Natural Science

(10 semester hours)

Liberally educated students learn to understand natural phenomena through observations and experimentation. Physical sciences are involved largely with the behavior of energy, particles, atoms, and molecules. Biological sciences are concerned with nature, variation, richness, and interactions of phenomena of life. The natural science requirement introduces you to various aspects of scientific inquiry as practiced in biology, botany, chemistry, geology, microbiology, physical geography, and physics. Laboratory experience is included to demonstrate the relationship between theories or models used within a given science and experimental results.

Requirement: Ten semester hours from courses within the College of Arts and Science natural science areas, including at least three semester hours in physical science, three semester hours in biological science and one laboratory course (lab courses are designated CAS-D/LAB in the Courses of Instruction section of this Bulletin).

Physical science includes all courses offered by the departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Geology & Environmental Earth Science, and Physics; as well as GEO 121 and GEO 122 .

Biological science includes all courses offered by the departments of Biology (except BIO 128) and Microbiology as well as and GEO 431/GEO 531, and GEO 432/GEO 532.

See CAS - Miami Plan Foundations (MPF) for a list of CAS-D courses that also fulfill Miami Plan Foundation requirements.

CAS-E Formal Reasoning

(3 semester hours)

Liberally educated students enhance their capacity to reason through the study in inductive and deductive thinking. Disciplines that employ formalized languages as the means to develop such thinking include mathematics, statistics, logic, and linguistics.

Requirement: Three semester hours, designated as CAS-E in the Courses of Instruction section of this Bulletin.

You should take the university's math placement test and then consult the mathematics and statistics placement guide in the Academic Planning chapter or an academic advisor, to determine the appropriate course for you to take.

See CAS - Miami Plan Foundations (MPF) for a list of CAS-E courses that also fulfill Miami Plan Foundation requirements.

CAS-QL Quantitative Literacy

(3 semester hours)

Liberally educated students learn the "habit of mind" associated with reasoning and solving quantitative problems from a wide array of authentic contexts and everyday life situations.

Requirement: Three semester hours, designated as CAS-QL in the Courses of Instruction section of this Bulletin. A student cannot take a course for both this requirement and the Global Miami Plan Foundation V or CAS-E requirements; however, the same course can be applied to the other Global Miami Plan Foundation or CAS requirements.

Quantitative literacy courses include:

ATH 496Observing Primate Behavior4
BIO/MBI 116Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular, and Molecular Biology4
BIO 161Principles of Human Physiology4
CHM 111Chemistry in Modern Society3
CHM 375Analytical Chemistry for Majors3
ECO 311Examining Economic Data and Models3
ENG 222The Rhetoric of Information and Data Visualization3
GEO 205Population and Migration3
GEO 242Mapping a Changing World3
GHS 201Data and Decisions in Global Health3
GLG 111The Dynamic Earth3
GLG 121Environmental Geology3
GLG 141Geology of U.S. National Parks3
HST 202History and Numbers3
IMS/JRN/STA 404Advanced Data Visualization3
JRN 404/JRN 504Advanced Data Visualization3
JRN 412Public Affairs Reporting3
MTH 435/MTH 535Mathematical Modeling Seminar3
MTH 453/MTH 553Numerical Analysis3
POL 241American Political System3
POL 306Applied Research Methods3
PSY 293Research Design and Analyses in Psychology I4
PSY 294Research Design and Analyses in Psychology II4
PSY 324Advanced Social Psychology 13
SOC 262Research Methods3
STA/ISA 333Nonparametric Statistics3
STA 363Introduction to Statistical Modeling3
STA 404/STA 504Advanced Data Visualization3
STA 475Data Analysis Practicum3
WGS 204Gender, Science, & Technology3
1

Only specific sections of PSY 324 are designated QL; see the departmental advisor for information.

See CAS - Miami Plan Foundations (MPF) for a list of CAS-QL courses that also fulfill Miami Plan Foundation requirements.

CAS-W Writing Competence1

Liberally educated students develop advanced writing abilities in their majors. Students learn the writing practices and conventions of their discipline or interdisciplinary area and communicate the results of research in their area to a general public.

Effective writing is learned gradually and through ongoing attention and sustained feedback. As such, each Bachelor of Arts major has a course or set of courses embedded in the requirements for the major. These courses are identified in the Bachelor of Arts major descriptions.

1

Students in the College of Arts and Science in Bachelor of Arts degree programs meet the Advanced Writing Requirement for the Global Miami Plan by completing the writing in the major requirement.

CAS Courses That Fulfill Miami Plan Foundation (MPF) Requirements

A course can be use once in the Global Miami Plan and a second time for the CAS requirements; we call this "double-dipping".  This page is meant to help you identify courses that will double-dip and is separated by each CAS requirement:

CAS-A Foreign LanguageCAS-B HumanitiesCAS-C Social ScienceCAS-D Natural ScienceCAS-E Formal Reasoning, and CAS-QL Quantitative Literacy
 

A course can only be used once within the CAS requirements- the only exception to this is with a natural science course that has a built-in laboratory component, which will cover the lab requirement (credit is not awarded twice, the course is just applied in both places).  

CAS-A Foreign Language

MPF Humanities
FRE 202Critical Analysis of French Culture3
MPF Global Perspectives
FRE 202Critical Analysis of French Culture3

CAS-B Humanities (9 hrs)

Nine semester hours, six hours taken from two categories: History, Literature, Philosophy and Religion.

The remaining three hours may be either taken from one of these categories or from the courses found below in the non-specific category that also fulfill a Global Miami Plan requirement.

History

Any HST course, or one of the following courses that also fulfill a Global Miami Plan requirement:

MPF Humanities
BWS 224Africa to 18843
BWS 225The Making of Modern Africa3
CLS 101Greek Civilization in its Mediterranean Context3
CLS 102Roman Civilization3
HST 111Survey of American History3
HST 112Survey of American History3
HST 121Western Civilization3
HST 122Western Civilization3
HST 197World History to 15003
HST 198World History Since 15003
HST 224Africa to 18843
HST 225The Making of Modern Africa3
HST 245Making of Modern Europe, 1450-17503
HST 254Introduction to Russian and Eurasian Studies3
HST 260Latin America in the United States3
HST 296World History Since 19453
LAS 260Latin America in the United States3
MPF Global Perspectives
HST 197World History to 15003
HST 198World History Since 15003
HST 245Making of Modern Europe, 1450-17503
HST 260Latin America in the United States3
HST 296World History Since 19453
LAS 260Latin America in the United States3
MPF Intercultural Perspectives
AMS 213Appalachia: Cultures and Music3
AMS 382Women in American History3
AMS 392Sex and Gender in American Culture3
BWS 221African-American History3
BWS 386Race in U.S. Society3
HST 213Appalachia: Cultures and Music3
HST 221African-American History3
HST 260Latin America in the United States3
HST 382Women in American History3
HST 386Race in U.S. Society3
HST 392Sex and Gender in American Culture3
LAS 260Latin America in the United States3
WGS 382Women in American History3
WGS 392Sex and Gender in American Culture3

Literature

Any CAS-B Lit courses in AMS, ENG, CLS, THE, a foreign language literature course, or one of the courses below that also fulfills a Global Miami Plan requirement:

MPF Creative Arts
THE 101Introduction to Theatre: Drama and Analysis3
THE 191Experiencing Theatre3
MPF Humanities
AAA 248Asian American Literature3
AMS 246Native American Literature3
AMS 248Asian American Literature3
AMS 271Cultures and Literature of the American South3
ART 279Buddhism and Culture: China and Japan3
CHI 251Traditional Chinese Literature in English Translation3
CHI 252Modern Chinese Literature in English Translation3
CHI 255Drama in China and Japan in Translation3
CHI 257Chinese Satire3
CLS 121Introduction to Classical Mythology3
ENG 122Popular Literature3
ENG 123Introduction to Poetry3
ENG 124Introduction to Fiction3
ENG 125Introduction to Drama3
ENG 131Life and Thought in English Literature3
ENG 132Life and Thought in English Literature3
ENG 133Life and Thought in English Literature3
ENG 134Introduction to Shakespeare3
ENG 141Life and Thought in American Literature3
ENG 142Life and Thought in American Literature3
ENG 143Life and Thought in American Literature3
ENG 144Major American Authors3
ENG 162Literature and Identity3
ENG 163Literature and Travel3
ENG 165Literature and Sexuality3
ENG 246Native American Literature3
ENG 247Appalachian Literature3
ENG 248Asian American Literature3
ENG 251Life and Thought in European Literature3
ENG 252Life and Thought in European Literature3
ENG 254Latino/a Literature and the Americas3
ENG 255Russian Literature from Pushkin to Dostoevsky in English Translation3
ENG 256Russian Literature in English Translation: From Tolstoy to Nabokov3
ENG 267Russian Literature in English Translation: From Pasternak to the Present3
ENG 271Cultures and Literature of the American South3
FRE 131Masterpieces of French Culture in Translation3
GER 231Folk and Literary Fairy Tales3
GER 252The German-Jewish Experience3
GER 321Cultural Topics in German-Speaking Europe Since 18703
GER 322Comparative Study of Everyday Culture: German-Speaking Europe and the3
JPN 231Japanese Tales of the Supernatural in English Translation3
JPN 255Drama in China and Japan in English Translation3
JPN 279Buddhism and Culture: China and Japan3
LAS 254Latino/a Literature and the Americas3
RUS 137Russian Folklore3
RUS 255Russian Literature in English Translation From Pushkin to Dostoevsky3
RUS 256Russian Literature in English Translation: From Tolstoy to Nabokov3
RUS 257Russian Literature in English Translation: From Pasternak to the Present3
SPN 315Intro to Hispanic Literatures3
MPF Global Perspectives
CHI 257Chinese Satire3
ENG 254Latino/a Literature and the Americas3
ENG 256Russian Literature in English Translation: From Tolstoy to Nabokov3
ENG 267Russian Literature in English Translation: From Pasternak to the Present3
FRE 131Masterpieces of French Culture in Translation3
LAS 254Latino/a Literature and the Americas3
RUS 256Russian Literature in English Translation: From Tolstoy to Nabokov3
RUS 257Russian Literature in English Translation: From Pasternak to the Present3
MPF Intercultural Perspectives
AAA 248Asian American Literature3
AMS 246Native American Literature3
AMS 248Asian American Literature3
AMS 271Cultures and Literature of the American South3
ENG 232American Women Writers3
ENG 246Native American Literature3
ENG 247Appalachian Literature3
ENG 248Asian American Literature3
ENG 254Latino/a Literature and the Americas3
ENG 271Cultures and Literature of the American South3
LAS 254Latino/a Literature and the Americas3
WGS 232American Women Writers3

Philosophy

Any PHL course except PHL 273, PHL 373; one of the courses below would also fulfill a Global Miami Plan requirement:

MPF Humanities
PHL 103Society and the Individual3
PHL 104Purpose or Chance in the Universe3
PHL 105Theories of Human Nature3
PHL 106Thought and Culture of India3
PHL 131Introduction to Ethics3

Religion

Any REL course, or one of the courses below that also fulfills a Global Miami Plan requirement:

MPF Humanities
AAA 203Global Religions of India3
BIO 128Religion, Science, and Origins3
REL 101Introduction to the Study of Religion3
REL 128Religion, Science, and Origins3
REL 133Imagining Russia3
REL 203Global Religions of India3
REL 254Introduction to Russian and Eurasian Studies3
REL 275Introduction to the Critical Study of Biblical Literature3
REL 286Global Jewish Civilization3
REL 314Social and Religious History of the Jewish People3
RUS 133Imagining Russia3
MPF Global Perspectives
AAA 203Global Religions of India3
REL 133Imagining Russia3
REL 203Global Religions of India3
REL 286Global Jewish Civilization3
RUS 133Imagining Russia3
MPF Intercultural Perspectives
AMS 241Religions of the American Peoples3
AMS 342Religious Pluralism in Modern America4
REL 241Religions of the American Peoples3
REL 313Marriage Across Cultures3
REL 342Religious Pluralism in Modern America3

Non-specific Category Courses

MPF Creative Arts
ARC 188Ideas in Architecture3
ART 185India and Southeast Asia3
ART 187History of Western Art: Prehistoric-Gothic3
ART 188History of Western Art: Renaissance - Modern3
ART 276Introduction to the Art of the Black Diaspora3
ART 286History of Asian Art, China, Korea, and Japan3
BWS 276Introduction to the Art of the Black Diaspora3
MUS 185The Diverse Worlds of Music3
MUS 186Global Music for the I-Pod3
MUS 189Great Ideas in Western Music3
MPF Humanities
AAA 201Introduction to Asian/ Asian American Studies3
AMS 205Introduction to American Cultures3
AMS 207America: Global and Intercultural Perspectives3
AMS 222Italian American Culture3
ARC 188Ideas in Architecture3
ART 185India and Southeast Asia3
ART 187History of Western Art: Prehistoric-Gothic3
ART 188History of Western Art: Renaissance - Modern3
ART 286History of Asian Art, China, Korea, and Japan3
BWS 204Brazilian Culture Through Popular Music3
BWS 276Introduction to the Art of the Black Diaspora3
BWS 383By or About (Afro-) Brazilian Women3
DST 169Disability Identity3
ENG 169Disability Identity3
ENG 171Humanities and Technology3
ENG 202Varieties of English: Dialect Diversity and Language Change3
ENG 238Narrative and Digital Technology3
ENG 383By or About (Afro-) Brazilian Women3
FRE 212Secular Jewish Culture From the Enlightenment to Zionism3
FRE 255Visual Representations of the Holocaust3
FST 201Film History and Analysis3
FST 204Brazilian Culture Through Popular Music3
FST 206Diversity and Culture in American Film3
FST 222Italian American Culture3
FST 255Visual Representations of the Holocaust3
FST 281Mediated Sexualities: Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals, and Transgendered Persons and the Electronic Media3
FST 383By or About (Afro-) Brazilian Women3
GER 151The German-American Experience3
GER 212Secular Jewish Culture From the Enlightenment to Zionism3
GER 232The Holocaust in German Literature, History, and Film3
GER 255Visual Representations of the Holocaust3
HST 111Survey of American History3
IDS 206Diversity and Culture in American Film3
IMS 171Humanities and Technology3
IMS 238Narrative and Digital Technology3
ITL 221Italy, Matrix of Civilization3
ITL 222Italian American Culture3
JRN 101Introduction to Journalism3
LAS 204Brazilian Culture Through Popular Music3
MUS 185The Diverse Worlds of Music3
MUS 186Global Music for the I-Pod3
MUS 204Brazilian Culture Through Popular Music3
POR 204Brazilian Culture Through Popular Music3
POR 383By or About (Afro-) Brazilian Women3
RUS 212Secular Jewish Culture From the Enlightenment to Zionism3
STC 281Mediated Sexualities: Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals, and Transgendered Persons and the Electronic Media3
WGS 202Introduction to GLBT Studies3
WGS 383By or About (Afro-) Brazilian Women3
WST 201Self and Place3
MPF Global Perspectives
AAA 201Introduction to Asian/ Asian American Studies3
AMS 207America: Global and Intercultural Perspectives3
ART 276Introduction to the Art of the Black Diaspora3
BWS 204Brazilian Culture Through Popular Music3
BWS 276Introduction to the Art of the Black Diaspora3
BWS 383By or About (Afro-) Brazilian Women3
ENG 383By or About (Afro-) Brazilian Women3
FST 204Brazilian Culture Through Popular Music3
FST 383By or About (Afro-) Brazilian Women3
GER 232The Holocaust in German Literature, History, and Film3
LAS 204Brazilian Culture Through Popular Music3
MUS 185The Diverse Worlds of Music3
MUS 186Global Music for the I-Pod3
MUS 204Brazilian Culture Through Popular Music3
POR 204Brazilian Culture Through Popular Music3
POR 383By or About (Afro-) Brazilian Women3
WGS 383By or About (Afro-) Brazilian Women3
Intercultural Perspectives
AMS 205Introduction to American Cultures3
AMS 207America: Global and Intercultural Perspectives3
AMS 222Italian American Culture3
DST 169Disability Identity3
ENG 169Disability Identity3
ENG 202Varieties of English: Dialect Diversity and Language Change3
FST 206Diversity and Culture in American Film3
FST 222Italian American Culture3
FST 281Mediated Sexualities: Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals, and Transgendered Persons and the Electronic Media3
GER 151The German-American Experience3
IDS 206Diversity and Culture in American Film3
ITL 222Italian American Culture3
STC 281Mediated Sexualities: Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals, and Transgendered Persons and the Electronic Media3
WGS 202Introduction to GLBT Studies3

CAS-C Social Science (9 hrs)

Nine semester hours, six hours taken from two categories: Anthropology, Economics, Geography, Political Science, Psychology and Sociology & Gerontology

The remaining three hours may be taken from the one of these categories or from the courses found below in the non-specific category that also fulfill a Global Miami Plan requirement.  

Anthropology

Any ATH course, LAS 208 or one of the following courses that also fulfill a Global Miami Plan requirement:

MPF Social Science
ATH 145Lost Cities & Ancient Civilizations3
ATH 155Introduction to Anthropology4
ATH 175Peoples of the World3
ATH 185Cultural Diversity in the U.S.3
ATH 206Introduction to Latin America3
ATH 405/ATH 505Food, Taste, and Desire3
LAS 208Introduction to Latin America3
MPF Global Perspectives
ATH 135Film as Ethnography1
ATH 145Lost Cities & Ancient Civilizations3
ATH 155Introduction to Anthropology4
ATH 175Peoples of the World3
ATH 185Cultural Diversity in the U.S.3
ATH 206Introduction to Latin America3
ATH 358Travelers, Migrants, and Refugees: Transnational Migration and Diasporic Communities3
ATH 361Language and Power3
ATH 405/ATH 505Food, Taste, and Desire3
FST 135Film as Ethnography1
LAS 208Introduction to Latin America3
MPF Intercultural Perspectives
ATH 185Cultural Diversity in the U.S.3

Economics

Any ECO course, or one of the following courses that also fulfill a Global Miami Plan requirement:

MPF Social Science
ECO 131Economic Perspectives on Inequality in America3
ECO 201Principles of Microeconomics3
ECO 202Principles of Macroeconomics3
MPF Intercultural Perspectives
ECO 131Economic Perspectives on Inequality in America3

Geography

Any GEO course (except GEO 121, GEO 122GEO 431/GEO 531, GEO 432/GEO 532), ITS 208, or one of the following courses that also fulfill a Global Miami Plan requirement:

MPF Social Science
GEO 101Global Forces, Local Diversity3
GEO 111World Regional Geography: Patterns and Issues3
GEO 159Creating Global Peace3
GEO 201Geography of Urban Diversity3
GEO 208The Rise of Industrialism in East Asia3
ITS 208The Rise of Industrialism in East Asia3
MPF Global Perspectives
GEO 101Global Forces, Local Diversity3
GEO 159Creating Global Peace3
MPF Intercultural Perspectives
GEO 201Geography of Urban Diversity3
GEO 302Geography and Gender3
GEO 309Native American Women3
GEO 436/GEO 536Women, Gender, and the Environment3
GEO 455Race, Urban Change, and Conflict in America3
GEO 458/GEO 558Cities of Difference3
WGS 309Native American Women3
WGS 436/WGS 536Women, Gender and the Environment3

Political Science

Any POL course, or one of the following courses that also fulfill a Global Miami Plan requirement:

MPF Social Science
POL 142American Politics and Diversity3
POL 221Modern World Governments3
POL 241American Political System3
POL 271World Politics3
MPF Global Perspectives
POL 221Modern World Governments3
POL 271World Politics3
MPF Intercultural Perspectives
POL 142American Politics and Diversity3

Psychology

Any PSY course, AAA 210; BWS 210 or one of the following courses that also fulfill a Global Miami Plan requirement:

MPF Social Science
AAA 210Psychology Across Cultures3
BWS 210Psychology Across Cultures3
PSY 111Introduction to Psychology3
PSY 210Psychology Across Cultures3
MPF Global Perspectives
AAA 210Psychology Across Cultures3
BWS 210Psychology Across Cultures3
PSY 210Psychology Across Cultures3
MPF Intercultural Perspectives
AAA 210Psychology Across Cultures3
BWS 210Psychology Across Cultures3
PSY 210Psychology Across Cultures3

Sociology & Gerontology

MPF Social Science
AAA 207Asia and Globalization3
BWS 279African Americans in Sport3
DST 272Introduction to Disability Studies3
EDP 272Introduction to Disability Studies3
GTY 154Big Ideas in Aging3
ITS 208The Rise of Industrialism in East Asia3
KNH 279African Americans in Sport3
SJS 159Creating Global Peace3
SJS 165Introduction to Social Justice Studies3
SOC 151Social Relations4
SOC 153Sociology in a Global Context3
SOC 165Introduction to Social Justice Studies3
SOC 208The Rise of Industrialism in East Asia3
SOC 272Introduction to Disability Studies3
SOC 279African Americans in Sport3
MPF Global Perspectives
AAA 207Asia and Globalization3
GTY 260Global Aging3
SJS 159Creating Global Peace3
SJS 487Globalization, Social Justice and Human Rights3
SOC 153Sociology in a Global Context3
SOC 487Globalization, Social Justice and Human Rights3
MPF Intercultural Perspectives
BWS 472/BWS 572Race, Ethnicity & Aging3
DST 272Introduction to Disability Studies3
DST 375(Dis)Ability Allies: To be or not to be? Developing Identity and Pride from Practice3
EDP 272Introduction to Disability Studies3
EDP 375(Dis)Ability Allies: To be or not to be? Developing Identity and Pride from Practice3
SJS 487Globalization, Social Justice and Human Rights3
SOC 203Sociology of Gender3
SOC 272Introduction to Disability Studies3
SOC 372Social Stratification3
SOC 375(Dis)Ability Allies: To be or not to be? Developing Identity and Pride from Practice3
SOC 487Globalization, Social Justice and Human Rights3
WGS 203Sociology of Gender3
WGS 375(Dis)Ability Allies: To be or not to be? Developing Identity and Pride from Practice3

Non-specific Category Courses

MPF Social Science
AAA 201Introduction to Asian/ Asian American Studies3
BWS 151Introduction to Black World Studies4
EDP 101Psychology Of The Learner3
EDP 201Human Development and Learning in Social and Educational Contexts3
ITS 201Introduction to International Studies3
KNH 276The Meaning of Leisure3
LAS 207Latin America before 19103
SPA 127Introduction to Communication Disorders3
SPA 223Theories of Language Development3
STC 136Introduction to Interpersonal Communication3
WGS 201Introduction to Women's Studies3
MPF Global Perspectives
AAA 201Introduction to Asian/ Asian American Studies3
AAA 207Asia and Globalization3
AAA 201Introduction to Asian/ Asian American Studies3
BWS 156Introduction to Africa4
BWS 210Psychology Across Cultures3
ITS 201Introduction to International Studies3
PSY 210Psychology Across Cultures3
WGS 201Introduction to Women's Studies3
MPF Intercultural Perspectives
AAA 201Introduction to Asian/ Asian American Studies3
BWS 151Introduction to Black World Studies4
WGS 201Introduction to Women's Studies3

CAS-D Natural Science (10 hrs)

Ten semester hours, three from each of the following categories: Biological Science and Physical Science

Take additional hours from either category to equal ten total; one course must be, or include, a lab designated CAS-D/LAB in the Courses of Instruction section of this Bulletin.

Biological Science

Complete three hours from any course in BIO (except BIO 128), MBI, or GEO 431/GEO 531, GEO 432/GEO 532, or one of the following courses that also fulfill a Global Miami Plan requirement:

MPF Natural Science
BIO 101Biotechnology: Coming of Age in the 21st Century3
BIO 113Animal Diversity4
BIO 114Principles of Biology4
BIO 115Biological Concepts: Ecology, Evolution, Genetics, and Diversity (Lab)4
BIO 116Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular, and Molecular Biology (Lab)4
BIO 121Environmental Biology3
BIO 126Evolution: Just a theory?3
BIO 131Plants, Humanity, and Environment3
BIO 155Field Botany (Lab)3
BIO 161Principles of Human Physiology (Lab)4
BIO 171Human Anatomy and Physiology (Lab)4
BIO 176Ecology of North America3
BIO 181Medicinal and Therapeutic Plants3
BIO 191Plant Biology (Lab)4
MBI 111Microorganisms and Human Disease3
MBI 115Biological Concepts: Ecology, Evolution, Genetics, and Diversity (Lab)4
MBI 116Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular and Molecular Biology (Lab)4
MBI 121The Microbial World3
MBI 123Experimenting with Microbes (Lab)1
MBI 131Community Health Perspectives3
MBI 143Parasitology and Mycology Labs (Lab)1
MBI 161Elementary Medical Microbiology (Lab)4

Physical Science

Complete three hours including any course in CHM, GLG, PHY, or GEO 121, GEO 122, or one of the following courses that also fulfill a Global Miami Plan requirement:

MPF Natural Science
CHM 111Chemistry in Modern Society3
CHM 111LChemistry in Modern Society Laboratory (Lab)1
CHM 131Chemistry of Life Processes (Lab)4
CHM 141College Chemistry3
CHM 141RCollege Chemistry4
CHM 144College Chemistry Laboratory (Lab)2
GEO 121Earth's Physical Environment (Lab)4
GEO 122Geographic Perspectives on the Environment3
GLG 111The Dynamic Earth3
GLG 115LUnderstanding the Earth (Lab)1
GLG 121Environmental Geology3
GLG 141Geology of U.S. National Parks3
PHY 101Physics and Society3
PHY 103Concepts in Physics Laboratory (Lab)1
PHY 111Astronomy and Space Physics3
PHY 118Introduction to Atmospheric Science3
PHY 121Energy and Environment3
PHY 131Physics for Music3
PHY 141Physics in Sports3
PHY 161Physics for the Life Sciences with Laboratory I (Lab)4
PHY 162Physics for the Life Sciences with Laboratory II (Lab)4
PHY 191General Physics with Laboratory I (Lab)5
PHY 192General Physics with Laboratory II (Lab)5

 CAS-E Formal Reasoning (3 hrs)

Three semester hours, designated as CAS-E in the Courses of Instruction section of this Bulletin, including PHL 373 or one of the following courses that also fulfill a Global Miami Plan requirement.

MPF Mathematics, Formal Reasoning, & Technology
ATH 309Introduction to Linguistics4
CLS 303Introduction to Linguistics4
ENG 303Introduction to Linguistics4
GER 309Introduction to Linguistics4
MTH 121Finite Mathematical Models3
MTH 151Calculus I5
MTH 249Calculus II5
PHL 273Formal Logic4
SPN 303Introduction to Linguistics4
STA 261Statistics4

CAS-QL Quantitative Literacy (3 hrs)

Complete three semester hours from the following list: course can be used in other GMP foundations or CAS requirements where approved, excluding Miami Plan Foundation V and CAS-E.

ATH 496Observing Primate Behavior4
BIO 116Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular, and Molecular Biology4
BIO 161Principles of Human Physiology4
CHM 111Chemistry in Modern Society3
CHM 375Analytical Chemistry for Majors3
ECO 311Examining Economic Data and Models3
ENG 222The Rhetoric of Information and Data Visualization3
GEO 205Population and Migration3
GEO 242Mapping a Changing World3
GHS 201Data and Decisions in Global Health3
GLG 111The Dynamic Earth3
GLG 121Environmental Geology3
GLG 141Geology of U.S. National Parks3
HST 202History and Numbers3
IMS 404/IMS 504Advanced Data Visualization3
JRN 404/JRN 504Advanced Data Visualization3
JRN 412Public Affairs Reporting3
MBI 116Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular and Molecular Biology4
MTH 435/MTH 535Mathematical Modeling Seminar3
MTH 453/MTH 553Numerical Analysis3
POL 241American Political System3
POL 306Applied Research Methods3
PSY 293Research Design and Analyses in Psychology I4
PSY 294Research Design and Analyses in Psychology II4
PSY 324Advanced Social Psychology3
SOC 262Research Methods3
STA 333Nonparametric Statistics3
STA 363Introduction to Statistical Modeling3
STA 404/STA 504Advanced Data Visualization3
STA 475Data Analysis Practicum3
WGS 204Gender, Science, & Technology3

Or one of the following courses that also fulfill a Global Miami Plan requirement.

MPF Social Science
POL 241American Political System3
MPF Natural Science
BIO 116Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular, and Molecular Biology4
BIO 161Principles of Human Physiology4
CHM 111Chemistry in Modern Society3
GLG 111The Dynamic Earth3
GLG 121Environmental Geology3
GLG 141Geology of U.S. National Parks3
MBI 116Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular and Molecular Biology4